J. Greenberg's research while affiliated with University of Colorado Colorado Springs and other places

Publications (16)

Article
The terror management prediction that reminders of death motivate in-group identification assumes people view their identifications positively. However, when the in-group is framed negatively, mortality salience should lead to disidentification. Study 1 found that mortality salience increased women's perceived similarity to other women except under...
Article
Three studies examined the possibility that being liked intrinsically by others - for who one is - reduces self-esteem defense, whereas being liked for what one has achieved does not. All 3 studies contrasted the effects on self-esteem defense of liking based on intrinsic or achievement-related aspects of self. Study 1 showed that thoughts of being...
Article
The present research examined the hypothesis derived from terror management theory that identifications with sports teams shield against the potential consequences of awareness of death. Experiment I demonstrated that Dutch participants who were reminded of their death expressed greater optimism about the results of the national soccer team compare...

Citations

... While self-esteem deals with feeling successful in one's pursuits to live up to worldview-prescribed and often contingent standards of worth (Pyszczynski et al., 2004), autonomy deals with exercising a sense of choice and self-direction in life; in other words, autonomous functioning is that in which people feel their actions are volitional and represent their most important personal values and feelings, rather than representing external and contingent standards of value. Research has shown that being valued for intrinsic qualities reduces defensiveness (Arndt et al., 2002;Schimel et al., 2001), and MS motivates worldview defense among those with high extrinsic esteem orientations, but not among those with low extrinsic esteem orientations (e.g., Williams et al., 2010). That is, those with more intrinsic and self-determined sources of personal value are better able to manage death-related anxiety. ...
... Lifshin et al. (2017) found that American college students who experience the death of a close other are more likely to care about their national identity and rate it as important to them, and that such increased identification is associated with a slightly higher level of self-esteem. Aside from increasing self-esteem by living up to cultural standards and values, people also try to maintain their self-esteem after MS by distancing themselves from groups when such identification might risk their sense of self-worth (Arndt et al., 2002). Nevertheless, because self-esteem is ultimately dependent on the integrity of cultural worldviews, which provide individuals with avenues for attaining immortality, self-enhancement might only be a desired avenue for terror management strategy if it does not challenge important aspects of the cultural worldview (e.g., Landau et al., 2009). ...
... Specifically, being reminded of one's mortality makes one assert one's cultural worldview more strongly and resist criticisms of it. This has been a major line of work derived from Terror Management Theory (Greenberg et al., 1986), and there are many published replications already of mortality salience effects. Yet the multi-site attempt failed to find significant support for it, despite the large sample. ...
... Accordingly, deficit-oriented VoA are thought to serve as an anxiety-buffer, helping people to protect their sense of self-esteem, worthiness, and sustainability despite the awareness of the inevitability of death (Martens, Greenberg, Schimel, & Landau, 2004). Levy & Leifheit-Limson, 2009), but only AARC explicitly acknowledges that VoA are multidirectional (i.e., AARC includes representations of age-related gains) as well as multidimensional (i.e., as opposed to organized along a global positive-negative dichotomy). ...
... One possible explanation for such findings is that autonomy bolsters and affirms a sense of symbolic immortality. As suggested elsewhere (e.g., Greenberg et al., 1995;Pyszczynski et al., 2003), living life autonomously might support a sense of personal value that is particularly durable in the face of death, providing a sense of value based on internal and intrinsic (rather than external and contingent) standards of worth. Accordingly, autonomy could support a sense of symbolic immortality beyond general feelings of self-esteem. ...
... People may translate this into an attack on their own person (identity) and defend it by consuming even more. Dickinson (2009) refers to a study that supports the idea that consumerism is increased by thoughts about death (Kasser & Sheldon, 2000;Solomon, Greenberg, & Pyszczynski, 2004). The connection between consumption and identity to some extent contradicts the idea of Fahrenbach and Kragulj (2019) who propose that identity can be formed through actions, such as consumption (see Figure 42). ...
... Greenberg has also developed an analysis of the interplay of terror management motivation and growth motivation involving expansion and enrichment of the self (e.g., Greenberg et al. 1995). Recent research (see Greenberg et al. 2014) has provided support for this analysis, showing that when terror management resources are strong, reminders of mortality can, instead of motivating defensiveness, promote openmindedness, creativity, and personal growth. ...
Reference: Gender schemas
... , 우울 (Lee HM et al., 2014), 불안 (Pyszczynski et al., 2004) (Kohut, 1971;Kernberg, 1975 2) 자존감 질문지(Self-Esteem Scale, SES) 자존감 수준 척도로 가장 널리 사용되고 있는 Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965 ...
... According to Sedikides, global narratives that apply to multiple identity themes are easier to access and used regularly and the same may be true for narratives associated with social identities: In line with findings that have shown increased norm support following existential threats for salient self-defining norms (Jonas et al., 2008;Stollberg, Fritsche, & Jonas, 2017), narratives for identity protection could be activated through the dispositional or situational activation of social identities. In short, identity must be shared ("be meaningful") and part of the self to serve as a buffer to threat effects (Arndt, Greenberg, Schimel, Pyszczynski, & Solomon, 2002;Dechesne, Greenberg, Arndt, & Schimel, 2000). ...
... The present work also found that MS can motivate both support for military actions (a hostile defense of one's cultural system) and support for more expansive and welcoming immigration policy (a prosocial defense of the cultural value of tolerance). Likewise, some have urged caution about the perhaps overly-optimistic "humanistic" view of self-determination; as Pyszczynski et al., (2000) noted, " … autonomous functioning is no guarantee that a person will behave well toward others … " (p. 302). ...