Helen Moewaka Barnes's research while affiliated with Massey University and other places

Publications (56)

Article
In Aotearoa New Zealand, the arrival of imperial ideologies in the 19th century led to devastating land-loss and cultural marginalisation for Māori at the hands of settlers and successive governments. This article examines the damaging effects of a Crown-imposed treaty claims settlement system designed to address injustices inflicted on Māori. Inte...
Article
Complex multidimensional challenges have prompted a transformational shift towards holistic research integration with knowledge systems differing from conventional science. Embracing diverse ontological and epistemological approaches through new styles of collaboration, dialogue and practice enables durable solutions and desired outcomes. As societ...
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This commentary discusses the framing of the production of a series of online text-based and visual resources aimed at researchers embarking on Indigenous and non-Indigenous research partnerships, and in particular supporting non-Indigenous researchers to think about our/their methods, assumptions and behaviour. We identify the tension in mainstrea...
Article
Kaupapa Māori methodologies in Aotearoa New Zealand have often been applied to content of immediate and direct relevance to Māori communities. Some of these include research about aspects of cultural revitalisation or examinations of the position Māori occupy within broader ethnic disparities, particularly in health and social outcomes. This articl...
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Colonisation has deeply harmed Maori communities, seriously and consistently undermining their vitality, aspirations and potentials, particularly since the 1860s, at inestimable cost to the entire nation. The British arrival in Aotearoa commenced a relationship between two very different peoples that has profoundly influenced their distinct and col...
Article
This article explores affect, colonial privilege, and the cultural politics of national commemoration in Aotearoa New Zealand. Based on focus‐group interviews around two major national days, we examine means through which feelings and emotions are deployed in ways that enable the reproduction of social advantage. Situating affect within patterns of...
Article
Focus group interviews conducted with Aotearoa New Zealand–born Pasifika young adults aged 18–25 years highlighted their intense apprehension about the diminishing abilities of New Zealand–born Pasifika people to speak their ancestral/heritage Pasifika languages in Aotearoa. Some Pasifika languages are also declining at their homeland wellsprings....
Article
Connections and belonging to ancestral lands are strongly and consistently argued as fundamental to Māori education, health and wellbeing. When our connections with and access to health-promoting places of belonging are damaged, we lose more than component parts of wellbeing. An entire cultural infrastructure integral to identity, community, spirit...
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Work that addresses the cumulative impacts of resource extraction on environment, community, and health is necessarily large in scope. This paper presents experiences from initiating research at this intersection and explores implications for the ambitious, integrative agenda of planetary health. The purpose is to outline origins, design features,...
Article
The healthcare system is complex and challenging to virtually everyone but more so to those who are marginalised, impoverished, and isolated—all factors that exacerbate health literacy barriers. This article reports on an analysis of qualitative data collected for a kaupapa Māori evaluation of a Cardiovascular Disease Medications Health Literacy In...
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The healthcare system is complex and challenging to virtually everyone but more so to those who are marginalised, impoverished, and isolated—all factors that exacerbate health literacy barriers. This article reports on an analysis of qualitative data collected for a kaupapa Māori evaluation of a Cardiovascular Disease Medications Health Literacy In...
Article
The English Laws Act, passed in 1858, declared the Laws of England applicable in New Zealand and cemented the hitherto alien ideology of land as property. Part of this ideology was the separation of tangata from whenua along with the separation of ownership of land from ownership of water. Māori, as tangata whenua – people of the land, made no such...
Article
This paper investigates affective–discursive dimensions of nation‐building via commemorations of nationhood within Aotearoa New Zealand to ask about how these assemblages construct feeling trajectories for citizen participants. We report auto‐ethnographic analyses of participation in specific Anzac Day war remembrance events that occurred in the ca...
Chapter
The intense choreography of a nation’s identity is often exhibited through national days. In Aotearoa, New Zealand, national events such as Waitangi Day (6 February) and Anzac Day (25 April) provide affective public spaces that engage identity, belonging and inclusion while evoking dissent, reverence, unity and division. In this chapter, we analyse...
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Historical trauma is an important and growing area of research that provides crucial insights into the antecedents of current-day inequities in health and social wellbeing experienced by Indigenous people in colonial settler societies. What is not so readily examined is the flip side of historical trauma experienced by settlers and their descendant...
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The interpretation and practice of kaupapa Māori evaluation (KME) take many forms, each involving its own set of considerations, challenges and outcomes. This paper explores the complexities involved in a collaborative journey through an evaluation project where KME was a guiding principle, highlighting its successes and challenges. The evaluation...
