Ian Stevenson's research while affiliated with University of Virginia and other places

Publications (13)

Article
Transcendental near-death experiences show some cross-cultural variation that suggests they may be influenced by societal beliefs. The prevailing Western model of near-death experiences was defined by Moody's description of the phenomenon in 1975. To explore the influence of this cultural model, we compared near-death experience accounts collected...
Article
Description of birthmarks having the pattern of strands of a rope in a second known case includes some verification of the correspondence between the birthmarks and injuries from ropes on an identified decreased person.
Article
Full-text available
Most people who have a near-death experience (NDE) say that the experience convinced them that they will survive death. People who have not had such an experience, however, may not share this conviction. Although all features of NDEs, when looked at alone, might be explained in ways other than survival, there are three features in particular that w...
Article
Full-text available
One of the main reasons that near-death experiences have gener- ated so much interest in recent years among the general public is because they seem to provide evidence that consciousness survives the death of the physical body. It is puzzling, therefore, that most researchers - both those interested in NDEs and those interested in survival research...
Article
This paper reports an analysis of the features of 122 cases of persons who became ill or even came close to death, but who survived and afterward reported that during the experience they recalled memories of earlier events in their lives. The life review varied widely in its form; the number of memories recalled ranged from only one or two to the s...
Article
The medical records of 58 patients, most of whom believed they were near death during an illness or after an injury and all of whom later remembered unusual experiences occurring at the time, were examined. 28 patients were judged to have been so close to death that they would have died without medical intervention; the other 30 patients were not i...
Article
In the cases of 107 patients who reported unusual experiences during an illness or injury, such as seeing their own body from a different position in space, medical records were obtained for forty patients. These were examined and rated according to the evidence they provided of grave, life-threatening illness or injury. Eighteen patients (45%) wer...
Article
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The authors studied retrospectively 78 reports of "near-death experiences using subjects narratives and questionnaires, interviews, and medical records. Prior experiences suggestive of transcendence of death were more common among these subjects than among control populations, but prior experiences suggestive of extrasensory phenomena were less com...
Article
Near-death experiences (NDEs), profound events reported by people who have been close to death, often include feelings of peace, a sense of being outside the physical body, a life review, and meeting apparent nonphysical beings and environments; and they often precipitate profound changes in attitudes and values. Research on NDEs has focused on the...
Article
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One of the authors recently has reviewed the evidence that suggests man's survival after death. The evidence available is far from necessitating a conclusion in favor of such survival, but it is also far from deserving the neglect it has received from most scientists. One type of research that may contribute to this evidence is the investigation of...
Article
DURING the last two decades, articles and books about death and dying have proliferated, but, with rare exceptions, their authors ignore completely the question of whether man survives after death. One of us (I.S.) recently has reviewed the evidence that suggests man's survival after death.1 The evidence available is far from necessitating a conclu...
Article
Full-text available
One of the main reasons that near-death experiences have generated so much interest in recent years among the general public is because they seem to provide evidence that consciousness survives the death of the physical body. It is puzzling, therefore, that most researchers -both those interested in NDEs and those interested in survival research- h...

