Harmen O. Huigens's research while affiliated with Leiden University and other places

Publications (9)

Article
This paper calls attention to the presence of countless ancient paths on the basalt-covered surfaces characteristic of harra landscapes in north-eastern Jordan. These paths have developed over the course of at least the last two millennia, and potentially prior to that, by trafficking of nomadic peoples and animals. These paths facilitated movement...
Article
In June 2013, an archaeological survey was carried out in the Hazimah plains, situated in the Jebel Qurma region of north-eastern Jordan. These plains surround the so-called Black Desert or harra, which has been known to contain an extremely rich archaeological and epigraphic record. In contrast to the harra, little is known about the archaeology o...
Article
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Recent fieldwork in the Jebel Qurma region, in the basalt wasteland east of Azraq, revealed a large number of prehistoric sites, dating from the 7th to the late 4th millennia cal BC. While some sites were little more than lithic scatters over a few dozen square metres, others were of impressive size, up to 8 hectares in extent and characterized by...
Chapter
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Artikel in: Waar de geschiedenis begon. Nederlandse onderzoekers in de ban van spijkerschrift, hiërogliefen en aardewerk. Uitgave naar aanleiding van het 75-jarig bestaan van het Nederlands Instituut voor het Nabije Oosten, 1939-2014. Onder redactie van O.E. Kaper en J.G. Dercksen. ISBN: 978-90-6258-248-8
Article
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This article presents the remains of a T-shaped burnt building found in trench V6 in Operation II at Late Neolithic Tell Sabi Abyad, Syria. The burnt building closely resembles the so-called Burnt Village excavated earlier at Tell Sabi Abyad in Operation I, level 6, but is slightly older: 6050-6020 BC. Many objects were discovered in the ruins of...

Citations

... Betts and Martin [169] have suggested that Chalcolithic sites exist in the harra (basalt desert) and hamad (limestone desert) of Jordan but that these have frequently gone unrecognized in earlier surveys due to a lack of good diagnostic material. Recent work has, however, identified several sites from northern, southeastern, and eastern Jordan that demonstrate continued pastoralist use of the landscape into the Chalcolithic period encompassing the 6 kya time slice [170][171][172][173]. This includes sites like Tell al-Hibr [169], with faunal evidence for a potential mixed subsistence strategy of herding and hunting as in earlier periods. ...
... The desert regions of the Arabian Peninsula and Levant are crisscrossed by innumerable pathways, often identifiable on the ground and even more so from the air by visible erosion, stone clearance and wear. Whilst some have likely been formed by wild ungulates or free-roaming domesticates, others evidence the movement of people and their herd animals across these landscapes, from the distant past through to the present (Huigens, 2018). The same regions also preserve millions of drystone Holocene monuments, known collectively to Bedouin as 'the works of the old men' (Kennedy, 2011(Kennedy, , 2020Maitland, 1927). ...
... It seems to prove that people of the PN period generally continued to bury their dead within the confines of their settlements, as per prior custom, beneath the floors or between residential structures. However, at a few sites, special locations designated as burial grounds or 'cemeteries' appear to have emerged for the first time during this period in sites such as Tell el-Kerkh (Tsuneki 2010a(Tsuneki , 2011(Tsuneki , 2013Jammo and Tsuneki 2020) and Tell Sabi Abyad (Akkermans 2008;Akkermans et al. 2014;Plug, Plicht and Akkermans 2014). ...
... LC/EBA material was not confined to the enclosures but also extended to the limestone hilltops and their slopes, characterised by small but distinctive lithic scatters without architecture. At least one of these places served as a knapping site, with many cores and debitage pieces loosely spread over an area of roughly one hectare (cf.Akkermans et al. 2014, 200-202;Huigens 2015). The sites clearly show that LC/EBA settlement was not restricted to the basalt expanse proper but also included the persistent exploitation of the adjacent hamad plains. ...
... Elles sont observables à l'échelle d'objets mobiles, ou plus exactement déplaçables. À Tell Sabi Abyad, on a trouvé dans des couches d'incendie du néolithique tardif (vers -6050 EC) plus d'une centaine de scellements brisés (Akkermans, Brüning et al. 2012), qui prouvent une pratique du contrôle d'accès exclusif à des objets de petite taille déposés à l'intérieur de conteneurs en céramique (on fabrique de la poterie à cette époque) ou en vannerie ( fig.9-10). Les scellements, qui sont des mottes de terre portant des impressions de sceaux gravés ( fig.11), ont conservé la trace des ouvertures des récipients qui furent scellés. ...