Geof Rayner's research while affiliated with City, University of London and other places

Publications (30)

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The paper reviews the state of policy on antimicrobial use and the growth of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). AMR was anticipated at the time of the first use of antibiotics by their originators. For decades, reports and scientific papers have expressed concern about AMR at global and national policy levels, yet the problem, first exposed a half-cen...
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The paper considers the long-term trajectory of public health and whether a 'Golden Era' in Public Health might be coming to an end. While successful elements of the 20th century policy approach need still to be applied in the developing world, two significant flaws are now apparent within its core thinking. It assumes that continuing economic grow...
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Tony McMichael, our main author with Colin Butler on climate, food systems and human health, and an architect of the New Nutrition, died in September. Some of his contributions can be accessed above. Below are appreciations from Colin Butler, Mark Wahlqvist, Jane Dixon and Colin Sindall, Ro MacFarlane, Elihu Richter, Jonathan Patz, Chris Kelman, Ge...
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This is the 30th issue of World Nutrition, which since its launch in May 2010 has published over 1,500 pages – averaging just over 50 pages an issue. This modest pagination includes a cover and initial pages, an editorial, one or two commentaries, sometimes short communications, and also correspondence. WN normally does not include results of origi...
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It seems to be the fate of public health as concept, movement, and reality to veer between political sensitivity and the obscure margins. Only occasionally does it gain what policy analysts often refer to as traction. Partly this is because public health tends to be about the big picture of society, and thus threatens vested interests. Also, public...
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This series of short communications introduces and celebrates the occasion of World Nutrition Rio2012, and looks ahead. There is another series published in the May issue (Available on RG) Our contributors, this month and next month, have been asked to write within a standard framework, based on their knowledge and experience, in a style comparab...
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Adam Oliver (doi:10.1136/bmj.d2168) maintains that nudges may help people to make healthier choices, but Geof Rayner and Tim Lang worry that government proposals are little more than publicly endorsed marketing
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This paper draws together contributions to a scientific table discussion on obesity at the European Science Open Forum 2008 which took place in Barcelona, Spain. Socioeconomic dimensions of global obesity, including those factors promoting it, those surrounding the social perceptions of obesity and those related to integral public health solutions,...
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This paper suggests that current models of public health are no longer sufficient as a means for understanding the health challenges of the anthropogenic age, and argues for an alternative based upon an ecological model. The roots of this perspective originated within the Victorian era, although it found only limited expression at that time. Ecolog...
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This article reviews the food sustainability challenges facing the 27-nation member European Union (EU). It describes the evolution of sustainable development policy in Europe against the background of the EU's evolution and diverse membership, with particular reference to agriculture and food. It argues that while sustainability challenges in agri...
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This article argues that public health historically evolved in Britain as a multidisciplinary project. The return to its multidisciplinary roots remains an essential but insufficient condition for its future success. Despite its part-emergence from the 'new public health', institutional public health is hampered by short-term strategies and a preoc...
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Trade liberalization remains at the forefront of debates around globalization, particularly around the impact on agriculture and food. These debates, which often focus on how poorer countries can 'trade their way' out of poverty, pay limited attention to dietary health, especially in the light of the WHO's Global Strategy for Diet, Physical Activit...
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In Europe, concerns about obesity have been stimulated by trends in several member states, raising challenges for multilevel governance. This paper gives a picture of obesity in Europe, pointing to variations between and within countries. It discusses the various explanations of generalized weight gain, and the policy levers that might tackle it, t...
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International experience of Policy Councils on food and nutrition has developed over recent decades but they have not received the attention that is due to them. The 1992 International Conference on Nutrition recommended that governments create Food Policy Councils but few have been created. There has been more experience in local and sub-national...

