J. P. Van De Geer's scientific contributions

Publications (3)

Article
An introductory study of the perception of stochastically specified events is reported. The initial problem was to determine whether the perceiver can split visual input data of this kind into random and determined components. The inability of subjects to do so with the stimulus material used (a filmlike sequence of dot patterns), led to the more g...
Article
As a preliminary to further research on musical consonance an explanatory investigation was made on the different modes of judgment of musical intervals. This was done by way of a semantic differential. Subjects rated 23 intervals against 10 scales. In a factor analysis three factors appeared: pitch, evaluation and fusion. The relation between thes...

Citations

... We call this time-independent psychoacoustic quality for an ordered pair of chords the resolve. This time-independent quantity has been studied under different names in [100,[134][135][136], but we would like to emphasize its dependence on its contextual reference by giving it this new name. ...
... Guttman also produced a series of papers that deepened the mathematical foundations of factor analysis, and contributed to the mathematical theory behind matrix approximation in general (Hubert, Meulman and Heiser, 2000). His interest in codability as a factor in perception-the idea that the perceiver has a limited capacity for processing the incoming information-led to cooperation with Nico Frijda on the recognition of facial expressions (Frijda and Van de Geer, 1961) and with Willem Levelt on the detection of stochastically specified events (Van de Geer and Levelt, 1963). He was one of the early adopters of Joe Kruskal's non-metric multidimensional scaling technique (Kruskal, 1964), in a tone perception study that tried to explain how and why the sensorial experience of consonance in tone intervals is related to simple frequency ratios (Levelt, Van de Geer, and Plomp, 1966). ...
... Ratio simplicity can therefore provide a proxy for periodicity/harmonicity. Previous research has formalized ratio simplicity in various ways, with the resulting measures predicting the consonance of just-tuned chords fairly well (e.g., Euler, 1739;Geer, Levelt, & Plomp, 1962;Levelt, Geer, & Plomp, 1966;Schellenberg & Trehub, 1994). 12 Unfortunately, these measures generally fail to predict consonance for chords that are not just-tuned. ...