Gitta Hasing's research while affiliated with Florida Gulf Coast University and other places

Publications (17)

Article
Trees are often deeply planted as a result of nursery and landscape practices. While past research has investigated the impact of deep planting on tree growth and survival, its impact on whole-tree stability is not well documented. Green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica 'Patmore') trees were planted at three different depths in research plots and establ...
Article
Organic mulch is commonly used in landscape planting beds to improve plant growth and reduce competition from weed species. Although many different mulch materials have been evaluated in landscape, forestry, or agricultural settings, there have been no previous reports concerning the maintenance costs associated with different mulch materials from...
Article
Several Florida cities and counties ban fertilization during the summer rainy season (fertilizer blackout). Little research is available to support or contradict the underlying justifications for these policies. We used large-volume lysimeters to address the impacts of several fertilization regimes on plant growth and aesthetics of sweet viburnum (...
Article
Full-text available
Wood decay is a factor considered in all commonly-accepted tree risk assessment methods; however, few studies have attempted to assess its presence in the urban forest or its predictability given visual cues and site factors. A random sampling of trees situated on hurricane evacuation routes was inventoried and assessed for risk in the city of Tamp...
Article
Use of preemergence and postemergence herbicides is the most effective and economical method of weed control in landscape planting beds. When used correctly, herbicides can provide satisfactory weed control, reduce labor costs, and cause little or no negative environmental impacts. Major factors in herbicide efficacy include choosing the correct he...
Article
Full-text available
Weed control continues to be one of the most expensive and time consuming aspects of landscape maintenance. Many homeowners are becoming more interested in nonchemical pest-management strategies due to increasing concern over the environmental impact of pesticide use. Nonchemical landscape weed control can be achieved using mechanical disruption (e...
Article
Previous research indicated that acceptable quality annual and perennial plant species can be grown in the landscape with low nitrogen (N) inputs. However, information on the impact of soil conditions and N use by ornamental plants grown in central Florida is lacking in the literature. Our objective was to evaluate plant growth and quality response...
Article
Urban trees provide shade and beauty, and the urban forest as a whole provides a wealth of benefits to neighborhoods and residents. But stresses from the urban environment may lead to problems that pose an unacceptable safety risk to people and property. It is a landowner’s responsibility to ensure that the trees on their property are safe. A key s...
Article
Resistance recording drills are specialized pieces of decay detection equipment that may be used as part of an advanced risk assessment. While not required for tree risk assessment work, resistance recording drills have been shown to be effective in helping arborists detect and document internal tree decay in trees. This 5-page fact sheet was writt...
Article
Research supporting recommendations for fertilizer needs of landscape-grown vines and groundcovers is lacking. The objectives of our study were to (1) evaluate the quality response of selected vine and groundcover species to nitrogen (N) fertilization at five rates and (2) validate the recommended N fertilizer rates (from the initial evaluation) by...
Article
Recent research suggested that the nitrogen (N) fertilizer rates needed to maintain high-quality landscape plants was lower than rates needed to grow the largest size plants. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of N fertilizer rate on the aesthetic quality of various landscape-grown annual and perennials species. Nineteen cool-season annuals,...
Article
Urban landscapes in Florida are typically dominated by turfgrass monoculture, with ornamental landscape plants comprising only a small portion of the landscape. Incorporating more woody ornamentals into your landscape can reduce fertilization and irrigation demand and help reduce nutrient leaching losses from your yard—a combination that will help...
Article
All trees pose some level of risk to nearby people, structures, and utilities. As trees age or become weakened by pests, disease, and/or other stresses, a tree owner or manager may need to decide what risk level he or she is willing to accept and what modifications may be needed. Experienced arborists can aid in this decision process by conducting...
Article
Plumeria are flowering ornamentals native to the Caribbean, Mexico, Central America, Venezuela, and Colombia. Highly valued for their colorful flowers, plumeria are now grown in tropical and subtropical areas throughout the world. Plumeria, or frangipani, are members of the Apocynaceae family. Unless steps are taken to prevent frost damage, plumeri...
Article
Despite inconsistent reports of nitrogen (N) fertilization response on growth of landscape-grown woody ornamentals, broad N fertilization recommendations exist in the literature. The objective of this research was to evaluate the growth and quality response of three landscape-grown woody shrub species to N fertilizer. Three ornamental shrub species...