Article
Wairua, a Maori (indigenous peoples of Aotearoa New Zealand) concept, somewhat restrictively translated as spirit or spirituality, resonates with many indigenous peoples globally. While spirit is recognised as an important human dimension, the denigration of non-western spiritual understandings means that indigenous peoples often choose to remain s...
Book
Youth Drinking Cultures in a Digital World focuses on how pervasive social networking technologies contribute to drinking cultures. It brings together international contributions from leading researchers in this emerging field to explore how new technologies are reconfiguring the key themes, traditional interests, practices and concerns of alcohol-...
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Clinical engagement is often removed from everyday social processes familiar to Māori (indigenous people of Aotearoa [New Zealand]), as it can focus on health consumerism rather than communication and connection. The health encounter is not a routine social engagement, patients often feel unwell and experience a range of emotions; feeling unsure, v...
Article
In Aotearoa New Zealand, Māori aspirations around land and water conflict with settler interests. As indigenous people, Māori struggle to enact agency over resources, despite Treaty (Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi is an 1840 agreement between Maori and the crown) settlement processes returning some lands. Returns are complex since changes...
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Young adults regularly engage in heavy drinking episodes with friends and share these practices via digital images and ongoing interactions on social media. This study explored the meanings and values that young adults attach to Facebook social media photo-sharing practices around drinking and socializing, and how these practices were gendered, in...
Article
This article explores affect, discourse and emotion in national life. Drawing on recent thinking on discourse and affect, alongside previous work on nation and communities of practice, we focus on the print media’s use of Anzac Day in Aotearoa New Zealand, as a site through which settler identity and cultural hegemony are reproduced. One hegemonic...
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INTRODUCTION: New Zealand children's physical activity, including independent mobility and active travel, has declined markedly over recent decades. The Neighbourhoods for Active Kids (NfAK) study examines how neighbourhood built environments are associated with the independent mobility, active travel, physical activity and neighbourhood experience...
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Introduction New Zealand children's physical activity, including independent mobility and active travel, has declined markedly over recent decades. The Neighbourhoods for Active Kids (NfAK) study examines how neighbourhood built environments are associated with the independent mobility, active travel, physical activity and neighbourhood experiences...
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Young people are often accused of being foolhardy for posting photos on Facebook that depict drinking and intoxication. However, in this article, we argue young people’s predilection for posting Facebook drinking photos must be understood in relation to Facebook’s specific architecture and affordances, and is symptomatic of new forms of online soci...
Article
Young people are often accused of being foolhardy for posting photos on Facebook that depict drinking and intoxication. However, in this article, we argue young people’s predilection for posting Facebook drinking photos must be understood in relation to Facebook’s specific architecture and affordances, and is symptomatic of new forms of online soci...
Chapter
Background: New Zealand has unusual patterns of recreational substance use by international standards including low levels of cocaine and heroin use, and high methamphetamine use. Aims: This paper examines recent trends in alcohol and other drug use among police detainees in New Zealand over the past six years. Method: The paper utilises data...
Article
This article explores how affect and discourse intertwine. We analyse a corpus of newspaper editorials and comment pieces from 2013 to 2014 concerning Aotearoa New Zealand's national day investigating how affective-discursive practices are mobilised to 'cover the nation' and 'settle space'. We identify pervasive formulations of 'bitter Maori' and '...
Article
Our New Zealand-based research provides new insights, drawn from focus group and interview data gathered from 18- to 25-year-olds, about how alcohol use and technology converge in drinking and drunkenness while online. Alcohol consumption is a key source of harm and damage to population health, particularly for young people whose engagement with we...
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The practice of pre-loading—drinking large amounts of alcohol rapidly in private spaces prior to socialising in the night-time economy—has come to notice recently in the study of alcohol-related harm, but no studies have explored these phenomena in Aotearoa New Zealand. We used a theoretical framework developed with public health alcohol studies fo...
Article
Consuming alcohol to intoxication is a commonplace leisure-time activity among young people in Aotearoa New Zealand, producing a formidable suite of harms and consequences that are proving challenging to redress. Youth drinking cultures are similar to those observed in Western Europe, where processes of globalization are increasingly “homogenizing”...
Article
This paper explores affect, discourse and emotion in national life. We focus on the print media’s use of Waitangi Day as an affective-discursive distribution channel maintaining and reinforcing the hegemony of settler culture. Applying new thinking around affect, we consider how the cultural production of emotion in print media privileges settler i...
