Gina M. Morss's research while affiliated with Arizona State University and other places

Publications (23)

Article
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Background. The Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), which includes walking, balance, and chair stands tests, independently predicts mobility disability and activities of daily living disability. To date, however, there is no definitive evidence from randomized controlled trials that SPPB scores can be improved. Our objective was to assess th...
Article
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We examined 14 d of oral adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) supplementation on indices of anaerobic capacity and muscular strength. Twenty-seven healthy males successfully completed the trial, after randomly receiving in a double-blind manner an oral dose of low dose (150 mg) or high dose (225 mg) ATP, or matched placebo. To improve absorption charact...
Article
Regular exercise is associated with increased heart rate variability (HRV). However, results from studies examining the effect of exercise training on HRV in postmenopausal women are inconclusive. In addition, the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on HRV remains a subject of speculation. We examined 88 sedentary postmenopausal women in a...
Article
We examined the effects of a commercially marketed herbal-based formula purported to increase endurance on oxygen consumption (VO2) in 17 competitive category III/IV amateur cyclists [mean (SEM) age: 31.1 (1.8) yr; height: 178.5 (1.8) cm; weight: 77.1 (1.6) kg]. Each cyclist participated in two (pre/post) cycling tests progressing 25 W.4 min(-1) st...
Article
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Physical inactivity in postmenopausal women contributes to a rise in atherogenic risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome. Although regular physical activity positively contributes to health, inactivity progressively increases with age. The Dose Response to Exercise in Women aged 45-75 yr (DREW) study is designed to investigate the effec...
Article
This study compared the physiological responses (oxygen consumption and energy expenditure) of Nordic Walking to regular walking under field-testing conditions. Eleven women (M age = 27.1 years, SD = 6.4) and 11 men (M age = 33.8 years, SD = 9.0) walked 1,600 m with and without walking poles on a level, 200-m track. For women, Nordic Walking result...

Citations

... Exercise is a subset of physical activity, being planned, structured and repetitive [150], and its benefits have been extensively studied. Exercise improves different parameters in older adults, such as strength [153,154] and physical function [154,155], and reduces disability [28,30], as well as preventing falls and fall-associated injuries [156], demonstrating that lengthy interventions are safe [157]. Even in older adults who meet the sarcopenia criteria, physical exercise significantly improves strength (assessed by grip strength, knee extension and chair test), physical functioning (timed up and go test and gait speed) and muscle mass [158]. ...
... Compared to regular walking, Nordic Walking involves the human muscular system much more, especially the upper body [6]. The effect is an increased response of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems with less fatigue [7,8]. A prerequisite for good rehabilitation results is the correct use of walking poles. ...
... Nordic Walking (NW), which is understood to mean walking with specially designed walking poles, has been gaining in popularity in recent years and has now become a very attractive form of both recreation and rehabilitation. The publications on NW movement usually concern energy expenditure and metabolic cost [10], [12], [14], [15] and changes in body fat, body composition and metabolic rate [8], [9]. The Internet websites often contain unverified reports which claim that NW contributes to increased energy consumption (by over 40%), higher efficiency and higher heart rate compared to ordinary walking [11], and even that NW reduces the load to lower limbs [13]. ...
... In this sense, despite the fact that GRF are greater in the NW in comparison with W, NW may continue being considered as a healthy alternative given that: a) allows to reach higher speeds, with similar metabolic cost to running achieved with no great increases in joint load [5]. The fast speed in this study was close to the speed of transition from walking to running [23], but without reaching the high GRF experienced on running, what might be appropriate for the prevention of diseases such as osteoporosis [6]; b) implies a higher metabolic cost (23-33 %) with a lower perception of effort [5,24]; c) according to running, NW allows to have a reduction in joint load of between 30 % and 40 % [5,18]; and d) despite the GRF increase showed in the present study, NW allows a reduction (37-50 %) in plantar pressure [13] and vertical GRF during the takeoff. ...
... Increases in O2 deficit and lactate also contributed to caffeine-induced improvements in endurance performance [62]. Similarly, studies on RHO have shown that RHO can significantly improve a number of metrics such as peak VO2, time to exhaustion, peak power output and peak heart rate, all of which support our findings to some extent, and we hope to investigate these metrics more in future studies [63]. ...
... The mechanisms responsible for changes generated by FT are still unknown; however, the literature assumes that they may be partly related to the improvement of vascular endothelial function, resulting in an increased production of nitric oxide (NO), which is associated with stimulation and a lower concentration of renin after a physical training session, thereby inducing a lower amount of angiotensin II, which has an inhibitory effect on the cardiac vagal component [28]. However, the decrease in HRV parameters in the time domain caused by aerobic exercise using a step [21] had a discrepancy when compared to other studies carried out in postmenopausal women [29,30]. This finding can be explained by the monitoring period used, noting that the total variance of HRV increased with the duration of the recording [31]. ...
... Numerous tests including the WAnT (Taheri and Arabameri, 2012;Chromiak et al., 2004;Jordan et al., 2004), vertical jump test, standing long jump test, and Bosco continuous jumps (Taheri and Arabameri, 2012;Sands et al., 2004) have been used to evaluate an athlete's anaerobic capacity, peak power (a measure of muscular strength and speed) or both. Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) (Taheri and Arabameri, 2012;Chromiak et al, 2004;Jordan et al., 2004) has been used to measure an anaerobic activity defined as energy expenditure that uses anaerobic metabolism (without the use of oxygen) by utilizing an exhaustive effort that lasts less than 90 seconds (Wilmore and Costill, 2004). ...
... For example, compared with premenopausal women, postmenopausal women have increased arterial stiffness, and a daily lack of physical exercise places them at increased risk of CVD (3,6). In the US, approximately 40% of adult women (25 million) are postmenopausal, so finding effective methods to reduce CVD risk in this population is of significance in terms of both lowering the healthcare burden and improving national health (7). ...