INGEMAR FÄGERLIND's scientific contributions

Publications (10)

Chapter
Education represents a major agent for the control of social change, and has seen how this belief very early was responsible for the increase in educational facilities and expenditures. In more recent times, the two major theoretical and policy-relevant orientations were largely responsible for the complete confidence by researchers and policy-make...
Chapter
This chapter highlights that education is only one of the several social institutions that both affects and is affected by the political system. There is fairly consistent evidence that in capitalist societies committed to democratic processes, schooling socializes the young into the system, instills in them greater political awareness, and recruit...
Chapter
This chapter describes the evaluation of education in development policy. Most concerns about the relationship between education and processes of change and development is some kind of potential for reform. Even if a school system is achieving its desired educational objectives, there is always the possibility that the task can be done more effecti...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on the question of educational reforms. The term reform is frequently used in a vague and diffuse way and is usually defined as an attempt to change things for the better in a country or a part of a country, particularly its population. Despite of very thorough educational reforms, the formal educational systems of today do not...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the various kinds of relationships between education and development. Dialectics as a logical principle assumes that contradictions and their resolutions in either systems of knowledge or in history are necessary if progress is to be achieved. To unravel the complexity which seems to surround the education-development debate,...
Chapter
This chapter presents the relationship between education, economic growth, and development. The problem of education is not only that it is both determined and a determinant of the society in which it is located, but those other factors likewise contribute to the mobilization of human resources. Looking ahead to future needs with respect to educati...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the link between education and development. It presents the examination of the concept of development along with the conviction that no discussion of education strategies can be effective without first clarifying the desired development strategy. There have been few concepts in social and economic thought that have been as am...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the education, modernization, and quality of life. Apart from the discussion of basic human needs, there is little doubt that the process of modernization as experienced by individuals has brought about increasing control over, and the rationalization of, many aspects of the human condition. Organization for Economic Cooperat...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on three aspects of the relationship between education and development. The first of these concerns the tendency to regard education in a deterministic manner, thus exaggerating its potential for change. The second concerns the contradictions for society and for individuals inherent in rapid educational expansion, and the third...

Citations

... Osuji (2011) suggests education is the bedrock of development in any nation and sustainable educational development is the foundation and building blocks of sustainable socio economic development. Fagerlind and Saha (1983) claimed that education is seen as most important in the improvement of human capital among all the known inputs in economic growth of a nation. ...
... This rate of return reflects a relationship between education, economic growth and employment for individuals and social development (Fagerlind & Saha, 1983). The strong relationship is usually seen in developed countries where significant expenditure is spent on education. ...
... Yet, the link between education and socio-economic development is not new. Particularly since the post-World War II era, education has increasingly been conceptualized as key to achieving economic advancement and social mobility (Fägerlind and Saha, 1989;Stromquist and Monkman, 2000;Chabbott and Ramirez, 2006). In the era of globalization, often referred to as the "knowledge economy," and the emergence of neoliberal economics, countries now participate, willingly or unwillingly, in an increasingly competitive global economy, where knowledge is considered key to successful participation. ...
... For Indigenous peoples, education as an instrument of the colonizer is inextricable from exploitation of Indigenous lands and natural resources, law and governance over Indigenous communities, and the daily rhetoric regarding how human beings should look, think, and operate in a world they dominate. Furthermore, in the era of the modern nation-state, the link between national political agendas and educational development in various global contexts is well established (Fagerlind & Saha, 1989). e Peruvian state education system was, by design, restrictive and elitist under colonial rule, mimicking the racial hierarchies of Peruvian society, with the Spanish elites, their descendants, and other white European immigrants at the top. ...
... The paradigm of the formal education is the style of schooling developed in the industrialized West where it has been defined as any form of education that is deliberate, carried on, "out of context in a special setting outside of the routines of daily life, and made the responsibility of the larger social group" (Strauss, 1984). Formal education is known as an important instrument of preserving the cultural security of a nation because it aims to keep the cultural identity and social control alive and to protect the values and traditions of a nation (Thomas, 1983;Fagerlind and Saha, 1989;Burns, 1997). The informal education, however, is not often censored by the state authorities. ...