Gilla Sunnenberg's research while affiliated with University of East Anglia and other places

Publications (8)

Data
High-resolution water quality data recorded at the outlet of the Blackwater Drain, Norfolk, between 2011 and 2019 by an in-situ automated bankside monitoring station.
Conference Paper
This paper describes a study on the Salle Farms estate in Norfolk to assess the effectiveness of a cover crop (oilseed radish) and reduced tillage methods as mitigation measures for controlling diffuse pollution from agriculture. Results from porous pot sampling of nitrate in soil water indicate a substantial contrast between the fields with and wi...
Article
Full-text available
We present the first assessment of the impact of land use change (LUC) to second generation (2G) bioenergy crops on ecosystem services (ES) resolved spatially for Great Britain (GB). A systematic approach was used to assess available evidence on the impacts of LUC from arable, semi-improved grassland or woodland/forest, to 2G bioenergy crops, for w...
Article
The paper presents a model system, which consists of a partial equilibrium model and process-based terrestrial biogeochemistry models, to determine the optimal distributions of both Miscanthus (Miscanthus×giganteus) and short rotation coppice willow (SRC) (Salix. viminalis L. x S. viminalis var Joruun) in Great Britain (GB), as well as their potent...
Article
Full-text available
There has been a concerted effort by the international scientific community to understand the multiple causes and patterns of land-cover change to support sustainable land management. Here, we examined biophysical suitability, and a novel integrated index of “Economic Pressure on Land” (EPL) to explain land cover in the year 2000, and estimated the...
Article
The Water4All project funded, by the EU InterregIIIB programme aimed to demonstrate groundwater protection in the context of spatial planning and the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive. Through a series of workshops, the four partner countries (Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK) developed a handbook containing an approach...
Article
The production rates of a range of low molecular weight halogenated organics have been determined in cultures of five temperate species of macroalgae collected from the north coast of Norfolk, England. Compounds studied included CH3Br, the chlorinated organics CH3Cl, CH2Cl2 and CHCl3, and the iodinated organics CH3I, C2H5I, and CH2ClI. Measurements...
Article
The CAP's evolving Rural Development Plans may offer packages of agri-environmental measures across whole landscapes. Virtual reality modelling can help farmers visualise how whole landscapes may look and more readily appreciate their role in the creation of an integrated totality.

Citations

... Environmentally Sensitive Areas) by contiguous groups of farms (e.g. MacFarlane, Stagg, Turner, & Lievesley, 2004;O'Riordan, Lovett, Dolman, Cobb, & S€ unnenberg, 2000). Exploring ways in which representations of the abundance and distribution of organisms such as farmland birds could be incorporated into such virtual landscapes would be a natural step forward. ...
... (Lovett et al. 2015) indicated a 15% increase in the canopy size for an autumn sown brassica cover crop from the application of 30kg/ha N starter fertiliser, but also noted that this had no associated impact on root growth (a small numerical decrease in root growth of around 5% was noted). Wider UK farm based cover crop research by compared 20-40 kg/ha N starter fertiliser over a range of 15 cover crop approaches (single species and mixtures) across two sites; while some variation between site and cover crop approach was apparent, mean data again suggest a c. 15% increase in cover crop biomass with starter fertiliser application and an associated mean doubling of autumn weed populations (this was potentially associated with the increased site fertility). ...
... Brotons et al., 2004, Jerrentrup et al., 2017, Moreira et al., 2012, Santana et al., 2017, following similar approaches adopted in other studies linking LULC change to biodiversity and ecosystem services levels (e.g. Liang & Liu, 2017, Milner, 2016. Basically, the scoring system considered that potential habitat conditions for open farmland birds will decrease from more valuable rainfed crops, pastures and agrosilvo-pastoral systems, to lower value irrigated crops (including olive groves) and vineyards, and then to Forest/Shrubland (e.g. ...
... The future decentralization of the energy industry, anticipated by National Grid House (FES, 2018), represents a unique opportunity for encouraging the establishment of new domestic bioenergy supply chains, and the roll out of biomass CHP in the United Kingdom. Since generation from biomass is a thermal process, discharging high levels of heat stored in biomass, cogeneration of electricity and heat from biomass-only CHP is likely to be more efficient than electric-only power plants ( Wang et al., 2014). Efficient CHP plants, however, tend to cost more than their less efficient counterparts, and given that the less efficient bioenergy stations consume more biomass, producing and sequestering more CO 2 from CCS, they may receive a larger revenue from providing this climate mitigation service ). ...
... Forest management is not neutral in terms of water quality, but many factors tend to attenuate harmful effects, particularly the fact that human interventions are less frequent in this sector than in agriculture (Fiquepron et al. 2013). There have been examples of land-use change from agriculture to forestry to promote better water quality (Hunsaker and Levine 1995;Hiscock et al. 2007). ...
... Environmental economic approaches have since been applied to define the relative value of ecosystem services [144][145][146], and more recently, the monetization of ecosystem services has emerged as a useful tool to support payments linked to ecosystem conservation [147,148]. A well-established global exemplar of payments for ecosystem services is the REDD+ scheme that, under an incentive-based mechanism, facilitates payments for afforestation and forestry management [149][150][151][152]. ...
... CH 2 Br 2 , CH 2 BrI and CH 2 I 2 as the dominant halocarbon released were also reported from tropical seaweeds (Table 1; Leedham et al. 2013). Baker et al. (2001) investigated the emission of CH 3 Br, CH 3 Cl, CH 3 ClI and C 2 H 5 I by temperate seaweeds and found that the emission rates were relatively low at between magnitude of 10 −4 to 10 1 pmol g −1 DW −1 h −1 . ...