J. S. Finger's research while affiliated with Bimini Biological Field Station Foundation and other places

Publications (10)

Article
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1. Consistent individual differences in behaviour (i.e. personality) can be explained in an evolutionary context if they are favoured by life history trade-offs as conceptualized in the pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis. Theory predicts that faster-growing individuals suffer higher mortality and that this trade-off is mediated through explora...
Data
1) Consistent individual differences in behaviour (i.e. personality) can be explained in an evolutionary context if they are favoured by life-history trade-offs as conceptualized in the pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis. Theory predicts that faster growing individuals suffer higher mortality and that this trade-off is mediated through explora...
Article
Full-text available
Personality traits (i.e. consistent individual differences in behaviour) often covary, forming behavioural syndromes. Such associations, if driven by an underlying proximate mechanism, could limit the independent evolution of each behaviour. In contrast, a behavioural syndrome may be the result of selection favouring the behavioural correlation und...
Article
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Despite substantial research interest in understanding individual-level consistency in behavioral attributes, significant knowledge gaps remain across traits and taxa. For example, relatively few studies have looked at social personality in large marine species such as elasmobranchs and whether or not individual differences in behavior are maintain...
Chapter
Because of its impact on our understanding of evolution and ecology, animal personality has become an important area of research within behavioral ecology. Indeed, individual variation is no longer considered random noise but as a consistent phenomenon that impacts animal biology. However, research on animal personality and individual differences h...
Article
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A thorough understanding of movement patterns of a species is critical for designing effective conservation and management initiatives. However, generating such information for large marine vertebrates is challenging, as they typically move over long distances, live in concealing environments, are logistically difficult to capture and, as upper-tro...
Article
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Billfishes are considered to be among the fastest swimmers in the oceans. Previous studies have estimated maximum speed of sailfish and black marlin at around 35 m s(-1) but theoretical work on cavitation predicts that such extreme speed is unlikely. Here we investigated maximum speed of sailfish, and three other large marine pelagic predatory fish...
Article
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Personality differences are widespread throughout the animal kingdom and can have important ecological and evolutionary consequences. Despite a rapidly increasing body of literature, large (marine) vertebrates remain underrepresented in personality research. Given their unique life history traits (e.g. slow growth rate, slow reproduction rate, long...
Article
Full-text available
The ability of elasmobranchs to orient to weak electromagnetic fields is well documented. Recently, scientists have employed the use of strong electrosensory stimuli, such as permanent magnets, as a means to evaluate the repellent responses of elasmobranchs and assess the utility of these materials for bycatch repellent technologies. However, sever...

Citations

... Animal personality has been defined as a consistent and relatively stable amongindividual variation in behavior that is present in a wide variety of taxa [12]. In the past two decades, researchers have discovered that the animal personality is related to the immune system [13,14] and metabolism [9,15,16] states, which in turn affects the development of organs [17,18] and the variation of behaviors [19][20][21]. The "State-behavior feedbacks" theory regards individual state variations as the reason for individual behavior differences, and individuals thus differ in personalities because they are in a different state, adjusting their behaviors in an adaptive fashion to these differences [22]. ...
... exhibited risk-prone behaviours) and had higher growth rates and (ii) that natural selection acted against explorative, fast growing individuals in two adjacent subpopulations of juvenile lemon sharks (North Sound and Sharkland, see Fig.1). Because these subpopulations were described to differ in their predator abundance, with Sharkland having more predators (Dhellemmes, Finger, Laskowski, Guttridge, & Krause, 2020;Guttridge et al., 2012), we expected selection on exploration behaviour and fast growth to be stronger there than in North Sound. Chapter 3 -Personality driven life-history trade-offs differ in two subpopulations of free ranging predators ...
... Like social birds and mammals, elasmobranchs maintain social preferences between individuals (Guttridge et al., 2009;Perryman et al., 2019), and their social interactions can have adaptive functions (e.g. in learning or information transfer; Guttridge et al., 2011;Keller et al., 2017;Vila Pouca et al., 2020;Papastamatiou et al., 2020) that contribute to emergent population structuring (Mourier & Planes, 2021;Papastamatiou et al., 2020). Sharks are known to have highly variable behavioural phenotypes relating to exploration and movement, sufficient to comprise individual personalities (Jacoby et al., 2014;Byrnes & Brown, 2016;Finger et al., 2017Finger et al., , 2018. Differences in movement behaviour and sociability are often linked and may covary in the form of a behavioural syndrome (Burns, 2016). ...
... Like social birds and mammals, elasmobranchs maintain social preferences between individuals (Guttridge et al., 2009;Perryman et al., 2019), and their social interactions can have adaptive functions (e.g. in learning or information transfer; Guttridge et al., 2011;Keller et al., 2017;Vila Pouca et al., 2020;Papastamatiou et al., 2020) that contribute to emergent population structuring (Mourier & Planes, 2021;Papastamatiou et al., 2020). Sharks are known to have highly variable behavioural phenotypes relating to exploration and movement, sufficient to comprise individual personalities (Jacoby et al., 2014;Byrnes & Brown, 2016;Finger et al., 2017Finger et al., , 2018. Differences in movement behaviour and sociability are often linked and may covary in the form of a behavioural syndrome (Burns, 2016). ...
... In recent years, research on various elasmobranch species (cartilaginous fishes including sharks, rays and skates) has shown that their populations can be socially structured (Mourier et al., 2012;. Like social birds and mammals, elasmobranchs maintain social preferences between individuals (Guttridge et al., 2009;Perryman et al., 2019), and their social interactions can have adaptive functions (e.g. in learning or information transfer; Guttridge et al., 2011;Keller et al., 2017;Vila Pouca et al., 2020;Papastamatiou et al., 2020) that contribute to emergent population structuring (Mourier & Planes, 2021;Papastamatiou et al., 2020). Sharks are known to have highly variable behavioural phenotypes relating to exploration and movement, sufficient to comprise individual personalities (Jacoby et al., 2014;Byrnes & Brown, 2016;Finger et al., 2017Finger et al., , 2018. ...
... This contrasting pattern of female philopatry against a background of male-biased dispersal is now the prevailing view for many sharks, including large species with global ranges (e.g. Daly-Engel et al., 2012;Bernard et al., 2016;Guttridge et al., 2017). But these conclusions do not address findings from telemetry on the same populations, which provide evidence of both males and females using site fidelity and consistently show female sharks moving equivalent or longer distances than males, as vagility would predict (Chapman et al., 2015;Guttridge et al., 2017;Ajemian et al., 2020). ...
... For example, we do not currently know the degree to which various wave shape parameters contribute to stride length, which refers to distance travelled per cycle, and has been used to characterize not only walking and running, but also such locomotor modes as swimming (e.g. Aubret and Shine, 2008;Clark and Bemis, 1979;Drucker and Jensen, 1996;Svendsen et al., 2016;Videler and Wardle, 1991;Wardle, 1975) and crawling (Berrigan and Pepin, 1995;Quillin, 1999). ...
... tests commonly used in this species are less robust. Other evidence indicates that a test might measure different behavioural traits in different species 33 . In addition, for fish, a number of studies have revealed how behavioural assessment can be altered by small changes in the experimental setting and the apparatus 34,35 . ...
... Where some localities implement a Science-based and "eco-friendly" approach (e.g., Exclusion nets in Cape Town, South Africa), other localities have implemented indiscriminate shark culls through the use of drumlines and/or shark nets [7]. Although there is insufficient evidence that demonstrates the effectiveness of some to water visibility, thus altering behavior [25], it was hypothesized that variations in water visibility would alter the barrier's exclusion capabilities. ...