Graham Wood's scientific contributions

Publications (5)

Technical Report
Full-text available
A number of alternative intersection layouts are used around the country to reduce traffic delays and to improve road safety. One such group of alternative intersections are termed ‘priority controlled seagull intersections’. Seagull intersections are often used on roads to reduce traffic delays as they allow right-turning traffic from the side roa...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Accident occurrence is typically low at rural priority controlled intersections, due to low traffic volumes, compared with priority controlled urban intersections. Unlike many urban intersections, the low accident occurrence makes it difficult, from the accident history alone, to identify accident trends and justify improvement projects. This resea...
Article
Cycling is a sustainable mode of travel and is an alternative to private motor vehicles in urban areas, particularly for trips of less than 6 km. Although there are a number of benefits of promoting more cycling, including health benefits to cyclists, reduced emissions, reduced parking demand and less traffic congestion, the risk of having a crash...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The management of speed is considered an important safety issue at roundabouts. The approach speed and negotiating speed through roundabouts depends on both the geometric design of the roundabout and sight distance. In New Zealand and in the Australian States the design standards (based on Austroads) recommend long approach sight distance and provi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper discusses the impact of roadside hazards on the occurrence and severity of rural single vehicle accidents and the important causal variables. The accident prediction models developed so far indicate that the location and type of roadside hazards, the consistency of the horizontal alignment and seal width are important predictor variables...

Citations

... Using the smaller sample set of 17 high-speed roundabouts (with speed limits on at least two approaches greater than 70 km/hr) the influence of high speed limits was investigated by Turner et al. (2006b). As this data consisted only of the approach volume and number of crashes, no non-flow variables could be examined for this dataset other than speed limit. ...
... The most recent studies in New Zealand were undertaken by Cenek et. al. (2004), which focused on road alignment and skid resistance, and Turner (2004), which focused on roadside hazards. Research, funded by Land Transport NZ and MoT, is currently underway on the next generation of rural road accident prediction models. ...
... Roundabouts, as substitute intersections, are likely to exhibit a similar traffic volume influence on their anticipated safety performance. Many studies have been undertaken to predict accident models depending on geometric and traffic variables using count data (Poisson or negative binomial models) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20). However, these studies assumed that variables (geometric and traffic) are constant across the observations (roundabouts). ...
... Based on longitudinal collision data for the study area, they assumed a linear relationship between cycling trips and cycling collisions up to a threshold modal share of 2.5% after which a 'Safety in Numbers' effect of half that recommended by Jacobsen (2003) was applied. A power transformation based on Turner, Hughes, Allatt, Wood, and Luo (2010) accounted for the nonlinear impact of the number of light vehicles. ...