Gregory J. Wilson's research while affiliated with University of New England (Australia) and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Full-text available
Sixteen experienced male powerlifters served as subjects in a training study designed to examine the effect of flexibility training on: (i) the stiffness of the series elastic components (SEC) of the upper body musculature and (ii) rebound and purely concentric bench press performance. Nine of the subjects participated in two sessions of flexibilit...
Article
Full-text available
Twelve experienced male weight lifters of varying ability completed a series of bench press lifts at 95% of maximum. These lifts included a rebound bench press, which was performed without a delay between the downward and upward components of the lift, a bench press performed without a downward phase, and two bench press movements performed with va...
Article
Full-text available
The bar movement characteristics of 10 elite powerlifters were analyzed while bench pressing a maximum load and a submaximal load in a simulated competition using high-speed cinematography. Significant differences in bar path and alterations to the general force profile of movement were evident as the load was increased. These movement discrepancie...
Article
Full-text available
The performance of ten elite powerlifters were analyzed in a simulated competition environment using three-dimensional cinematography and surface electromyography while bench pressing approximately 80% of maximum, a maximal load, and an unsuccessful supramaximal attempt. The resultant moment arm (from the sagittal and transverse planes) of the weig...

Citations

... On the other hand, Lander et al., [29] found that the point of failure in the bench press exercise occurs during the concentric phase and that the range of movement where it occurs does not vary much regardless of the intensity (75 or 90% of 1 RM). Moreover, Wilson et al., [30] confirmed that the concentric phase of the bench press is especially difficult due to mechanical disadvantage. Altogether, these studies, seem to indicate that training with full ROM may impair extremely high neuromuscular recruitment, which is usually warranted in powerlifting. ...
... Additionally, Mann and Jones (1999) related long-term DS with enhanced balance, kinesthetic, proprioception, and pre-activation abilities, all of vital importance for any sports activity. Moreover, long-term DS seems to decrease the energy cost of exercise (Weber and Kraus, 1949), while encouraging the reuse of the elastic strain energy (Wilson et al., 1992). According to Shellock and Prentice (1985), DS elevates muscle temperature by inducing rapid, dynamic, and explosive muscle contractions during the jumps. ...
... However, several studies have shown that the eccentric phase influences the concentric when it comes to execution. This phenomenon is known as the countermovement cycle [2][3][4]. Wilson, Elliott and Wood [3] found that the participants achieved a 14% increase in strength with a countermovement bench press compared to a pure concentric bench press. ...
... The traditional bench press technique adopted during power training is characterized by a large acceleration at the beginning of the barbell lift (ascent phase) (Newton et al., 1997;Baker and Newton, 2005;Tillaar and Ettema, 2013). However, high force generation, which produces barbell acceleration, is only observed during a small part of the ascent phase and is followed by a deceleration phase at the end of the barbell lift (Elliott et al., 1989; van den Tillaar and Ettema, 2009;van den Tillaar and Ettema, 2010;Pérez-Castilla et al., 2020). Furthermore, the deceleration phase is accompanied by a reduction in agonist muscle activity (Elliott et al., 1989;Newton et al., 1996;Sakamoto and Sinclair, 2012), which suggests that the traditional barbell technique may not provide the best approach to train maximal neuromuscular adaptions. ...