Habacuc Flores-Moreno's research while affiliated with The University of Queensland and other places

Publications (40)

Article
Full-text available
Deadwood is a large global carbon store with its store size partially determined by biotic decay. Microbial wood decay rates are known to respond to changing temperature and precipitation. Termites are also important decomposers in the tropics but are less well studied. An understanding of their climate sensitivities is needed to estimate climate c...
Article
Full-text available
Simulations of the land surface carbon cycle typically compress functional diversity into a small set of plant functional types (PFT), with parameters defined by the average value of measurements of functional traits. In most earth system models, all wild plant life is represented by between five and 14 PFTs and a typical grid cell (≈100 × 100 km)...
Preprint
Animals, such as termites, have largely been overlooked as global-scale drivers of biogeochemical cycles 1,2 , despite site-specific findings 3,4 . Deadwood turnover, an important component of the carbon cycle, is driven by multiple decay agents. Studies have focused on temperate systems 5,6 , where microbes dominate decay ⁷ . Microbial decay is se...
Article
Full-text available
We updated the routines used to estimate leaf maintenance respiration (MR) in the Energy Land Model (ELM) using a comprehensive global respiration data base. The updated algorithm includes a temperature acclimating base rate, an updated instantaneous temperature response, and new plant functional type specific parameters. The updated MR algorithm r...
Article
Full-text available
Termites are important ecosystem engineers in tropical habitats, with different feeding groups able to decompose wood, grass, litter, and soil organic matter. In most tropical regions, termite abundance and species diversity are assumed to increase with rainfall, with highest levels found in rainforests. However, in the Australian tropics, this pat...
Article
Full-text available
Transitioning across biological scales is a central challenge in land surface models. Processes that operate at the scale of individual leaves must be scaled to canopies, and this is done using dedicated submodels. Here, we focus on a submodel that prescribes how light and nitrogen are distributed through plant canopies. We found a mathematical inc...
Article
Full-text available
There is a wealth of research on the way interactions with pollinators shape flower traits. However, we have much more to learn about influences of the abiotic environment on flower colour. We combine quantitative flower colour data for 339 species from a broad spatial range covering tropical, temperate, arid, montane and coastal environments from...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Aim Climate variability threatens to destabilize production in many ecosystems. Asynchronous species dynamics may buffer against such variability when a decrease in performance by some species is offset by an increase in performance of others. However, high climatic variability can eliminate species through stochastic extinctions or cause similar s...
Article
High-throughput sequencing (e.g., amplicon and shotgun) has provided new insight into the diversity and distribution of fungi around the globe, but developing a framework to understand this diversity has proved challenging. Here we review key ecological strategy theories developed for macro-organisms and discuss ways that they can be applied to fun...
Article
Fungi play many essential roles in ecosystems. They facilitate plant access to nutrients and water, serve as decay agents that cycle carbon and nutrients through the soil, water and atmosphere, and are major regulators of macro‐organismal populations. Although technological advances are improving the detection and identification of fungi, there sti...
Article
Plant trait databases often contain traits that are correlated, but for whom direct (undirected statistical dependency) and indirect (mediated by other traits) connections may be confounded. The confounding of correlation and connection hinders our understanding of plant strategies, and how these vary among growth forms and climate zones. We identi...
Article
Full-text available
Fine root decomposition constitutes a critical yet poorly understood flux of carbon and nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we present the first large‐scale synthesis of species trait effects on the early stages of fine root decomposition at both global and local scales. Based on decomposition rates for 279 plant species across 105 studies a...
Article
Full-text available
Leaf traits are frequently measured in ecology to provide a ‘common currency’ for predicting how anthropogenic pressures impact ecosystem function. Here, we test whether leaf traits consistently respond to experimental treatments across 27 globally distributed grassland sites across 4 continents. We find that specific leaf area (leaf area per unit...
Article
Despite the importance of fine‐roots for the acquisition of soil resources like nitrogen and water, the study of linkages between traits and both population and community dynamics remains focused on aboveground traits. We address this gap by investigating associations between belowground traits and metrics of both successional position and species...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Currently, Earth system models (ESMs) represent variation in plant life through the presence of a small set of plant functional types (PFTs), each of which accounts for hundreds or thousands of species across thousands of vegetated grid cells on land. By expanding plant traits from a single mean value per PFT to a full distribution per...