Citations

... Lysimeters are often used to quantify the movement of water, nutrients, or pollutants from the surface or root zone into groundwater below (McLean et al. 2018;Prasad and Hochmuth 2016). Drainage lysimeters are typically used to determine the quantity or quality of leachate that leaves the vadose or root zone. ...
... + 1.696 × vigor + 1.696 × trunk + 1.696 × tilt, where Y leads to a prediction of tree failure (Y > 0) or survival (Y < 0), is used, and it was pointed out that the tree strength was judged by leaf color and degree of cover. The ISA Tree Hazard Evaluation Method, which combines failure potential, size of possible failure site, and target rating, with the three scored on a scale of values 1 to 4 and the sum of the three reflecting the overall hazard rating, has been extensively applied and modified by municipalities and commercial arborists [11,13]. However, because only the sum of the three ways to determine risk grade cannot fully reflect the risk of trees, for example in the own existence of very big security hidden dangers but no measures of trees as target level of risk, it is concluded that the tree are at high risk, but in fact, since there is no risk of target, the tree does not cause the risk [19]. ...
... When planting trees, there are many considerations beyond the debate with removing packing materials. Planting depth is perhaps of greater concern (Miesbauer et al. 2019). Tree planting with the RSTZ below the soil surface may result in tree roots growing toward the soil surface and resuming lateral growth at a direction away from or towards the tree stem. ...
... have focused on the effects of mulch in container plant production, but depths of %2 inches or less have been shown to either increase plant growth or have no effect (Amoroso et al., 2010;Billeaud and Zajicek, 1989). Mulch applied at an adequate depth, typically 1 inch or greater, has been shown to provide greater weed control compared with one herbicide application, as evidenced by previous reports (Bartley et al., 2017;Marble et al., 2017;Saha et al., 2019); however, use of mulch for weed control has not been widely adopted in the nursery industry. The primary barrier to adoption is cost and ease of application. ...
... Related studies on tree-wind interactions have been carried out in many places over the world, such as Asia (Hong Kong [13], Macau [14], and Mainland China [15]), the United States [16][17][18], Canada [19][20][21], the United Kingdom [22,23], Europe (Portugal [24], Czech Republic [25], and Germany [26]), and Australia [27]. Meanwhile, the field measurements were conducted on many tree species, and the sample tree species can be categorized into deciduous broadleaf trees (Lime trees (Tilia × europaea) [28], Oak trees (Quercus) [16,25,29,30], Maple trees (Acer spp.) [26], Hickory trees (Carya spp.) [31] and Pear trees (Pyrus spp.) [32]) and conifers trees (Pine (Pinus spp.) [18,30,33], Spruce (Picea spp.) [20,34,35], Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) [36] and Ironwood (Casuarina equisetifolia) [37]). ...
... Information for humid, high-rainfall climates is particularly limited, even more so for monsoonal, subtropical climates that have both dry and high-rainfall seasons. Furthermore, extant studies have focused largely on trees in temperate-arid to semi-arid climates [2] rather than on shrubs [3][4][5][6][7][8]. Finally, these water-use studies are rarely paired with an investigation into the amount of root-zone water that can be safely depleted before irrigation is required, an important piece of irrigation information in any climate that determines how much a plant can safely mine root-zone water without stress. ...
... Weeds compete with crops for light, food, water, nutrients, or space in agricultural fields, and they also discharge allelopathic chemicals into the soil, reducing crop productivity and quality [169]. According to agronomic research, light can only reach the soil for a few cm, so mulching at a depth of 5 cm is the most often advised method for reducing weed development [182]. The microclimatic conditions of the soil surface are changed by the use of any form of mulch, which in turn influences the weed spectrum. ...
... Sometimes it is necessary to climb up the tree to inspect the hidden parts from different angles. Despite requiring an abundance of manpower and resources to cover all urban trees (more than 1,700,000 trees) in the whole territory of Hong Kong [16], tree inspection involves understanding the perceived risk of each urban tree [31] to ensure early preservation of trees, which can help minimize risk exposure for city dwellers [32,33]. ...
... Notably, the correct use of herbicides can offer satisfactory weed control and cause little or no negative impact on the environment. Important factors of herbicide efficiency involve the selection of the correct herbicide for the weed population, following appropriate calibration procedures, and the use of herbicides at the correct time [54]. ...
... In Florida, turfgrass maintenance, most notably fertilization practices, have become an increasingly controversial issue, leading to blackout dates and implementation of numerous fertilization ordinances (Ryan et al. 2019). These concerns, as well as an increasing awareness of water scarcity and/or conservation efforts, have led many homeowners to opt for non-turf groundcovers because of the reduced need for irrigation and fertilization (Hayden et al. 2015, Pittenger et al. 2001, Shober et al. 2014. ...