Haim Omer's research while affiliated with Tel Aviv University and other places

Publications (97)

Article
Full-text available
Current forms of parent training for childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are often insufficient. Many families drop out of the training, and treatment gains are often not maintained. Nonviolent resistance parent training (NVR) focuses on helping parents resist the child's negative behaviors without escalating the problem. NVR...
Article
Full-text available
Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes are at an elevated risk for reduced self-care and imbalanced blood sugar rates with long-term medical consequences. Despite the medical concern, there is a shortage of effective parenting-based interventions for this condition. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the applicability and effectiveness of a New Authority...
Article
The goal of this study is to integrate two areas in recent clinical theory, research, and practice: family accommodation and non-violent resistance (NVR). Family accommodation describes changes that family members make to their own behavior, to help their relative who is dealing with psychopathology to avoid or alleviate distress related to the dis...
Article
Study objectives: This study tested whether parental cry tolerance (PCT) and distress-attribution cognitions predict outcomes of behavioral interventions for infant sleep problems. It additionally examined intervention effects on these parental factors. Methods: Participants were 91 infants aged 9-18 months (61% boys) with sleep related problems...
Article
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Background The development of mindfulness parenting programs in recent years offers a promising direction for targeting parental emotional dysregulation in families of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Nevertheless, research on the effectiveness of mindfulness parenting programs is limited, and little is known about the...
Article
Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate a training in non-violent resistance (NVR) for foster parents who take care of a foster child (ages 6-18) with externalizing problem behavior. Methods A randomized controlled trial was used to compare an intervention group (NVR, n = 31) with a treatment as usual control group (TAU, n = 31). The NVR-in...
Article
In this review, the principles of nonviolent resistance (NVR) and studies examining its acceptability and efficacy are reviewed. Originating in the sociopolitical field, NVR has been adapted for numerous settings including parents of youth with externalizing and other problems, foster parents, teachers and school personnel, and caregivers of psychi...
Article
Parental monitoring was once considered to be the approved way for preventing risk behaviors by children and adolescents. In the last years, however, the concept has been the target of cogent criticism questioning the interpretation of findings which support the traditional view of monitoring. After reviewing the various criticisms and the resultin...
Article
Anxiety disorders are common across the lifespan, cause severe distress and impairment, and usually have their onset in childhood. Substantial clinical and epidemiological research has highlighted important parental influences in the development, maintenance and clinical course of these disorders. Research on the pathways and mechanisms underlying...
Article
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A ‘dependence trap’ between parents and young adults with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (HF-ASD) develops when parents accommodate to the needs of their grown-up child in ways that may hinder development and cause distress. Non-Violent Resistance (NVR) parent training may help parents reduce their accommodation, manage arising conflicts...
Article
Foster care faces serious challenges, such as behavioral problems in foster children and parental stress and ineffective parenting behavior in foster parents. The results of a pilot study that evaluated a training program for foster parents based on nonviolent resistance are described. In a pretest-posttest design, data were collected from 25 famil...
Article
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Vigilant care aims at reducing adolescent risk behaviors while matching parental involvement to the level of alarm signs. This study examined the effect of parent training in vigilant care and technological feedback on driving risk of novice male drivers. A sample of 217 Israeli families was divided into four conditions: a) no-feedback, b) individu...
Article
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Parent training in nonviolent resistance was adapted to deal with situations of suicide threat by children, adolescents, and young adults. The approach aims at reducing the risk potential and the mutual distress surrounding the threat-interaction. Parent training in nonviolent resistance has been shown to help parents move from helplessness to pres...
Article
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Training in non-violent resistance has been adapted to help parents cope with suicide threats from adolescents or young adults. The treatment helps parents move from helplessness to presence, from isolation to connectedness, from submission to resistance, from escalation to self-control, and from mutual distancing and hostility to care and support....
Chapter
School refusal is a common problem often associated with childhood anxiety disorders. Parents feel helpless in the face of a child's refusal to attend school, and therapists can help return a child to school and restore the parents' sense of efficacy. This chapter discusses the prevalence of school refusal and the relationship between school refusa...
Article
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This study examines the impact of the provision of feedback and guidance about parental monitoring on the safety performance of young male drivers during their first year of driving. The research used an in-vehicle data recorder (IVDR), which documented events of extreme gravitational forces measured in the vehicles that participated in the experim...
Article
Parents of violent children, who underwent training in nonviolent resistance (NVR), were compared with a wait-list control. Each parent reported on him/herself as well as on the other parent. Although both parents reported significant improvements in measures of parental helplessness, only fathers reported significant improvements on three scales m...
