Gwendolyn Murphy's research while affiliated with Duke University and other places

Publications (3)

Article
Duke Medicine utilized interprofessional case conferences (ICCs) from 2008 to 2012 with the objective of modeling and facilitating development of teamwork skills among diverse health profession students, including physical therapy, physician assistant, medical doctor and nursing. The purpose of this publication was to describe the operational proce...
Article
Self-reported health data are used by health insurance companies to assess risk. Most studies show underreporting compared with clinical measurements. To compare self-reported height, weight, blood pressure, waist circumference, and dietary intake with registered dietitian's (RD's) measures of the same parameters. This is a secondary analysis of da...
Article
The Duke Medicine Graduate Medical Education Quasi-Endowment, established in 2006, provides infrastructure support and encourages educational innovation. The authors describe Duke's experience with the "grassroots innovation" part of the fund, the Duke Innovation Fund, and discuss the Innovation Fund's processes for application, review, and impleme...

Citations

... Where this sits within the literature Research from Australia, Hong Kong, Finland, Malaysia, Sweden and the USA has found similar, substantial agreement for self-reported and researcher/clinician-measured weight and height for populations of all ages. [18][19][20][21][22][23] Similar to our findings, in other studies which compared both self-reported and researcher-measured BP and BMI, agreement was stronger between BMI measures than between BP measurements. 21 24 Studies comparing selfreported and researcher/clinician-measured BP have found varying levels of agreement, with higher agreement often found older populations. ...
... 11 The Duke Graduate Medical Education Quasi-Endowment fund boasts impressive innovations that have resulted in enduring instructional strategies, but have been less successful in dissemination of findings. 12 Another US study examining a small collaborative research grant program compared funded versus unfunded projects and concluded that funded projects had increased collaboration, and a higher output of scholarly projects including papers, posters and presentations. 13 Other studies have described similar findings. ...