Article
Animal color phenotypes are invariably influenced by both their biotic community and the abiotic environments. A host of hypotheses have been proposed for how variables such as solar radiation, habitat shadiness, primary productivity, temperature, rainfall and community diversity might affect animal color traits. However, while individual factors h...
Article
Ecosystem eutrophication often increases domination by non-natives and causes displacement of native taxa. However, variation in environmental conditions may affect the outcome of interactions between native and non-native taxa in environments where nutrient supply is elevated. We examined the interactive effects of eutrophication, climate variabil...
Article
The idea that species are generally more colourful at tropical latitudes has held great appeal among biologists since the days of exploration by early naturalists. However, advances in colour quantification and analysis only now allow an objective test of this idea. We provide the first quantitative analysis of the latitudinal gradient in colour on...
Article
After years of qualitative and subjective study, quantitative colour science is now enabling rapid measurement, analysis and comparison of colour traits. However, it has not been determined how many replicates one needs to accurately quantify a species' colours for studies aimed at broad cross-species trait comparison. We address this major methodo...
Article
Full-text available
Question Are plant traits more closely correlated with mean annual temperature, or with mean annual precipitation? Location Global. Methods We quantified the strength of the relationships between temperature and precipitation and 21 plant traits from 447,961 species-site combinations worldwide. We used meta-analysis to provide an overall answer t...
Conference Paper
Previous studies have demonstrated that most introduced species go through rapid phenotypic change during their first decades to centuries of being introduced to a new range. However, little is known about the trends these phenotypic changes follow through time. Using herbarium specimens we track changes in the leaf area, leaf shape and plant heigh...
Article
Full-text available
Some introduced populations thrive and evolve despite the presumed loss of diversity at introduction. We aimed to quantify the amount of genetic diversity retained at introduction in species that have shown evidence of adaptation to their introduced environments. Samples were taken from native and introduced ranges of Arctotheca populifolia and Pet...
Data
Comparison of introduced and native species’ recruitment success once the effect of life form (woody/non-woody) has been taken into account. (DOC)
Data
Comparison of introduced and native species’ recruitment success once the effect of continuous longevity has been accounted for. (DOC)
Article
Full-text available
It is commonly accepted that introduced species have recruitment advantages over native species. However, this idea has not been widely tested, and those studies that have compared survival of introduced and native species have produced mixed results. We compiled data from the literature on survival through germination (seed to seedling survival),...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods We aimed to test the widely held idea that introduced species have dispersal and recruitment advantages over native species. We compiled data on mean and maximum dispersal distance for 56 introduced and 367 native species, and data on survival through germination (seed to seedling survival), early seedling survival (su...
Data
Attributes of introduced and native species. (DOC)
Data
Graphs of relationships between dispersal distance of introduced vs. native species when accounting for seed mass, plant height or dispersal syndrome individually. (DOC)
Data
Total number of missing values for trait data. (DOC)
Article
Full-text available
We provide the first global test of the idea that introduced species have greater seed dispersal distances than do native species, using data for 51 introduced and 360 native species from the global literature. Counter to our expectations, there was no significant difference in mean or maximum dispersal distance between introduced and native specie...
Data
Supporting Information S1. Analyses including a random effect for site. (DOC)
Data
Details of analyses of dispersal distance of native vs. introduced species when accounting for seed mass, plant height or dispersal syndrome, individually. (DOC)
Data
Comparisons of introduced and native species’ seed dispersal distances using a subset of data with no missing values. (DOC)
Article
1. We provide a brief overview of progress in our understanding of introduced plant species. 2. Three main conclusions emerge from our review: (i) Many lines of research, including the search for traits that make species good invaders, or that make ecosystems susceptible to invasion, are yielding idiosyncratic results. To move forward, we advocate...

Citations

... The suitable microenvironment in the highly decaying heartwood may be more preferred by fungal mycorrhiza and invertebrates (Harmon et al., 1986;Vogel et al., 2020;Wang et al., 2022b). Their activity accelerates the decomposition of the humified and recalcitrant organic carbon in the heartwood (Seibold, 2021;Zanne et al., 2022), decreasing the humification degree. ...
