J. A. Schuster's research while affiliated with University of California, Santa Barbara and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Full-text available
We propose a set of statistics for detecting non-Gaussianity in one-dimensional cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) anisotropy data sets. These statistics are both simple and, according to calculations over a space of linear combinations of three-point functions, nearly optimal at detecting certain types of nonGaussian features. We use thi...
Article
Full-text available
We propose a set of statistics $S_q$ for detecting non-gaussianity in CMBR anisotropy data sets. These statistics are both simple and, according to calculations over a space of linear combinations of three-point functions, nearly optimal at detecting certain types of non-gaussian features. We apply $S_3$ to the UCSB SP91 experiment and find that th...
Article
Full-text available
We report on the preliminary result of a search for anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation (CBR). Our receiver operates with four equally spaced channels from 25 to 35 GHz with a beam size of approximately 1.5 degrees full width at half maximum. The system operated successfully for 500 hr at the South Pole during 1990-1991 austral summer. Th...
Article
Full-text available
We have developed and flown a 1 m diameter Gregorian telescope system for measurements of anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR). The telescope is incorporated in a balloon-borne stabilized platform with arcminute stabilization capability. To date, the system has flown four times and observed from the ground at the South Pole twice. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Preliminary results are presented from the measurement of medium-to-large angular-scale fluctuations in the 15-25 GHz cosmic background radiation (CBR) by an expedition to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. While no such fluctuations have yet been detected, data analyses are proceeding on the bases of likelihood-ratio tests which set upper limi...
Article
Full-text available
We have developed a system for making measurements of spatial fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation at 3 mm wavelength, on an angular scale of .5 to 5 degrees. The system includes a telescope with a Gaussian beam with a full width at half max (FWHM) of 20 to 50 arc?minutes, an SIS (Superconductor?Insulator?Superconductor) cohere...

Citations

... Dragovan, Stark, and Pernic (1990) built a lightweight 1.2 m offset telescope and were able to get it working at the Pole with a single-pixel helium-4 bolometer during several weeks in January 1987 (See Figure 1). The results were sufficiently encouraging that several CMB groups (Dragovan et al. 1989, Gaier et al. 1989, Meinhold et al. 1989, Peterson et al. 1989) participated in the "Cucumber" campaign in the Austral summer of 1988-1989, where three Jamesway tents and a generator were set up at a temporary site dedicated to CMB anisotropy 2 km from South Pole Station in the direction of the International Date Line. These were summer-only campaigns, where instruments were shipped in, assembled, tested, used, disassembled, and shipped out in a single three-month-long summer season. ...
... Some achievements in experimental physics and astrophysics during of a few last decades show that it would be useful additionally to study important background theoretical aspects for classic and quantum physics. First of all among such experimental achievements we name the registration of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) with the finite temperature T 0 = 2.73 K [1]- [5]. The second significant achievement is the discovery of Dark Matter/Energy (DME) [6] [7], which is also called "physical vacuum". ...
... One needs to be careful in using the central limit theorem to motivate Gaussian Random Fields, particularly in the presence of nonlinearity, which could result in the elements of the ensemble no longer being independent. While the assumption of primordial homogeneous and isotropic GRF's is plausible, because the perturbations are made up of a sufficiently large number of independent random variables, the key point is to realize that these are assumptions that should be tested if possible [72,125,156,109,63]. ...
... This is a widely used device in ballooning and has been employed in several experiments (e.g. Meinhold et al., 1993). Due to the large volume of the balloon (diameter > 100 m), wind shear can likely cause random rotations on it. ...
... Dragovan, Stark, and Pernic (1990) built a lightweight 1.2 m offset telescope and were able to get it working at the Pole with a single-pixel helium-4 bolometer during several weeks in January 1987 (See Figure 1). The results were sufficiently encouraging that several CMB groups (Dragovan et al. 1989, Gaier et al. 1989, Meinhold et al. 1989, Peterson et al. 1989) participated in the "Cucumber" campaign in the Austral summer of 1988-1989, where three Jamesway tents and a generator were set up at a temporary site dedicated to CMB anisotropy 2 km from South Pole Station in the direction of the International Date Line. These were summer-only campaigns, where instruments were shipped in, assembled, tested, used, disassembled, and shipped out in a single three-month-long summer season. ...