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Colonial praxis has been imposed on the culture, epistemologies and praxis of indigenous Maori in Aotearoa, entrenching the settler cultural project that ensures the continuation of the colonial state, producing damaging disparities. This article theorises ways in which settler privilege works at multiple levels supporting settler interests, aspira...
Book
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Young adults in Aotearoa/New Zealand (NZ) regularly engage in heavy drinking episodes with groups of friends within a collective culture of intoxication to ‘have fun’ and ‘be sociable’. This population has also rapidly increased their use of new social networking technologies (e.g. mobile camera/ video phones; Facebook and YouTube) and are said to...
Article
Pain is subjective and is therefore a complex and difficult health issue to address. In-depth understanding is required for improvements to be made in how it is managed. Research suggests that culture plays a role in pain experiences, but very little such research has been conducted in Aotearoa (New Zealand). Significant health disparities exist be...
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A study of the literature on mental health promotion suggests that to a far greater extent than ‘physical’ health concerns, mental health seems to be dominated by the illness focus of established clinical perspectives and practices. In Aotearoa/New Zealand this leaves little in the way of conceptual space or fiscal resources for the development of...
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Physical activity is essential for optimal physical and psychological health but substantial declines in children's activity levels have occurred in New Zealand and internationally. Children's independent mobility (i.e., outdoor play and traveling to destinations unsupervised), an integral component of physical activity in childhood, has also decli...
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Action Research can be a powerful tool for change and improvement in health services for indigenous people when utilised within an appropriate framework. The project Maori Utilisation & Experience of Ischaemic Heart Disease Management illustrates this convergence in its use of Kaupapa Maori Action Research methods in its efforts to improve the heal...
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:Objective: An initial exploration of the available conceptualizations of privilege in Aotearoa/New Zealand with the goal of developing a more in-depth qualitative study, incorporating kaupapa Maori and public health framings.Design: Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of key informants that span the academic, community development, h...
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Marketing has successfully used the postmodern turn in conceptualisations of the human subject and incorporated contemporary theorising of identities and self into its understanding of the key drivers of consumption. Such developments clearly converge in alcohol marketing practices that target young people, where commercialised youth identities ava...
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Alcohol consumption among young people in New Zealand is on the rise. Given the broad array of acute and chronic harms that arise from this trend, it is a major cause for alarm and it is imperative that we improve our knowledge of key drivers of youth drinking. Changes wrought by the neoliberal political climate of deregulation that characterised t...
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Requirements for non‐Maori researchers to consult with Maori compete with “by Maori for Maori” research agendas. Nevertheless, Maori provide varying forms of consultation, with Maori perspectives rarely being entered into the literature. Following an invitation from the Centre for Social Health Outcomes Research and Evaluation (SHORE), members of t...
Article
This paper examines the culturally specific experiences of belonging within Oruāmo/Beachhaven, a suburb in North Shore City. In-depth interviews with 32 caregivers of young children expose the fact that the ethnic groups represented – Māori, Samoan and Pākehā– vary in their uses and understandings of, as well as feelings for, residential neighbourh...
Article
This paper draws on a qualitative action research investigation of the treatment of Māori with ischaemic heart disease, in the course of which interview data were gathered from individual patients and health care providers. Thematic analysis is used to describe clinicians’ discourses around uptake of medical advice by Māori patients. We contrast th...
Article
Full-text available
Action Research can be a powerful tool for change and improvement in health services for indigenous people when utilised within an appropriate framework. The project Maori Utilisation & Experience of Ischaemic Heart Disease Manage- ment illustrates this convergence in its use of Kaupapa Maori Action Research methods in its efforts to improve the he...
Article
Full-text available
Photovoice is an innovative approach to social science research that combines photographic images and participants’ explanations to document social issues. At Clendon and Mangere the research team from Whāriki Research Group worked with groups of young people to gather images, articulate their significance and create powerpoint presentations for us...
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This paper considers linkages between contemporary marketing theory and practice, and emerging conceptualizations of identity, to discuss implications for public health concerns over alcohol use among young people. Particular attention is paid to the theorizing of consumption as a component of youth identities and the ways in which developments of...
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This report presents an overview of the two-year; Health Research Council-funded project Theorising Youth Mental Health Promotion (HRC 00/256). The research aims related to this report were to: •Gather accounts of what constitutes mental health from young people of Maori, Samoan and Pakeha ethnicity in Counties/Manukau. •Investigate the experienc...

Citations

... There are thus many "whats" that need to be better integrated into conservation, including decision science, human dimensions, and economic perspectives, among others. The theory and practice of conservation thus requires recognition of the complex interplay among humans and the environment, and integration of knowledge and methodologies across disciplines and sectors [113][114]. Transdisciplinary methodologies have emerged as critical to conducting successful, solutions-oriented environmental research [30,115]. ...