Citations

... NDE studies face the notorious problem of accurately timestamping the NDEr's experience-something that can only be attempted after resuscitation" (2021b*, p. 48). Even if we could accurately timestamp when an NDE occurred, Braude adds, we still face an additional problem noted by Cook et al., (1998), namely: "If we don't know the physical or physiological conditions required for ordinary cognitive functioning (much less optimal cognitive functioning), we should be wary of drawing conclusions about the significance of the evidence" (Braude, 2021b*, p. 49). In other words, there's an inherent Catch-22 in Nahm's argument that "neurophysiological models cannot account for conscious awareness during apparent states of unconsciousness such as in critical NDEs or Juan's evident coma" (2021*, p. 15). ...
... In general, about 9-20% of the people having survived lifethreatening conditions such as clinical death reported NDEs (Greyson, 1998;Schwaninger et al., 2002;Kondziella, 2020). Content or themes of the reports have been listed in many studies (Moody, 1975;Rawlings, 1978;Ring, 1980;Sabom, 1983;Grey, 1985;Kübler-Ross, 1991;Morse and Perry, 1991;Fenwick and Fenwick, 1997). ...
... Reports of OBE perception of events are crucial because they can be independently corroborated, that is, proven to coincide with reality. In that regard, quite a few reports of veridical OBE perception have been authenticated by independent witnesses (Clark, 1984;Cook, Greyson, & Stevenson, 1998;Holden, 2009;Kelly, Greyson, & Stevenson, 2000;Owens, 1995). For example, Cook et al. (1998, pp. ...
... In particular, this included features such as perceptions of seeing one's own physical body, experiencing a lack of pain, feeling a sense of peace, experiencing different perceptions of time, having a VLRE, encountering perceived OBE personages, seeing a bright light of some sort, encountering tunnels, and experiencing a transcendental locale. This is not all that surprising for earlier research in which the medical records of those reporting NDEs was examined found that a significant number of them were not really physiologically near death even though they believed that they were (Owens et al., 1990;Stevenson et al., 1990); nevertheless, their NDEs consisted of many of the same features as those that were associated with a genuine near-death condition (also see Gabbard & Twemlow, 1991). However, in this study, many of the experients of perceived OBEs who were not physiologically near death not only had similar perceptions and features with those who were, but some of them also did not in fact believe that they were near death. ...
... Another phenomenon related to reincarnation is the near death experiences which are wideranging experiences related to impending death. 6 In a study conducted in a multi-religious general hospital population in Sri Lanka, participants from theistic religious groups were found to have a higher prevalence of near-death experiences than the non-theistic group. 7 Reports of children expressing memories of past lives were beginning to appear from late 19th century. ...
... Because near-death experiences involving elaborate perceptions, thought processes, and emotions can occur in conditions with severe brain impairment, they may contribute to our understanding of the neurophysiologic processes involved in consciousness (van Lommel et al., 2001). An analysis of near-death experiences involving examination of contemporaneous medical records showed that patients reported enhanced mental functioning significantly more often when physiological proximity to death was well documented than when it was not (Owens et al., 1991). A high priority of research into near-death experiences thus should be to investigate cases involving close monitoring of the person's brain function and physiology. ...
... For example, Owens and colleagues compared the medical records of 58 people who had had an NDE, checking the circumstances of its onset. 4 They found that the accounts did not differ sufficiently between those whose lives had been genuinely endangered and those who were not. The intensity and content scores on the NDE scale were very close. ...
... A debate is underway between researchers about whether the NDE is simply a subjective psychological and/or neurological experience (Blackmore, 2017;Mobbs & Watt, 2011;Woerlee, 2005) or an objective encounter with a real spiritual realm (Long & Perry, 2010;Morse & Perry, 1990; van Lommel, 2010;2013), and as other researchers have aptly pointed out, there is also a lack of consensus on the exact definition of an NDE (Craffert, 2019;Long, 2014;van Wees et al., 2011). Nevertheless, there is some agreement among many researchers in the belief that they often include a number of specific features that may or may not be present from one NDE to the next (Greyson, 1983;Greyson & Stevenson, 1980;Martial et al., 2020;Moody, 1976;Ring, 1980;Sabom, 1982). For example, as relevant to this paper, some of these common features include the impression of being out of or away from the physical body, encountering presumed spiritual personages of some sort, a feeling of overwhelming love and/or acceptance, and then eventually returning to the physical body by either choice or compulsion. ...
... The life reviews reported by participants in this study were consistent with those reported by Western NDErs. Researchers have found that the specific form of Western NDErs' life reviews may involve a panoramic display of memories in chronological order but may also deviate from that form, appearing out of chronological order and/or not panoramically (Stevenson & Cook, 1995). Supporting this finding, the life reviews in this study did not occur panoramically or in chronological order. ...
... [91][92][93][94][95][96][97][98] As mentioned earlier, we have found from anecdotal observations that occasionally, when teaching CP to students, they would relive their previous NDE experience during their CP. It became clear that the four attributes previously described 70,99 to NDEs, applied to SCEs. These are paranormal, out-of-body; cognitive, timelessness; affective, peacefulness; and transcendent, divine. ...