G. Dirk Mateer's research while affiliated with The University of Arizona and other places

Publications (8)

Article
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Economists study how incentives motivate human behavior. However, besides grades, professors do not frequently employ incentives to motivate students in the classroom. Possibly because expenses associated with classroom incentives often remain unreimbursed or because other implementation costs are high. In this paper, we demonstrate methods educato...
Article
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We asked economic educators from around the country to identify five films that they found most useful in teaching economics. Our sample of 105 educators reflects wide-ranging opinions about the greatest films for teaching economics. We provide summaries of each of the Top 10 films in our list and short descriptions of the next 10. The films survey...
Article
Bazinganomics.com is designed to provide instructors with clips, explanations, and lesson plans related to economics concepts from TV’s 2nd most-watched broadcast show of the 2014-2015 season, CBS’s The Big Bang Theory. The site contains approximately 100 clips. As the show continues to air (currently signed through the 2016-2017 season) the author...
Article
Full-text available
Today's multitasking media generation of students, the M2 generation, has widespread and historically low-cost access to media players, smartphones, computers, and gaming units. This article explains how content that is rich in economics can help instructors connect in meaningful and purposeful ways with students through television and movie clips,...

Citations

... Previous literature in the economics and business administration field backs the use of visual clips from videos and movies in both the classroom and online (Acchiardo & Vachris, 2018;Mateer et al., , 2016Mateer & Stephenson, 2011;Sexton, 2006), as well as the versatility, convenience and speed of digital platforms (YouTube, HBO Netflix, Amazon Prime Video). These tools help to avoid students' general boredom with such classes as they are typically based on complicated theoretical and economic concepts (Colander, 2006), and mostly taught by somewhat traditional learning methods that are not student-centered (Lombardi et al., 2004). ...
... The use of pop culture in the classroom has varied from using brief scenes from hit television shows like The Big Bang Theory (Tierney et al. 2016), Breaking Bad (Muchiri, Paraschiv and Wooten, 2022), and Seinfeld (Ghent, Grant, and Lesica 2011), to using entire films like Moneyball (Wooten and White 2018) and Harry Potter (Podemska-Mikluch & Deyo 2014). The Walt Disney Company is directly and indirectly connected with many of the teaching resources that have been developed over the past decade. ...
... 2011-present, N > 400), organized into teaching ideas and media relevant to key concepts, provides clips from his lectures and found popular media (see "Gangs of New York," Mateer, n.d.). Mateer also has published significant scholarship on media integration (e.g., Ferrarini & Mateer, 2014;Mateer, O'Roark, & Holder, 2016;Mateer & Stephenson, 2011), contributed to a useful website on that topic (see Mateer, Ghent, Porter, & Purdom, 2014), and most recently, collaborated on several edited-content OVRs (see below). ...
... For shorter clips, like those found on show-specific websites or clip agglomerators (Mateer 2012, Wooten 2017, playing the clip in the middle of the class could serve to break monotony of a traditional lecture. Smaller clips could be used to segue between topics or to move from theory to application. ...
Citing article
... Leet and Houser (2003) demonstrate how clips from popular films can be used to illustrate economic concepts, and Mateer (2005) does the same in a student workbook. Popular television series, including The Simpsons, The Big Bang Theory, The Office, and Seinfeld, have likewise been used to relate economic concepts to students (Ghent, Grant, & Lesica, 2011;Hall, 2005;Kuester, Mateer, & Youderian, 2014;Luccasen & Thomas, 2010;Tierney, Mateer, Smith, Wooten, & Geerling,. 2016). ...
... Cowen (1984) and Willingham (2009) both claim that using visual media in teaching rather than text alone makes concepts more accessible to a student, promoting deep learning rather than rote learning, and helping with later recall. This research on student learning preferences is the motivation for The Ultimate Guide to Teaching Macro/Microeconomics (Geerling & Mateer, 2014), which includes more than 1,000 teaching techniques designed to increase engagement. ...