Chapter
Medication can be an effective way to treat childhood anxiety. The decision to use medication is complex and requires careful consideration. This chapter discusses the use of medication for the treatment of anxiety and presents information on some common medications. It also demonstrates the way in which medication can be combined with cognitive be...
Chapter
A child's anxiety disorder has the potential not only to impact the healthy boundaries between the parents and the anxious child but also to place considerable stress on other family-system dynamics. Parents' ability to cooperate collaboratively between themselves as well as dilemmas relating to additional children in the family are both examples o...
Chapter
Self-regulation describes the system by which an individual returns to a state of equilibrium after an event has caused a disruption in some element of functioning. This chapter explores the relationship between childhood anxiety and emotion regulation, including the parental role in fostering more effective regulation by an anxious child. Both bio...
Chapter
When a child is naturally fearful or is suffering from an anxiety disorder, establishing and maintaining a healthy personal boundary can be particularly challenging. Helping parents to reestablish boundaries and to set healthy limits on their own accessibility to the child can be a major stumbling block to the advance of treatment. This chapter exp...
Chapter
Anxiety disorders are one of the causes of the rising prevalence of highly dependent adult children who live with their parents and who are unable to function independently as mature individuals. In these cases, parents and children are caught in a trap of dependency and mutual frustration. This chapter discusses the phenomenon of growing prevalenc...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the five Session Modules of Supportive Parenting for Anxious Childhood Emotions (SPACE) Program. These modules are strategies for troubleshooting some common obstacles faced in treating childhood anxiety through parent work with the SPACE Program. The five Session Modules include teaching the child anxiety-regulation strategi...
Chapter
Anxiety affects the thought processes in powerful ways, causing children to misinterpret situations, exaggerate their assessments of risk, and focus narrowly on perceived danger. However, cognitions also provide an important key to overcoming anxiety by changing maladaptive thought patterns and learning cognitive skills to battle anxiety. This chap...
Chapter
This chapter presents the treatment process followed in the Supportive Parenting for Anxious Childhood Emotions (SPACE) Program manual. This manual was designed to allow the clinician a blend of structure and flexibility. The treatment follows a structured path, leading to decreased family accommodation of a child's anxiety and to better parental s...
Chapter
Parents of children suffering from anxiety who are reluctant to participate in treatment, such as cognitive behavior therapy or medication, or who have tried these approaches unsuccessfully, often feel an unbearable sense of helplessness, frustration, and exasperation. For parents, seeing their children's limited functioning and emotional distress...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on family accommodation, which is described as the changes made to the family life to reduce a child's anxiety. This particular aspect of family involvement in a child's anxiety has important implications for both individual and family-based treatment. In the context of childhood anxiety, accommodation is most often reported by...
Chapter
Anxiety disorders are common in children and adolescents, and can impact various aspects of healthy functioning and development. Suffering from anxiety can have a devastating and widespread impact on a child and on the family. Physical and mental health, social functioning, academic achievement, family relationships, and overall quality of life can...
Chapter
Anxiety can manifest with various emotions. The cognitive, physiological, and behavioral elements of anxiety are accompanied by an emotional component. Most often, the feeling of fear accompanies anxiety, but other emotions can also play a role such as anger, sadness, or unrest. Learning skills to change or regulate the emotional experience is a wa...
Chapter
Support and protection are two important parental functions. Knowing the difference, when to provide which, and how to do so are major stumbling blocks for parents of anxious children. This chapter explores the differences between the two roles and presents useful ways of encouraging supportive parenting when overprotection has become the rule. A t...
Chapter
Experiencing anxiety involves a cascade of physiological changes that can be distressing. Anxiety affects the body in powerful ways in both the short term and the long term. Physiological elements of anxiety include both acute and chronic effects. For some children, fear of the physical manifestations of anxiety is the major component in the anxiet...
Article
This study focuses on investigating the driving behavior of young novice male drivers during the first year of driving (three months of accompanied driving and the following nine months of solo driving). The study's objective is to examine the potential of various feedback forms on driving to affect young drivers’ behavior and to mitigate the trans...
Article
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Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent disorders of childhood and adolescence. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety poses a challenge for clinicians as it requires active client participation, and many children either decline or do not adequately comply with treatment. In addition, even after treatment with CBT, up to 50% of children re...
Article
Descriptions of parental authority and of the formation of a secure parent-child bond have remained unconnected in conceptualizations about parenting and child development. The parental anchoring function is here presented as an integrative metaphor for the two fields. Parents who fulfill an anchoring function offer a secure relational frame for th...
