Gabrielle LaBove's research while affiliated with Johns Hopkins University and other places

Publications (6)

Article
Medical tourism, or traveling abroad to obtain medical services, has evolved into a global health care phenomenon, with over 15 million U.S. patients each year seeking medical care internationally, representing a $50 billion dollar industry in 2017. Speculation and media fascination about the growing industry, diverse destinations, and rationale be...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Operating costs are a significant part of delivering surgical care. Having a system to analyze these costs is imperative for decision making and efficiency. We present an analysis of surgical supply, labor and administrative costs, and remuneration of procedures as a means for a practice to analyze their cost effectiveness; this affec...
Article
Full-text available
Background: A best practice goal to reduce surgical site infection includes administration of antibiotics in the ideal preoperative window. This article evaluates an office surgical suite antibiotic administration rate and compares it with the timing of a local hospital treating a similar patient population. The hypothesis was that similar or bette...
Article
Two recent articles in Aesthetic Surgery Journal —by Alter1 and Bloom et al2—have addressed techniques for monsplasty, combined with either labia majora reduction or abdominoplasty, for massive weight loss patients. The techniques by Alter and Bloom et al also have a common theme: defatting and vertical pull.1,2 The problem with these techniques i...

Citations

... 16 "Medical tourism"-traveling abroad to obtain medical services-is relevant to HSCT. 12 Over 15 million US patients travel internationally for medical care. 17 In that study, 67.7% of patients who lived in the US traveled to other countries to receive HSCT. Monterrey and Puebla in Mexico were the most common destinations; Moscow, Russia was second. ...
... It can also result in significant costs savings, as operating room time is estimated to cost $36-$37 per min [16]. Despite similar surgeon reimbursements, office-based procedures have demonstrated significantly lower costs compared to similar procedures in an operating room setting [16,17]. Our data suggest that MMS is a safe procedure to perform in the office with patients who require over 30 mL of locally injected anesthesia. ...
... The Surgical Care Improvement Project recommends IV antibiotic prophylaxis between 30 and 59 minutes of incision (2 hours for vancomycin and fluoroquinolones). [101][102][103] Preoperative antibiotics should be tailored to the patient; cefazolin, or clindamycin in those with beta-lactam allergies, is commonly used. If the surgery lasts over 4 hours, repeat dosing is indicated. ...
... 28 The Top Hat method was modified in 2014 by combining it with base imbrication. 29 Debono and Rao suggested a sinusoidal excision technique for male nipple hypertrophy to reduce height. 30 This method was later modified by van den Berg and van der Lei to avoid dog ears. ...
... The vertical limbs of the pi closely parallel the pudendal cleft and labia majora (Fig. 1). For the two triangles on each side of the pudendal cleft, surgical incisions form their superior and medial borders [5,6]. ...