Gavin Hales's research while affiliated with University of Essex and other places

Publications (3)

Article
This paper examines the politics of mobility which surrounded the London 2012 Olympics. We provide a critical discussion of the mobility conflicts, problems and criticisms which emerged from our research with local people in the Stratford and wider Newham areas of London, where most Olympic events were located. The paper is divided into four broad...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the diverse forms of public opposition, protest, criticism, and complaint in the United Kingdom on the staging of the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games in London. Our discussion draws heavily on empirical research, primarily fieldwork and interviews in East London with local residents, opposition groups, business people, polit...
Article
This paper explores the characteristics of local drugs markets through the examination of a single London borough case study. The picture that emerges in a borough not known for having a ‘drugs problem’ is of an entrenched, thriving and widespread drugs economy. Crucially, it is embedded within the local communities. Most worryingly, crack cocaine...

Citations

... One of the main realms in which political protest is most evident is sport events, where political and/or human rights movements, such as the Black Live Matters or the Climate movement find as a hub to promote their ideals during major national and/or global sporting events (Carney, 2016;Mundt et al., 2018;Galily, 2019Galily, , 2021. Specifically, the issue of sport and protest is evident before mega global sport events such as the Summer Olympic Games and the soccer World Cup, where activists have a chance of promoting their ideas to a large-scale international audience (Giulianotti et al., 2015;Lauermann, 2019). In some cases, the hosts of mega sport events have also been the target of global protest due to their policies (Qi et al., 2009;Horne, 2017). ...
... Specifically, it seeks to explore how and why events enable and/or produce new spatial (re)configurations when staged and how these changes influence mobility, exploration, engagement and/or consumption across host environmentswhether at an international, national, regional, city and/or community level. Events, irrespective of their size and composition, influence the way people move, explore, engage with and/or consume the urban environments that stage them (Giulianotti et al. 2015;Mhanna, Blake, and Jones 2017). They are often managed in private venues, yet are increasingly staged in public spaces like street, squares and parks (Smith 2016). ...
... This study revealed transition away from the traditional drug dealing model, characterised by 'local drugs for local people' (Harding, 2020: 40) and run by local crime families, to more dynamic models dependent upon local factors. The first new model, 'commuting' (Coomber and Moyle, 2018;Hales and Hobbs, 2010) is perhaps the most well known, with urban-based groups moving into new markets by using children from cities to transport drugs to rural areas. The ethnicity of these children reflected the ethnicity of the urban-based group, with black children from Londonbased groups, Asian children from Birmingham-based groups and white children from Liverpool or Manchester-based groups (National Crime Agency, 2017). ...