Gareth J. Norton's research while affiliated with University of Aberdeen and other places

Publications (4)

Article
Full-text available
Ongoing climate change is resulting in increasing areas of salinity affected soils, rising saline groundwater and droughts resulting in irrigation with brackish water. This leads to increased salinity stress in crops that are already grown on marginal agricultural lands, such as barley. Tolerance to salinity stress is limited in the elite barley cu...
Article
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Barley 'Scald' is an economically damaging fungal disease that is a global problem, causing significant yield and economical losses in the UK barley feed and malting industries. Presently, a limited number of Rhynchosporium resistance genes exist, but selective pressures on the fungi cause the demand for new sources of resistance. Landraces, such a...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims: Manganese (Mn) deficiency in barley is a global problem. It is difficult to detect in the early stages of symptom development and is commonly pre-emptively corrected by Mn foliar sprays that can be costly. Landraces adapted to marginal lands around the world represent a genetic resource for potential sustainability traits incl...

Citations

... Trials were grown in a climate-controlled glasshouse with a day/night temperature of 15/18 • C and supplementary lighting (at 200 µmol quanta m −2 s −1 ) provided when light intensity was less than 200 W m −2 and shading when above 450 Wm −2 to give a day length of 16 h [as outlined in Cope et al. (2021)]. Relative humidity was not controlled. ...
... This result is similar and often higher than other reports of 39,733 SNPs (Darrier et al., 2019); 33,818 SNPs (Novakazi et al., 2020) and 37.242 SNPs (Cope et al., 2020). The highest number of SNPs was found on chromosomes 5H and 2H, respectively, while chromosome 1H contained the least number of SNPs accordingly with Bayer et al. (2017). ...
... Furthermore, heavy metal(loids) contamination can also lead to the decline and deterioration of soil fertility and environmental quality, respectively [2]. Soil metal(loids) concentrations and soil conditions markedly influence the magnitude of metal(loids) accumulated in rice [3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10]. The accumulation of metal(loids) in rice grain is not only dependent on soil metal(loids) concentration but also on actual soil growth conditions [11,12]. For instance, Farrow et al. [13] reported a strong and positive linear correlation between soil As and grain As in rice grown under anoxic conditions. ...