Citations

... An ecological approach to Public Health policy (Rayner & Lang, 2012) is based on the principle that health is dependent on the synchronisation of the natural environment and people. This approach recognises "humans as part of the ecosystem, not separate from it, though not central to it" (Bentley, 2014, p.528). ...
... Poor diet is a key determinant of NCDs, and a serious global public health problem [8,9]. Diets high in fat (saturated fats and trans-fatty acids), free sugars and salt, and low in fruit and vegetable consumption in particular are risk factors for NCDs [10,11]. The factors involved in dietary choices include income, food prices, individual preferences and beliefs, cultural traditions, and social and economic factors, all of which shape dietary patterns [2,12,13]. ...
... In this paper, mostly based on qualitative and quantitative information from available scientific and grey literature, a health profile of Soqotra population has been drafted. With particular emphasis being given to risk factors, adopting an ecological public health perspective (Lang & Rayner 2012), and the "one health" approach (One Health Initiative Task Force 2008, King 2008); the latter defined as "the collaborative effort of multiple disciplines…to attain optimal health for people, animals and the environment". ...
... Taking a socioecological approach allows us to improve interventions across multiple system levels which lead to solutions not only within the health system but also through across political, physical, socio-cultural and other structures in society. Socio-ecological models hold great value in considering the interaction of behaviours across multiple levels of influence and lead to multi-level suggestions for interventions to effectively influence behaviour [27,[30][31][32]. Some socio-ecological models see cultural context as important in interventions [33,34]. ...
... More importantly, previous studies have shown that central obesity correlates with an increasing risk of cardiometabolic diseases such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and coronary heart disease independent of weight and body mass index (6)(7)(8). Keaver et al. reported that overweight and obesity will be reach 89 and 85% in males and females, respectively, until 2030 (9)(10)(11). It has been shown that central obesity is prevalent in Asian adults, particularly in older adults and women (12). ...
... Research has recognised that health is a product of the interdependence between humans and environmental determinants ranging from 'provision of the ecosystem services of food, water, and air, to more nuanced stressreducing and social capital services, to the role of forests in mitigating the health threats posed by climate change' ( [10]:1006). From an ecological viewpoint, researchers theorised that public health should address four dimensions consisting of 'material' referring to physical building blocks on which life depends; 'biological' involving bio-physiological processes including animal and plant species; 'cultural' concerning interpersonal relationships, community and family traditions; and 'social' related to institutions between people in terms of laws, social arrangements, conventions, and frameworks ( [11]:3). To explore underlying mechanisms linking urban environments to public health and social equity, four principles for an ecological public health model were proposed comprising 'conviviality' , 'equity' , 'global responsibility' and 'sustainability' ( [12]:528). ...
... One health approaches have demonstrated the importance of antimicrobial use in agriculture and the dispersion of those drugs in the environment in the causal chain of resistance. Policies that do not address those drivers from a wide ecological perspective are therefore likely to fail [19]. ...
... Public health concerns such as nutrition are multifactorial by nature. Multidimensional effects can be induced by very simple or even single interventions within rather complex interactions [17]. Plans and policies can be made that are spot targeted to the food and nutrition problems rather than more indirect mechanisms related to marketing, retailing, trading, farming, food processing, general education followed by regulations, and economic authorization. ...
... This was important for students to consider, as it has been previously identified that consumer capacity is limited to respond to environmental sustainability issues without government and industry support ( Edwards et al., 2011). Nutrition science professionals need to engage in systems thinking (analyse a sustainability problem from a holistic perspective or across different domains and scales) to adequately understand and ultimately act effectively ( Rayner and Lang, 2012b;Wilkins et al., 2010). The questions posed attempted to extend students, to situate consumer actions within the broader political and social context, developing their understanding of the multiple determinants of food consumption and food systems. ...
... ),Herrick (2009),Lang (2010),Dorfman et al. (2012) andRaine (2012), CSR initiatives declaring the intention to promote health bring about a displacement of responsibilities for unhealthy eating habits from the industry to the consumer, whilst, at the same time, participate to scaling back of the government's investment in citizen and consumer protection.Lang (2010 p. 341) looks at CSR supermarket health campaigns promoting the idea of "eat well, move more, live longer", concluding they are misleading in what they incentivise exercise and fund sports equipment and structures, whilst failing to promote a reduction in eating, or proceeding on cutting on the levels of salts, fats and sugars, and portion size. Herrick(2009), looking at the CSR initiatives of the food and drink sector, re-affirms the initiatives' focus on sedentary life habits rather than product formulation and marketing, highlighting how such focus is prone to a narrow understanding of health contrary to the health promotion approach, and to dynamics of victim-blaming "cast in the language of consumer empowerment and choice" (p. ...