Article
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"Adult entitled dependence" is a condition characterized by the extreme dependence of grown children on their family and by levels of dysfunction, seemingly excessive in light of their apparent capacity to function. The family and the dependent adult become involved in an interaction in which the very attempts to alleviate the problem may aggravate...
Chapter
A mobilization protocol is presented for helping therapists enlist the active cooperation of fathers, family supporters and school staff in a parent-training program in non-violent resistance. The protocol was shown to considerably improve the capacity of the treatment team to achieve collaboration on a family-school-community level.
Article
Full-text available
OCD is a common disorder in children and adolescents. Disruptive or coercive behaviors among children with OCD have not been a focus of much research until recently. Family accommodation of OCD is strongly related to symptom severity, level of impairment, and treatment outcomes. The possibility of family accommodation being forcefully imposed on fa...
Article
This study explored the nature of disruptive and coercive behaviors in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Thirty children with OCD and a disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) were compared to 30 children with DBD alone using the Child Behavior Checklist and a novel 18-item questionnaire focused on distinctive coercive and disruptive behavi...
Conference Paper
Background: Research has shown that young adults with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders (HFASD) experience difficulties achieving age appropriate goals, such as having peer or intimate relationships, providing for themselves or living independently. As a result, many of them rely on the support of their families. We view this as a "depen...
Conference Paper
Background: Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neuro-developmental condition that has profound effects on individuals' socio-emotional functioning and, as a consequence, on their ability to cope independently. Since the condition is lifelong, continuous care and support for individuals with AS may be needed, alas, support systems for adults with AS are no...
Article
When compared with training in a «TEEN Triple P program» and a waiting control group, does parental coaching in non-violent resistance enhance «parental presence» and de-escalating conflict behavior, while reducing «parental helplessness*? Do parents change their perspectives on the external problem behavior of their adolescent children? The study...
Article
The article discusses the principles of parental presence and non-violent resistance from the perspective of attachment theory. The «new authority» advocated in our model of «parental coaching» revolves not around the control of the child but around the restoration of impaired attachment between parents and their children. The child's awareness of...
Article
A parent-training approach to the treatment of violence against siblings according to the principles of non-violent resistance was developed aiming at resisting the violence, providing protection to the victims and reducing escalation between the parents and the violent child.
Article
Nonviolent resistance (NVR) is a new training model aimed at helping parents deal effectively with their helplessness, isolation, and escalatory interactions with their children. The purpose of this study is to evaluate training in NVR with the parents of children with acute behavior problems. Seventy-three parents (41 families) were randomly assig...
Article
Non-violent resistance and violence among siblings A parent-training approach to the treatment of violence against siblings according to the principles of non-violent resistance was developed aiming at providing protection to the victims, reducing escalation between the parents and the violent child, and propitiating the positive elements in the re...
Book
Throughout human history, the relationships of individuals and groups have been disrupted by what the authors sum up as "demonization," the attribution of basic destructive qualities to the other or to forces within the self. Demonization results in constant suspicion and blame, a systematic disregard of positive events, pressure to eradicate the p...
Article
The authors proposed guidelines for parents of aggressive or violent youths. They insist on the importance of restoring parental presence without subduing the child.
Article
This anti-suicide text provides potential helpers (professional and lay) with clear guidelines for communicating with a declared suicidal person, particularly in real-time situations, when time is crucial and the act cannot be physically prevented. The text also may have a preventative effect when diffused to the public as an anonymous address to p...
Article
From a pluralist perspective, there is no universally correct therapeutic attitude and no set way to deal with troubled therapeutic relationships. A three-factor model of therapeutic impasse is presented in terms of hopeless narratives, failing strategies, and ineffective interactions. This triple mapping allows for the development of a working hyp...
Article
Full-text available
The concept of therapeutic impact was implemented and tested in two treatment studies, the first of smoking and the second of test-anxiety. Two impact factors previously defined, special states and activism, were employed in the creation of impact-enhanced treatment conditions, which were then compared to a basic treatment in each study. The three...
Article
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Discusses hope as not always an asset for the client or the psychotherapist: many difficult conditions can be described as diseases of hope. Hope becomes diseased partially as a function of its unlikelihood, but also when it leads to disparagement of the present, to mindless sacrifices, and to rigid attitudes or behaviors. The authors present the w...
Article
The purpose of this study was to examine systematically our previous clinical impression regarding the prevalence of personality disorders in patients suffering from circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD). We hypothesized that, in a group of patients suffering from CRSD, there would be a higher frequency of personality disorders than in a group of...