... Termites are regarded as important ecosystem engineers in tropical habitats due to the significant environmental alterations they promote. Their greatest contribution to ecosystem functionality is through decomposition promoted by different feeding groups that consume wood, grass, litter, and soil organic matter [1]. Those insects contribute to the release of immobilized N, P, and carbon dioxide [2,3], as well as the increased capacity for cation exchange and leaching reversal [4,5]. ...
... The role and potential significance of the outer bark in atmosphere-water-vegetation interactions is often examined qualitatively or overlooked in field and modeling studies (Butler et al., 2020;Pace and Grote, 2020). In many fields, leaves still rule. ...
... Flowers use color to communicate with different organisms such as pollinators and herbivores (Lev-Yadun & Gould 2007;Schiestl & Johnson 2013). Pigments used to produce flower color may also function as stress mediators in response to environmental factors (Dalrymple et al. 2020). Coloration will, then, be selected by several biotic and abiotic pressures throughout the evolutionary history of a plant. ...
... Alternatively, temporal and spatial synchrony have been widely studied to examine the correlated fluctuations of population dynamics over time and across geographically distant locations [24][25][26][27][28] , which can play a significant role in ecosystem stability 13,29,30 . From the perspective of ecological resistance, asynchrony of species' responses to perturbations describes the niche differentiation of environmental tolerance (i.e., how different species respond differently to variations in their environment) 31 . ...
... Finally, we observed a large proportion of fungal taxa unclassified at the guild level, indicating that a substantial effort is still required to obtain a comprehensive overview of the fungal ecological communities inhabiting drylands worldwide, and validate their relationship with environmental change. Our work opens a new line of investigation to include quantifying the importance of ecological processes that govern fungal communities across contrasting regions of the world, with particular emphasis on identifying the traits, and trait trade-offs, underpinning their dispersal and functional capabilities in such unique ecosystems (Zanne et al., 2020). We anticipate that, as strain-specific trait data become available and ecological guild assignments more comprehensive, better assessment of functional variation expressed within and among communities in relation to dispersal constraints, UV tolerance and climate variability could be performed. ...
... FUNGuild, the most widely used fungal functional database, has 9476 entries with a 66% genus-level identification range and a 34% species-level identification range [43]. Põlme et al. recently developed the FungalTraits tool that was used to re-annotate 10,210 fungal genera and 151 Stramenopila genera associated with 17 lifestyles [37] based on the previous fungal functional annotation tools FUNGuild and Fun Fun [76]. To reveal the functional characteristics of the fungal community in the microhabitat of C. sieboldii, we downloaded the python package from GitHub (https:// github. ...
... High modularity can indicate relatively strong functional decoupling among traits. Low modularity means relatively high functional coupling, that is, relatively robust associations among functional traits are present (Flores-Moreno et al., 2019;Rao et al., 2022). This statistical analysis was carried out using R 4.0.5 (https://www.r-project.org/). ...
... Leaf and root litter quality do not necessarily follow the same patterns within mycorrhizal types (Taylor et al. 2016, Sun et al. 2018) but do generally covary within a species (Freschet et al. 2012), which might make plant identity a better predictor of soil properties than mycorrhizal type. Notably, one meta-analysis that found mycorrhizal type was a significant predictor of root decay with EcM roots decaying more slowly than AM roots had a preponderance of data points from the EcM orders Fagales and Pinales (See et al. 2019). The low-quality root litter of Pinaceae and Fagaceae could have contributed to the relationship between soil properties and the basal area of Pinaceae and Fagaceae (PC2) much like the low-quality leaf litter discussed above. ...
... However, there is enhanced evaporation in the subtropic area due to the recently weakened summer monsoon and rapid warming (Cai et al., 2018). Low relative humidity and soil moisture availability due to high evapotranspiration possibly lead to the limitation of root development, water, nutrient uptake, cambial activity, foliage efficiency, and tree growth (Firn et al., 2019). Furthermore, the mean elevation and the total annual precipitation of our study area are relatively lower than other studies , which further aggravates the importance of moisture. ...