Gabriel R. Valle's research while affiliated with California State University, San Marcos and other places

Publications (3)

Article
Full-text available
Amidst the recent threat of COVID-19, home gardens have surged in popularity as seed companies and nurseries find it challenging to keep their supplies fully stocked. The victory garden movement that emerged during WWII has today re-emerged as COVID victory gardens. Yet, the global changes and cognitive shifts associated with COVID-19 have differen...
Article
This study uses ethnographic narratives of a Santa Clara Valley community of urban gardeners gathered from 2012 to 2016 to investigate the lived realities and struggles of creating an actually existing home garden commons. Many of these gardeners are recent immigrants for rural Mexico, Central American, and South East Asia, and many descend from ru...
Article
This essay reflects on the experiential learning of place and place-making in the ESS curriculum, and contributes to the literature on critical place-based education. This paper discusses “narratives of place” as part of a critical race theoretical framework that provides grounding for the pedagogical tools of experiential learning, storytelling, a...

Citations

... The United Kingdom's "Dig for Victory" campaign during WWI promoted home gardening, not only for food security reasons, but also for effects on people's sense of trust and as an extension of government order into the domestic sphere [1]. The COVID-19 pandemic has witnessed a return to these historical events in the search for solutions to food security in times of crisis [2,3]. ...
... Yet the apprenticeship model of most doctoral programs means that many mentors struggle to prepare their mentees for careers beyond academia (Patterson et al. 2019), careers which many students feel are stigmatized (Shmatko et al. 2020) since the academic path is still regarded as the primary destination for a PhD. Alongside these trends runs the persistent need for environmental education to confront and remedy the field's history of exclusion and Eurocentrism (Valle 2021), by advancing a more just and inclusive vision of sustainability within the academy and beyond. This begs the question: how can interdisciplinary environmental PhD programs train a diverse array of scholars to advance integrative, inclusive and societally-relevant work while preparing graduates for an unconventional and uncertain professional future? ...