Article
The continuity principle stipulates that through all stages of disaster, management and treatment should aim at preserving and restoring functional, historical, and interpersonal continuities, at the individual, family, organization, and community levels. Two misconceptions work against this principle and lead to decisional errors: the "abnormalcy...
Article
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Reviews the misuse of statistical tests in psychotherapy research studies published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology in the years 1967–1968, 1977–1978, and 1987–1988. It focuses on 3 major problems in statistical practice: inappropriate uses of null hypothesis tests and p values, neglect of effect size, and inflation of Type 1...
Article
An Impact Factors Process Scale (IFPS) was developed to assess impact-promoting activities in directive therapy. The IFPS focuses on three major therapist activities: (1) the creation of special, surprising, and arousing events; (2) the attraction of attention; and (3) the mobilization of commitment and effort. The IFPS was shown to be consistent a...
Article
The life-sketch is a highly condensed psychobiography designed to focus and shorten therapy that has recently emerged at different points across the spectrum of therapeutic approaches. It reflects a growing view of psychotherapy as a re-narration of the client's life story. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Article
Describes a quasi-literary aptitude with words, life-stories, and treatment sequences as a major component in the work and formation of the psychotherapist. Spelling out and systematizing therapists' often intuitive mastery of these skills is a necessary step toward better training. This quasi-literary adjunct of psychotherapeutic work is illustrat...
Article
The issue of choosing between a symptomatic and a personal emphasis in psychotherapy has always been one of the major bones of contention between adherents of different approaches in the field. As it becomes increasingly clear that none of the major schools will achieve supremacy, the drive to incorporate whatever is best in any orientation becomes...
Article
Presents a broad-focus model for conceptualizing and treating chronic processes with psychiatric patients that integrates behavioral social-competence approaches and systemic-interactive ones. The events that originate and sustain dysfunctional behaviors involve a cycle of repetitive failure, rejection and hurt, self-isolation and segregation by ot...
Article
Argues that the truth of psychotherapy is not historical, disclosing a real fit between subjective recall and past events, but narrative (D. Spence, 1982). The story of clients' lives, which develops in therapy, is not the real history of the individual, but one possible narrative. Life narrative is inextricably linked to self-concept. Cure in psyc...
Article
This article reviews 252 empirical studies of psychotherapy published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology in the years 1967/1968, 1977/1978, and 1987/1988. Articles were rated on variables related to theoretical relevance, clinical validity and methodology. It is shown that the main trend over this period of time has been a decline...
Article
A pluralist revolution has taken place in psychotherapy, discarding the assumptions that only one theory can be true and that there exists only one method for finding it. Rejecting the anarchistic attitude of "anything goes" as professionally nihilistic, we propose that in the present pluralistic era it is necessary to recognize a multiplicity of p...
Article
Developed a scale to assess 4 potential impact factors (arousal, surprise, effort, and proximity) in different treatments for smoking cessation. 89 dichotomous items were generated from the detailed description of the 4 impact factors. 76 studies (published 1966–1987) involving 210 treatment groups were rated on the 4 impact factors, leading to the...
Article
Defines the functional elements of strategic moves in psychotherapy, and presents case illustrations of dialectical interventions that show the structure of strategic thinking. Strategies are conceptual maps with 3 major components: ways of access to the goal, ways of dealing with resistance, and ways of mobilizing cooperation. Dialectical interven...
Article
Proposes a posttherapy to deal with bad terminations when the client is no longer available for corrective dialogue. It is hypothesized that a bad ending develops out of a negative complementary relationship in which the therapist's actions increase the client's noncooperation and vice-versa in a self-perpetuating loop. The letter attempts to count...
Article
The article presents Shakespeare's Iago as Hell's master therapist. Illustrated with excerpts from the play, the reader is shown how with consummate psychological skills, Iago bends his victims to his will. Step by step he awakens Othello's jealousy, and makes use of the hero's basic insecurity on account of his blackness. Once Othello has determin...
Article
A therapeutic intervention has impact if it reaches the patient's mind and remains available for times of need. Impact is the overcoming of attention, neglect and forgetfulness. Therapists enhance impact by: (a) building up patients' positive attention; (b) creating unusual and discrepant events; (c) strengthening the therapeutic message or the way...
Article
Four major categories of non-specific or common factors are systematically analysed: relationship, expectancy, reorganising, and impact factors. The placebo control method should be discarded in psychotherapy research for two reasons: (a) sham treatment controls are unworkable because common factors in treatment are manifest only when real treatmen...