... The pandemic has exacerbated already high levels of deprivation amongst the most vulnerable. However, there is also a strong belief that the pandemic represents a unique opportunity for profound change in the 'new normal'; as Kukutai et al (2020) state "the recovery cannot be a return to the inequalities of the normal. Rather, the opportunity is to collectively and courageously re-imagine our futures and address unjust and unsustainable inequities" (p. ...
... For example, I have been asked to archive some audio files of the interviews for future generations, share preliminary findings on an iwi radio station and meet with aspiring local entrepreneurs in a small community, and I am poised to write a report separate to my thesis for the communities involved in the research. Including participants in this way allows Māori and Aboriginal people to have legitimacy as research partners, to share their truths and see the results of their contribution to the research process and outcomes on their own terms (Borell et al., 2019). ...
... Namely that of a duty to spread Christianity and civilisation to heathen and savage peoples (Waswo, 1996). Although 'race' relations in Aotearoa started out with trade and diplomacy, it evolved into unjust treatment towards Māori when resources and power weren't able to be acquired through diplomatic means (Barnes & McCreanor, 2019 ;McCreanor, 1997). ...
... The crypt is a way of explaining the trickiness of these competing memory regimes. Settler students in particular can be brought into direct relationship with death and destruction from the colonial era through uncanny pedagogies that make tribal memories of colonial injustice visible and viscerally felt (Gelder & Jacobs, 1998;McConville et al., 2020). Educators can engage the uncanny through the strategic interplay of place, people, objects, practices, and narrative, to bring together a series of temporal frames comprising the historical past and an uncertain and nebulous present where much has been misremembered about what has taken place (Somerville, 2010). ...
... The steady decline of heritage language use, the lack of intergenerational language transmission and the shift to English among Pacific Islanders in Australia and New Zealand has long been apparent (McCaffery & McFall-McCaffery, 2010). The low self-esteem and identity insecurity that often follows the loss of heritage languages has also been well documented (Samu, et al., 2019). Therefore, our discussion of the literature that informed our study focuses on the value of bilingual language programmes for children's early years development. ...
... Finally, rangatahi emphasised the importance of being-in-relation to deities, places and the natural world. While nature could be a source of peace and connection, rangatahi also talked about the distress and worry they experienced faced with climate devastation and biodiversity loss (Moewaka Barnes et al. 2019;Hutchings 2020). These accounts affirm the primacy of te tai ao for wellbeing, and the importance of meaningful environmental and climate action for securing rangatahi hauora, now and into the future. ...
... Most industries in the world depend on minerals and mineral products, and for this reason mining is carried out in nearly every country [27], often leaving behind a range of environmental and social disturbances [28]. The scope, scale and systemic nature of resource extraction (e.g., mining) makes it difficult to comprehensively assess its overall impacts on nature, human health and societies [29]. ...
... A substantial body of research worldwide has identified inequities in health between and across ethnic groups, establishing that minority ethnic groups typically have poorer health and wellbeing outcomes than majority ethnic groups (Nazroo & Williams, 2006;Segall & Fries, 2011). In New Zealand, research about ethnicity has largely been directed at the persistent and ongoing health and wellbeing inequities experienced by Māori [indigenous New Zealanders] compared with Tauiwi [non-Māori] (Carlson et al., 2019). Such disparities are typically understood as arising from monocultural approaches to health and wellbeing that fail to engage with Māori values and perspectives, and which constitute an ongoing breach of the partnership between Māori and British settlers enshrined in Te Tiriti o Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi (Came et al., 2017). ...
... These factors have informed and expanded my reference to the Taieri and the Nechako as "eco-social" elders: what has been experienced in these river catchments, and within their watershed boundaries, is also a reflection of the history I have come to experience and live among as a citizen of Aotearoa/NZ, and an immigrant and recent citizen of Canada. Comparing and learning across rivers in Canada and Oceania, in particular, has provided me a platform to learn from an array of historical, colonial, governance, ecological, Indigenous, linguistic and sociodemographic commonalities, and differences (Anderson et al., 2012;Carter, 2019; Moewaka Barnes, Eich, & Yessilth, 2018;Parkes et al., 2019). Lessons from the Taieri on the complexities of catchment management and governance (Parkes, 2015) have created a basis for application, adaptation and refinement in the Nechako context (e.g., Gislason et al., 2018;Picketts et al., 2016Picketts et al., , 2020. ...