Fumi Hayano's research while affiliated with Yokohama City University and other places

Publications (8)

Article
Aim: Numerous reports have described differences in the distribution of orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) sulcogyral patterns between patients with schizophrenia (SZ patients) and healthy controls (HCs). Alterations in OFC morphology are also observed in those at high risk for developing SZ and in first-episode SZ, suggesting that genetic associations ma...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous brain regions are believed to be involved in the neuropathology of panic disorder (PD) including fronto-limbic regions, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. However, while several previous studies have demonstrated volumetric gray matter reductions in these brain regions, there have been no studies evaluating volumetric white matter chang...
Article
The sulcogyral pattern of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is characterized by a remarkable inter-individual variability that likely reflects neurobehavioral traits and genetic aspects of neurodevelopment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the OFC sulcogyral pattern of patients with schizophrenia (SZ) and healthy controls (HC) to determine...
Article
Although recent studies suggest abnormalities of the cerebral cortex, limbic structures, and brain stem regions in panic disorder (PD), the extent to which the midbrain is associated with PD pathophysiology is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate structural abnormalities of the midbrain using magnetic resonance imaging and to determine...
Article
The posterior region of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), which forms its sulcogyral pattern during neurodevelopment, receives multisensory inputs. The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship between posterior OFC sulcogyral pattern and OFC volume difference in patients with panic disorder. The anatomical pattern of the posterior...
Article
While clinical features of panic disorder show significant sexual dimorphism, previous structural MRI studies have not sufficiently controlled for sex when looking at regional brain abnormalities in panic disorder. Using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM), regional gray matter volume was compared between 24 patients (male/female: 9/15) with pa...
Article
Aims: Anxiety a core feature of panic disorder, is linked to function of the amygdala. Volume alterations in the brain of patients with panic disorder have previously been reported, but there has been no report of amygdala volume association with anxiety. Methods: Volumes of hippocampus and amygdala were manually measured using magnetic resonanc...

Citations

... These findings suggest that related-psychotic pattern of abnormalities or changes differ according to the type of disorder, which might interpret the early symptoms and severity according to the affected brain regions [63][64][65] . Divers cortical regions, including OFC and fusiform gyrus, were found to be significant contributors to vulnerability to psychosis, particularly in light of emotional processing dysfunction [65][66][67][68] . The OFC is a crucial node for emotional information processing 69 . ...
... Brain imaging studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have shown that patients with PD have structural and functional abnormalities in the brain regions involved in fear-related emotional processing, including the amygdala (Asami et al., 2018;Demenescu et al., 2013;Hayano et al., 2009;Massana et al., 2003;Pfleiderer et al., 2007), cingulate cortex (Asami et al., 2008;Bystritsky et al., 2001;Uchida et al., 2008), insula (Engel et al., 2016;Kang et al., 2017;Lai and Wu, 2012), and the fronto-temporal areas (Bystritsky et al., 2001;Kang et al., 2017;Lai and Wu, 2012;Vythilingam et al., 2000;Wu et al., 2018) compared to healthy controls (HCs). However, these findings focusing on a local brain region are not as sufficient as biomarkers to support clinical decision-making for PD, since it is a brain disorder in which the pathogenesis is associated with aberrant neuronal structures and activity at the network level (Cosci and Mansueto, 2019;Konishi et al., 2014). The characterization of structural and functional brain connectivity provides rich information regarding circuit organization and assembly among distant brain regions. ...
... Research efforts to identify reliable biomarkers representative of the neurobiology underlying PD have focused on the fear network, which is hypothesized to be the core neural substrate of PD, resulting in the external manifestation of panic attacks and related symptoms (Goddard, 2017;Gorman et al., 2000;Santos et al., 2015;Sobanski and Wagner, 2017). Brain imaging studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have shown that patients with PD have structural and functional abnormalities in the brain regions involved in fear-related emotional processing, including the amygdala (Asami et al., 2018;Demenescu et al., 2013;Hayano et al., 2009;Massana et al., 2003;Pfleiderer et al., 2007), cingulate cortex (Asami et al., 2008;Bystritsky et al., 2001;Uchida et al., 2008), insula (Engel et al., 2016;Kang et al., 2017;Lai and Wu, 2012), and the fronto-temporal areas (Bystritsky et al., 2001;Kang et al., 2017;Lai and Wu, 2012;Vythilingam et al., 2000;Wu et al., 2018) compared to healthy controls (HCs). However, these findings focusing on a local brain region are not as sufficient as biomarkers to support clinical decision-making for PD, since it is a brain disorder in which the pathogenesis is associated with aberrant neuronal structures and activity at the network level (Cosci and Mansueto, 2019;Konishi et al., 2014). ...
... Studies have found that patients with psychosis have an increased prevalence of Types II and III patterns in the right hemisphere, suggesting that these patterns could serve as markers of schizophrenia [2,4,9,20,24,26,33,35]. In addition, the Type III OFC pattern may also serve as a marker in individuals at a higher risk of developing long-term cannabis use [6,22]. ...
... A previous meta-analysis of PD conducted by our research group revealed significant volume reductions in the right insula [extending to the PoCG, right inferior frontal gyrus, rolandic operculum, superior temporal gyrus (STG) and putamen], median cingulate/paracingulate gyrus, and SFG (13). In addition, some researchers have reported significant volume reductions in parietal regions (14) and the THA (15) in PD patients, whereas significant increases in volume have been found in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), midbrain (16) and cuneus (17). The PoCG has been associated with functions of receiving, integrating, and interpreting most of the sensory information in the human body (18). ...
... All these results suggested that the VLO may play an anti-anxiety role. In a human image study, gray matter volume of the OFC was associated with increased optimism, which in turn was associated with reduced anxiety [19], on the contrary, the reduced volume of the OFC was associated with anxiety in patients with panic disorder [35]. On the other hand, anxiety elicited the disruption of the OFC by reducing the firing rat of spontaneously active neuronal subpopulations [36]. ...
... A previous meta-analysis of PD conducted by our research group revealed significant volume reductions in the right insula [extending to the PoCG, right inferior frontal gyrus, rolandic operculum, superior temporal gyrus (STG) and putamen], median cingulate/paracingulate gyrus, and SFG (13). In addition, some researchers have reported significant volume reductions in parietal regions (14) and the THA (15) in PD patients, whereas significant increases in volume have been found in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), midbrain (16) and cuneus (17). The PoCG has been associated with functions of receiving, integrating, and interpreting most of the sensory information in the human body (18). ...