Ian P Curry's scientific contributions

Publications (10)

Article
Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) are increasingly used in military operations. Successful operations, despite no human onboard, are heavily human-dependent. A review of Army UAS accidents was completed to evaluate the role of the human in these accidents so as to inform future research and operations. Reports of 288 accidents occurring between 2010 an...
Article
INTRODUCTION: Fatigue continues to be a leading cause of military aviation mishaps. Several factors, including reversed shift missions, can negatively affect sleep patterns and increase the risk of fatigue due to sleep restriction. Currently, there is a lack of objective data regarding the current rest and activity patterns of military aviators acr...
Article
BACKGROUND: Perceptions of features of automation, such as its safety and effects on basic flying skills, can shape how someone uses automation and accepts newly developed technology. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate current U.S. Army rotary-wing aviators' perspectives of cockpit automation in terms of safety features and effects on...
Article
Introduction: There have been few large-scale epidemiological examinations of military aircrew populations reported in recent literature. This study examined 10 yr of medical records contained in the U.S. Army Aeromedical Electronic Resource Office (AERO) in an effort to identify the most prevalent conditions affecting Army aviator career longevit...
Article
Introduction Female aviators with health conditions may face a variety of occupational impacts. Outcomes may include a waiver for continued flight or a permanent suspension, in which flight is no longer possible. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of medical diagnosis among female U.S. Army aviators over a ten year period an...
Article
Introduction: Fatigue plays a critical role in mission success due to its effect on a number of performance variables. The purpose of this study was to gauge the extent to which U.S. Army aviators experience subjective fatigue on a regular basis presently as well as their perceptions of their own sleep quality, quantity, and daytime sleepiness. Th...
Article
: The employment of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) has become ubiquitous, not only within modern multinational militaries, but also among the civilian and commercial aviation communities. Although the concept of UAS application dates much farther back than most realize (unmanned balloons were used during the American Civil War for ordnance delivery...
Article
Introduction: Accident investigation and review are important not only to attribute failure modes, but also mitigate risk, improve safety, and enhance capability. It was hypothesized that an interesting perspective on British Army Air Corps (AAC) rotary-wing (RW) accidents may be garnered by contrasting data from the previous two decades with a ge...
Article
Fatigue is a complex entity with contributing factors that may include insufficient sleep, circadian dysrhythmia, high workload, extended duty periods, clinical sleep pathology, psychosocial aspects, environmental factors, and many others. It can contribute to significant performance deficits and crucial safety lapses. Despite maximal implementatio...

Citations

... As many as 80% of army aviators and 90% of aviators in training were found to sleep <8 h per night with these individuals sleeping an average of 6.6 h per night (Tvaryanas and Thompson, 2006;Kelley et al., 2018;Bernhardt et al., 2019). Sleep decreased even more during operations, with average sleep per night being 6 h prior to an operation and only 5.6 h during an operation (Belland and Bissell, 1994). ...
... For example [9,10] : (1) The medical waiver can be granted to pilots who have undergone surgical removal of all gross tumors, or who have completed adjuvant treatment without any side effects of treatment, or who have no evidence of tumor after operations. However, those with lymph node metastasis shall be considered until 2 years after the completion of treatment [11,12] . And (2) In general, the medical waiver shall not be granted to the pilots with distant metastasis, residual tumors, and treatment-related side effects. ...
... There is also a rule stating that the pilots with CRC or histories of CRC are not eligible for flight. All the 3 cases reported here had passed the high-risk period of recurrence and metastasis for 2 years after surgical operations [13][14][15] . With reference to relevant foreign guidelines and the latest evidence-based guidelines at home and abroad, also considering the types of aircrafts, the flight posts, personal willingness, organizational opinions and psychosomatic tests, the individualized flight qualification assessment shall be conducted for these pilots and they will also undergo rigorous follow-up medical observation. ...
... The optimal method of avoiding fatigue is to have sufficient (night-time) sleep. This is often difficult to achieve in aviation, however, especially during military deployments, as sleep in the field is often of lesser quality and duration than sleep at home (Kelley et al., 2018). Moreover, performing operations at night may be tactically necessary. ...
... First, while the standard definition of flight category is based on both ceiling and visibility [9], only the former was used in the current study. Nevertheless, weather-related general aviation accidents with a fatal outcome are often due to spatial disorientation following an inadvertent encounter with low ceilings [10,25,26]. A second limitation was that, in focusing the study on geographical areas likely to experience marginal weather conditions on a given day based largely on synoptically-driven features (LCL heights and/or frontal regions), aerodromes affected by their own micro-climates may have escaped evaluation. ...
... Fatigue can also negatively affect the pilot's performance, decreasing attention capacity and flexibility (Caldwell, 1997;Farrell et al., 2016). Landing is usually the final task for the pilot coming back from a mission, and it requires an increased cognitive effort after a less demanding cruising period (Gaydos et al., 2013;Hartzler, 2014). ...