Ian Robinson's research while affiliated with Brunel University London and other places

Publications (11)

Article
Full-text available
Patients on oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) require regular testing of the prothrombin time (PT) and the international normalised ratio (INR) to monitor their blood coagulation level to avoid complications of either over or under coagulation. PT/INR can be tested by a healthcare professional or by the patient. The latter mode of the testing is kno...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to suggest an acceptable and generic theoretical framework for involving various types of users in the medical device technology (MDT) development process (MDTDP). The authors propose a theoretical framework suggesting different routes, methods and stages through which various types of medical device users can be involved...
Article
The representation of end users' perspectives in healthcare decisions requires involvement of their surrogates when the end users, i.e. certain patients, elderly people, children and people with disabilities, are unable to present their views. To review critical issues, and the advantages and disadvantages of involving surrogates in representing en...
Article
Full-text available
A myriad of medical devices deployed by many users play an essential role in healthcare, and they, and their users, need to be defined, classified and coded effectively. This study provides definitions of terms frequently employed to describe the users of medical device technologies (MDT) as well as a classification of such users. Devices are widel...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the benefits of and barriers to user involvement in medical device technology development and evaluation. A structured review of published literature in peer-reviewed journals was conducted. This literature review revealed that the main benefits of user involvement were an increased access to user needs, experiences, and ide...
Chapter
The development and evaluation of medical devices from users’ perspectives requires the involvement of actual end users of The development and evaluation of medical devices from users’ perspectives requires the involvement of actual end users of medical devices. This kind of involvement of end users may not be always possible. A solution to this ma...
Article
Full-text available
Medical device users are one of the principal medical device technology stakeholders. The involvement of users in medical device technology development and assessment is central to meet their needs. This study aims to examine this issue. A structured review of the literature published from 1980 to 2005 in peer-reviewed journals was carried out from...

Citations

... The amount of public awareness campaigns has significantly increased [35]. Social media can collect information concerning hospital and doctor's performance based on their patients' experiences [36]. It is also applied for health progress and health studies. ...
... Security leads to a different consideration of health personnel, in particular Doctors, Surgeons, Anesthesiologists, Caregivers and in certain cases patients as well; for further reading on this subject, the potential diversity of actors in healthcare who are users of medical devices, see the study by Shah and Robinson (2008). In addition to medical devices currently in use, they will need to use devices that are connected to H4.0IS. ...
... Numerous guidelines for such user-centered design (UCD) of AAT have evolved of the past two decades, proposing similar approaches to promote the consideration of complex user needs in human-robot interactions [8][9][10][11]. Unfortunately, the early and active involvement of target users with special needs is easier said than done. User-centered design not only requires substantial resources, but most importantly the willingness, openness, and availability of people with disabilities and technology makers to form such interdisciplinary development teams. ...
... Literature, however, cautions against the reliability of family as informants, with biased and variable capability well documented. [46][47][48][49] Conversely, others have conceptualised family as ideally placed to enhance patient autonomy, typically through relational knowing associated with their shared history. 11 Importantly, cultural variance of both clinician and patient may be associated with end-of-life care preferences 50 and attitudes towards the role of family at end of life, 51 making cultural sensitivity essential at this time. ...
... Technology has the potential to address these limitations, by empowering people with heart failure to better manage their health, and to optimize communication with their clinicians when and if needed. Further, current approaches for designing technology interventions have typically failed to include patients and clinicians in the product design (14), which leads to lower levels of acceptance, dissatisfaction, stress and non-adherence (15)(16)(17). ...
... Device designers may suffer from insufficient organizational support to engage with users, or experience in adapting user advice to incorporate device designers [50]. This is particularly the case for products that have users who are dissimilar in socio-economic background and group to the designers [51]. ...