Jacob Holland-Lulewicz's research while affiliated with Washington University in St. Louis and other places

Publications (14)

Article
Democratic cooperation is a particularly complex type of arrangement that requires attendant institutions to ensure that the problems inherent in collective action do not subvert the public good. It is perhaps due to this complexity that historians, political scientists, and others generally associate the birth of democracy with the emergence of so...
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North America's ancient copper use, predicted to originate as early as 9000 cal BP, represents the earliest use of native copper for utilitarian tool production in the world. Although recent work has focused on establishing the first use of copper in the western Great Lakes region, little attention has been paid to determining the age ranges of sub...
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Defining and examining democracy in non-Western contexts is a conceptual challenge. This is largely because scholars of contemporary political systems outside of anthropology can envision no alternative pathways other than Western expressions of democracy. Such thinking inhibits our understanding of past, and indeed future, democratic systems. In t...
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An enduring problem in North American archaeology concerns the nature of the transition between the Clovis and Folsom Paleoindian complexes in the West. Traditional models indicate a temporal hiatus between the two complexes implying that Folsom was a population replacement for Clovis. Alternatively, if Folsom was an innovation that occurred within...
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A renewed adoption of relational perspectives by archaeologists working in eastern North America has created an opportunity to move beyond categorical approaches, those reliant on the top-down implementation of essentialist models or “types.” Instead, emerging approaches, concerned with highlighting the agential power of relationships between indiv...
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From the kind of data used, to the creativity of approaches aimed at exploring social networks in the past, applications of social network analysis (SNA) in archaeology are characterized by exceptional diversity. In recent years, applications of SNA by historians and history-adjacent scholars have also increased dramatically, partly as a product of...
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Archaeologists working in Mexico recently claimed evidence for pre-Last Glacial Maximum human occupation in the Americas, based on lithic items excavated from Chiquihuite Cave, Zacatecas. Although they provide extensive array of ancillary studies of the cave’s chronostratigraphic and paleoenvironmental record, the data they present do not support t...
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Full-text available
Archaeologists working in Mexico recently claimed evidence for pre-Last Glacial Maximum human occupation in the Americas, based on lithic items excavated from Chiquihuite Cave, Zacatecas. Although they provide extensive array of ancillary studies of the cave's chronostratigraphic and paleoenvironmental record, the data they present do not support t...
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Full-text available
As the use of large-scale radiocarbon datasets becomes more common and applications of Bayesian chronological modeling become a standard aspect of archaeological practice, it is imperative that we grow a community of both effective users and consumers. Indeed, research proposals and publications now routinely employ Bayesian chronological modeling...
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Folsom is an early Paleoindian archaeological tradition found in the North American West. Here we report new AMS radiocarbon dates for the Barger Gulch and Lindenmeier sites in Colorado along with unsuccessful dating attempts for Blackwater Draw, the Mitchell Locality, Shifting Sands, and Lipscomb on the Southern Plains. We applied Bayesian modelin...
Article
Hernando de Soto's expedition through the southeastern United States between 1539 and 1543 is often regarded as a watershed moment for the collapse of Indigenous societies across the region. Historical narratives have proposed that extreme depopulation as a result of early contact destabilized Indigenous economies, politics, networks, and tradition...
Article
Theoretical development in archaeology is hindered when basic reference terms such as ‘the settlement,’ ‘the site,’ or ‘society,’ have little relation to the behavior to be explained. Such units were not the organizations that people deployed for the activities important to them. We present an institutional framework that, we argue, helps to overco...

Citations

... Ancestral Muskogean refers to both the people who lived in this region and who spoke various forms of the Muskogean language family. Because many of these groups built and used councils as a form of governance and as an institution of consensus-building, we refer to the genealogies of these institutions as Ancestral Muskogean, though we use archaeological, ethnohistoric, and ethnographic accounts of councils from sources primarily derived from members and ancestors of the Muscogee Nation specifically (see Thompson et al., 2022). Chaudhuri and Chaudhuri's (2001, p. 68-73) A Sacred Path: The Way of the Muscogee Creeks provides a valuable account of Ancestral Muskogean political institutions. ...
... In this argument, it has only been through the superior social evolution originating in Europe that "true" democracy could be realized (cf. Holland-Lulewicz et al., 2022). ...
... Clovis points differ from formal Paleoindian butchering tools in overall morphology, but are largely consistent with Folsom, Plainview, and other points that archaeologists (including Eren and co-authors) understand to be specialized weapon tips. If we accept that Folsom point technology is derived from Clovis point technology (Buchanan et al., 2022;Irwin and Wormington, 1970;Kelly and Todd, 1988) and yet argue (as Eren and co-authors do) that Clovis points were used entirely differently from Folsom points, then we are forced to explain why a particular kind of tool took on a completely new and more function while retaining its basic morphology. In short, we would have to entertain a complicated scenario in which Clovis multi-tools became Folsom specialized projectiles with very little change in overall design or shape, or in archaeological context for that matter. ...
... It is not surprising that the cultural interpretation of these "old" sites received criticism Potter et al., 2021). Implicit in the criticisms is an expectation that diagnostic Upper Paleolithic stone tools are the standard by which all American cultural sites are recognized. ...
... 3. Carry-out tactical models and what-if experiments. Tactical models (Crema, 2018;Lake, 2014;Orton, 1973) and what-if experiments (Buck & Meson, 2015;Hinz, 2020;Holland-Lulewicz & Ritchison, 2021) are simulation techniques consisting of generating, in silico, artificial archaeological data under known conditions to determine the robustness of analytical techniques, explore the impact of particular biases, or estimate necessary sample sizes and guide data collection. These are powerful yet relatively underutilised tools that can enormously help in any statistical analysis. ...
... Based on the IntCal20 revision, the site now is about a century older, ca. 12,700-12,750 cal BP. Buchanan et al. (2021) report several new Folsom dates on calcined and unburnt bone, and apply a Bayesian program to the entire corpus of reliable dates (n = 37) to estimate the temporal span of the Folsom tradition. Calcined bones from the Barger Gulch site in Colorado were dated to 10,922 ± 61 (AA-109926), 10,874 ± 61 (AA-109925), and 10,718 ± 41 (AA-112887) rcbp. ...
... Archaeologists increasingly follow a relational approach to analysing and interpreting the past, particularly in North America (Holland-Lulewicz, 2021). This opening of the theoretical and interpretive landscape offers us the opportunity to experiment with different frameworks, including alternatives to the Western and positivistic ones that have generally dominated the discipline from its inception (Verdesio, 2022). ...
... Generally, archaeologists constructed these chronologies early in the heyday of the development of culture-histories without a deeper consideration of sampling, recovery rates, nor the complex economic behaviours that governed the distribution and consumption of European goods. As recent research demonstrates, Indigenous peoples variously incorporated or rejected European goods (Birch et al., 2021;Holland-Lulewicz et al., 2020;Manning et al., 2018Manning and Hart, 2019;Panich and Schneider, 2019). The singular importance of the assumed desire to engage in trade with Europeans also overlooks the fact that such objects often travelled along preexisting Indigenous longdistance trade networks and that the disruptions of the early colonial era variously served to cement or disrupt preexisting economic structures. ...
... Sustained collective action efforts are key to the development of institutions, that is, the "organizations of people that carry out objectives using regularized practices and norms, labor, and resources" ( [10], pp. 40-41; [12,13]). Here, we explore the case of Manihiki and Rakahanga, a dual-atoll cluster in the Northern Cook Islands of East Polynesia (Figure 1). ...