Article
Argues that strategy fills a real need in psychotherapeutic thinking. An attempt is made to define strategic rules for (1) choosing and defining goals, (2) locating strategic points, (3) actively searching for the client's responses, (4) dealing with resistance, (5) exploiting or creating propitious timings, (6) mobilizing allies, (7) concentrating...
Article
The specifics/nonspecifics issue in psychotherapy has given rise consecutively to three major positions: (a) The systems' position, in which each specific approach to therapy views itself alone as embodying true theory and rightful practice, while rivaling approaches are seen as superficial or unscientific. (b) The nonspecifics' position in which t...
Article
Discusses the reorganization of psychotherapy from a group of dominant schools of thought into a more generalized approach to treatment. It is noted that outcome studies found that all therapies seem to work, with only negligible differences between them. Self-criticism of the 3 major therapy systems (psychoanalysis, behavior therapy, and cognitive...
Article
Zusammenfassung Im Gegensatz zu der herrschenden Meinung, wonach Kinder mit Zwangsstörungen nicht gewalttätig sind, stellte sich heraus, dass 20 % der von Eltern als gewalttätig bezeichneten Kinder unter solchen Störungen litten. Diese kindliche Tyrannei zeigte sich in zwei Erschei-nungsformen: Kinder, die versuchten, jeden Aspekt des Familienleben...
Article
Nahi Alon and Haim Omer claim that narratives in therapy and in popular beliefs illuminate the historical-cultural sources of influence on current ideologies and practices. Master narratives, which have evolved through the ages, influence all our thoughts and actions, as well as clinical theory and practice. In this chapter, two such master narrati...
Article
Zusammenfassung Vorgeschlagen wird ein post-therapeutischer Brief, mit dem auf misslungene Beendigungen reagiert werden kann, wenn der Klient nicht mehr für einen korrigierenden Dialog erreichbar ist. Es wird davon ausgegangen, dass sich ein schlechter Therapieabschluss aus einer negativen komplementären Beziehung entwickelt, in der das Vorgehen de...

Citations

... In this way, improvement of pediatric anxiety could be reached without child-inclusive interventions. The Supportive Parenting for Anxious Childhood Emotions program (SPACE) [25] is an innovative 10-to 12-week parentbased treatment program that is focused on reducing FA without child participation. It can be implemented alone or in conjunction with the child-centered intervention. ...
... Each protocol shares the NA principles and structure but is tailored to meet the unique characteristics of a specific parenting population. Previous studies indicated NA-training to be effective as a parent-only treatment for foster parents (Van Holen et al. 2018), parents of children with externalizing disorders (Weinblatt and Omer 2008), ADHD (Schorr-Sapir et al. 2021), anxiety disorders (Lebowitz et al. 2019), and parents of adults with entitled dependence (Lebowitz et al. 2012;see reviews by Omer 2021;Omer and Lebowitz 2016). ...
... 74 Studies conducted in a western context that promote independent sleep for infants and toddlers tend to focus on the correlation between parental responsiveness and night-waking, 75 implying causation. However, heightened anxiety in infancy was associated with reduced efficacy of graduated extinction methods to improve sleep, 76 suggesting that the parental nighttime presence may be responsive to waking, rather than causing it. ...
... The therapeutic approach here is characterised by an empathic understanding that makes gentle, supportive, patient, and above all persistent contact possible with the patient. Here, we also think of the concept of parental presence (Omer & von Schlippe, 2002) which retains the goals of being similarly patient, appreciative, and persevering. In practice, for the therapist, it will look like a continuation of relationship-building and strengths based work, while gently and repetitively reiterating the wish to provide a different perspective on the problem behavior. ...
... NVR has also been applied in UK Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), with evidence of reduced parental stress, improved family relationships, and reduced problem behaviour (Newman et al., 2014), with foster carers in Belgium with evidence found of significant improvements in child behaviour and parenting stress ( Van-Holen et al., 2016), and in Germany where it was found to be equally effective as Teen Triple P (T-PPP) in improving parental presence and reducing parental helplessness and depression, and more effective than both T-PPP and a waiting list control in improving behaviour (Ollefs et al., 2009). NVR has also been applied to supporting parents of children with anxiety disorders who refuse treatment with evidence of improvements in child anxiety and family accommodation (Lebowitz, 2013;Lebowitz et al., 2014), with parents of dependent adult children with evidence of reduced helplessness and increased independence (Lebowitz et al., 2012), and most recently with parents of young adults with high functioning autism with evidence of reduced parental helplessness and depression (Golan, Shilo, & Omer, 2018). ...