Houda Asal's research while affiliated with École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales and other places

Publications (3)

Article
Islamophobia: the making of a new concept. The current state of academic research This review of research on Islamophobia starts from the observation of an increase in the number of publications on this subject in English in recent years, compared to a low interest in French university studies. As a first step, it aims to make a critical assessment...
Article
The author analyses the presence of Lebanese organizations on the Web and shows the transnational links between associations from different countries, starting from a case study that includes France and Canada. The nature and density of these connections are partly attributable to the importance of linguistic, religious and/or political factors. Th...
Article
With the aim of developing a better understanding of the history of the Arab presence in Canada, this analysis of the first forms of collective expression in ethnic journals brings to light traces of identity construction as well as the political mobilization of these immigrants in their new country. This case study examines The Canadian Arab, publ...

Citations

... The recent resurgence of the term Islamophobia appears to underscore the (re)production of a familiar sentimental element between Europe and Arabia with the former emphasizing Arab cultural differences as ontologically threatening thereby essentially repudiating the idea of Arabs and Muslims as "rational subjects" capable of developing or informing a civil society-thus fundamentally denying them legal sovereignty (Tuastad 2003;Beckett 2003;Al-Azmeh 2009;Altwaiji 2014;Kerboua 2016). It is important to note that Islamophobia is more than simply a critique of the Islamic faith but rather is a neologism that literally means the "irrational fear of the Muslim faith" which is expressed through factors relating to apprehension, fear, rejection, and hatred (CAIR 2010;Asal 2014;Mohammed 2014;Kerboua 2016, p. 23). According to Mohammed (2014) and Kerboua (2016, p. 24), neo-Oriental discursive components are essentially informed by an "ontological fear" constructing an essentialist "Arab-Muslim problem" in Western societies. ...
... Ignacio (2005), in her study of the Filipino Diaspora, explored how this group has used the Internet and computer-mediated communication particularly, newsgroup debates, list servers, and website postings, as platforms to build relationships and communities and to create and reinforce their national ethnic and racial identity. Asal (2012), in a study of Lebanese Diasporas concluded that these new technologies have enabled immigrants to create and sustain links with their homeland, host country, and each other, share information, and organize transnational networks (Brettell 2007;Graziano 2012;Nurse 2000;Smith and Bakker 2008;Tekwani 2003;Enteen 2006). ...