Greg Kline's research while affiliated with University of Massachusetts Amherst and other places

Publications (11)

Article
To study the effects of a 12-week weight loss strategy involving increased physical activity, self-selected hypocaloric diet, and group support on psychological well-being, quality of life, and health practices in moderately obese women. Eighty women aged 20-49 years weighing between 20-50% above 1983 Metropolitan Life Insurance Tables were randoml...
Article
The purpose of this study was to compare the physical activity levels of physical therapists using five activity questionnaires and one electronic motion sensor (Caltrac). Thirty-three physical therapists (26 female, seven male) were monitored for seven consecutive days. The Caltrac data were compared with five questionnaires, including the Baecke...
Article
The purpose of the current investigation was to evaluate the validity of an automated, noninvasive CO2 rebreathing cardiac output technique using Direct Fick and thermodilution methods as the criterion procedures. Nineteen adults ([Latin capital letter X with macron above] +/- SD age = 58.6 +/- 11.6 yrs) undergoing diagnostic right heart catheteriz...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this investigation was to explore an alternative field test to estimate maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) using a one-mile walk test. VO2max was determined in 343 healthy adult (males = 165, females = 178) subjects 30 to 69 yr using a treadmill protocol (mean +/- SD: VO2max = 37.0 +/- 10.7 ml X kg-1 X min-1). Each subject performed...
Article
The purpose of this investigation was to explore an alternative field test to estimate maximal oxygen consumption ([latin capital V with dot above]O2max) using a one-mile walk test. [latin capital V with dot above]O2max was determined in 343 healthy adult (males = 165, females = 178) subjects 30 to 69 yr using a treadmill protocol (mean +/- SD: [la...
Article
The purpose of this investigation was to explore an alternative field test to estimate maximal oxygen consumption ([latin capital V with dot above]O2max) using a one-mile walk test. [latin capital V with dot above]O2max was determined in 343 healthy adult (males = 165, females = 178) subjects 30 to 69 yr using a treadmill protocol (mean +/- SD: [la...
Article
In brief: Two related studies were conducted to determine whether fast walking is intense enough to elicit a training heart rate (THR), which is defined as ≥ 70% of maximal heart rate. In one study, 343 subjects (165 men, 178 women) walked a mile as fast as possible. Ninety-one percent of all the women and 83% of men aged 50 and older reached a THR...

Citations

... Extracted data included: (1) study setting (country, test location/surface); (2) participant characteristics (sex, age, height, body mass, and body mass index [BMI]); (3) method of measuring walking speed (test protocol); (4) walking pace category (description of pace provided in the original text); (5) walking speed (in originally reported units); (6) cadence, and (7) intensity (where and as reported). Study authors were contacted when specific data were missing or unclear [16][17][18][19]. The online software WebPlotDigitizer version 4.1 (https ://autom eris.io/ ...
... Eighty healthy middle-aged adults were recruited at sports and leisure facilities located in Madrid (Spain). Before the experimental session, the physical condition of the participants was assessed with the Rockport fitness walking test [52], which is an indirect measure of the maximum amount of oxygen that one can utilize during high-intensity exercise (VO 2 max). The test consists of walking as fast as possible for one mile (1609 m) on a flat ground using a heart rate monitor. ...
... Godzhello, A. G. et al. found that cardiorespiratory endurance represents the body's ability to continue the physical activity, it reflects the cardiopulmonary function of the human body under a certain exercise intensity, and it is considered to be one of the most important indicators in the healthy physical fitness evaluation index system [4]. Gurry, M. K. and others found that modern medical research proved that if the level of cardiorespiratory endurance is low, the risk of suffering from cardiovascular diseases is significantly increased [5]; Lee, C. B. and others proposed to improve the level of cardiorespiratory endurance; it can not only improve the adaptability of the heart and lungs, strengthen physical fitness, and improve exercise efficiency but it can also reduce the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, metabolic diseases, and other diseases caused by poor lifestyles and improve people's quality of life [6]. Mikami, Y. et al. found that due to an increase in a static lifestyle and a decrease in physical activity, the cardiorespiratory endurance of people of all ages in China is showing a downward trend [7]. ...
... whereby exposure to maximal or exhaustive activities was thought to be ill-advisable because of the health risk it posed to patients [13,14]. Over the years, a number of walking [15][16][17][18][19], cycling [14,[20][21][22], and running [23][24][25] SMFT have been administered among clinical and healthy populations. These tests involve single or multiple continuous steady-state protocols, with some prescribing an absolute standardized intensity, while others include relative intensity ranges, or self-paced protocols (refer to File 1 in the Electronic Supplementary Material [ESM]). ...
... As utilized in prior studies [18,63], the translated instrument was translated from English into Spanish by a Spanish-fluent TSSC project member, then the Spanish form was back-translated by a different TSSC project member, and finally the back-translated form was compared to the original English survey to make revisions to ensure linguistic accuracy. This instrument has been in use before with the local population [13,18] with high test-retest reliability (r = 0.75, p < 0.05) and moderate agreement when compared to an accelerometer (k = 0.42, p < 0.05) [64], with fair agreement seen in Spanish-speaking patients (k = 0.20, p < 0.05) when compared to an objective pedometer measure for classifying participants as "physically active" in meeting PA guidelines or not [65]. Weekly frequency of moderate or strenuous PA was multiplied by the minutes spent on each moderate or strenuous activity to calculate each participant's weekly metabolic equivalent adjusted minutes (METminutes). ...
... In a healthy population, exercise is an effective means of promoting, improving and managing mental health [18]. This is also the case for populations with chronic conditions [19] and in overweight women [20]. The specific interaction between exercise and mental health in PCOS has not been explored in depth, but the limited existing research indicates a positive effect of exercise for improving mental health and health-related quality of life in women with PCOS [21][22][23][24]. ...