Hirokazu Suzuki's research while affiliated with Nagoya University and other places

Publications (10)

Article
The bio-logging technique is extensively used in the fields of ecology and ethology, wherein a data logger, such as a sensor or camera, is attached to the target animal’s body to collect the required data. In this method, the efficiency of recovery of the data logger is not ideal. In this study, we proposed a new recovery method, with the aim of ad...
Article
Omnivorous gulls (Laridae) are known to feed on insects. Few studies have reported, however, how, when, and where they do so. In this study, we attached a GPS-video logger to Black-tailed Gulls Larus crassirostris during the breeding season. Video recordings were obtained of gulls capturing flying insects over land and sea. Some insects were identi...
Article
Pelagic seabirds have evolved physiological and morphological characteristics that enable them to fly in an energy efficient manner over the oceans. Although there are some exceptions (e.g., Delord et al. 2020), most species come ashore only to breed or rest. However, recent tracking technologies have revealed some unexpected overland journeys. For...
Article
In ecology and ethology, a technique called ‘bio-logging’ has been used to record the behaviour of wild animals by attaching a small logger, which includes a global positioning system (GPS) or acceleration sensor, to the animal of interest. This method's disadvantage is that the recovery of the logger is inefficient. In this study, we propose a dat...
Article
Full-text available
Unravelling the secrets of wild animals is one of the biggest challenges in ecology, with bio-logging (i.e., the use of animal-borne loggers or bio-loggers) playing a pivotal role in tackling this challenge. Bio-logging allows us to observe many aspects of animals’ lives, including their behaviours, physiology, social interactions, and external env...
Preprint
Animal-borne data loggers, i.e., biologgers, allow researchers to record a variety of sensor data from animals in their natural environments. This data allows biologists to observe many aspects of the animals' lives, including their behavior, physiology, social interactions, and external environment. However, the need to limit the size of these dev...
Article
In the research of animal ecology, there is a method of attaching a compact data logger (hereinafter logger) to an animal and recording the behavior, physiological state of the animal itself, environment to be experienced, serial data with some time period, and so on.This method is called Bio-logging. Currently, navigational research to capture the...
Article
Wildlife migration is a spectacular phenomenon [1]. Studies using telemetry — tracking devices attached on free-living animals — have shown that large topographic barriers and obstacles, such as oceans and deserts, elicit extreme feats of migration [2]. Overcoming the challenges of these obstacles might require experience and skill that young indiv...

Citations

... In the same hour another storm can be observed to the west. direct risk of collision and uncontrolled landings in extreme winds [as reported for procellariiformes during a 1984 storm in South Africa (13)], to the limited capacity to take-off once grounded, and their susceptibility to predators, including crows and raptors (28,29). ...
... This device can be engaged at the desired time from a remote position through wireless communication. The feasibility of the device is verified in actual environments, by a separation experiment under various temperatures and for waterproof performance, which indicates that it is ideal for use in actual environments [18]. ...
... For example, one could downsample the high-resolution image-based data to determine the optimal sampling frequency for bio-logging studies, using the videos to verify that the resulting data capture the target behaviours. Recording the behaviour of instrumented animals could also provide sensor ground truth data and aid in the development of more energy efficient, behaviourally activated sensors (Korpela et al., 2020;Yu et al., 2021). (Koci et al., 2020) or resource quality and accessibility (Jennewein et al., 2021) which would also be informative for analysing recorded animal behaviour. ...
... In this study, we present an example of the application of newly developed separation device to the black-tailed gull. The logger is usually recovered by recapturing the bird in its nest [23,24], which requires considerable skills and time (i.e. 5-10 min). ...
... Animal ecology and behaviour change, however, with season, so movement-based power harvesting systems which might work for a migrating bird may fail postmigration, so consideration also needs to be given to animal habits as well as the changes in available ambient energy (such as daylight length in solar cell systems). Finally, smart programming can also help extend the life of tags by dutycycling or simply not recording data when the animal is quiescent [66]. ...
... Although its mechanisms may differ from those in other taxa, there is some evidence for the existence of magnetoreception in procellariiforms. Shearwaters fledging from a colony on the north side of Japan crossed its treacherous mountainous interior on a direct southward route toward their wintering grounds instead of circumnavigating the island in either direction, as experienced adults did (Yoda et al., 2017), indicating an innate compass sense (and one that adults can override with experience). Some fledgling procellariiforms also appear to imprint to the geomagnetic field, influencing their eventual nesting locations (Putman, 2020;Wynn et al., 2020). ...