Fouad Bendimerad's research while affiliated with Risk Management Solutions, Inc. and other places

Publications (21)

Technical Report
Full-text available
This report is intended to serve data and information needs from researchers, practitioners and policy makers on this particular earthquake event. The objective is to collect and put in a single reference relevant perishable data, scientific information, and observations framed in the context of the disaster risk management and reduction laws, regu...
Article
Full-text available
The paper discussed how spatial thinking can be promoted, albeit implicitly, to local government officials through disaster risk management planning. It drew lessons from a multi-year, multi-partner Disaster Risk Management Master Planning program developed and implemented by the Earthquakes and Megacities Initiative, an international scientific NG...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The research project provides a case study to address the knowledge gap on the level of preparedness of cities to address specific challenges posed by the risk of health emergencies. Improving frontline efforts in urban communities regarding health emergency risk management was envisioned to go a long way in strengthening health systems in urban se...
Chapter
Global earthquake statistics shows that in the long-term average, each year the globe is hit by one event in excess of (moment) magnitude 8.0 and by 18 events in excess of magnitude 7.0. Clearly if these events strike in the vicinity of an urbanised area high damage and high mortality and casualty rates can be expected. For instance on July 28, 197...
Article
We review the definitions, population trends, and characteristics of megacities. Characteristics of megacities are, apart from their size, their complexity in terms of administration, infrastructure, traffic, etc., and at the same time the speed of change. Vulnerabilities and risk potential are discussed using the examples of Mexico City and Mumbai...
Article
AIP Conference Proceedings 825(1), 152 (2006) DOI: http://doi.org/10.1063/1.2190751

Citations

... The Disaster Resilience Index (DRI) was developed as a monitoring and evaluation tool for benchmarking and measuring progress (or lack of progress) on the mainstreaming of risk reduction and resilience approaches in the city's development policies and processes (Khazai and Bendimerad, 2011a). The structure of the DRI is based on key thematic areas of resilience in cities and linked to EMI's analytical Disaster Risk Management Master Planning (DRMMP) model, which consists of strategies, policies, actions and processes for mainstreaming disaster risk reduction at the local level through a participatory planning process (Bendimerad et al., 2016). The DRI is a self-assessment tool which aims to establish an initial benchmark and obtain consistent and objective evaluations around 10 indicators grouped along five thematic areas: 1) legal and institutional processes; 2) Awareness and capacity building; 3) Critical services and infrastructure resiliency; 4) Emergency preparedness, response and recovery planning; and 5) Developmental planning, regulation and risk mitigation. ...
... The UDRi approach outlined in the Guidebook remains essentially the same holistic, systematic, multi-step process, however, the stakeholder-validated implementation of the methodology presented in the Guidebook has been further refined through numerous applications and projects in cities across the world and updated with lessons learned from each of these case studies. Together with its partners at Urban Disaster Risk Indicators have also been successfully implemented with stakeholders by EMI in Metro Manila (Fernandez et al., 2006); Istanbul (Khazai et al., 2008;Khazai et al., 2009;Kilic et al., 2012), Amman (EMI, 2009), Pasig (EMI, 2012), Quezon City (Bendimerad et al., 2013), Mumbai (Khazai et al., 2011a(Khazai et al., , 2011b and Dhaka (EMI, 2014). In this Guidebook we present in detail the application of this method in Istanbul, Mumbai, Medellín, Bogotá D.C. and Manizales. ...
... In general, disaster studies have focused a lot on community involvement in disaster management such as Oktari et al. (2018), Ikeda andNagasaka (2011), Cronjé, Reyneke andVan Wyk (2013), and Aka et al. (2017). Furthermore, the more specific involvement of local communities with their wisdom in disaster management has been found by Berse, Bendimerad and Asami (2011), Rapeli et al. (2017), Rozi (2017), and Kusumasari and Alam (2012). The use of community participation with local values has successfully proved that the severity of the impact of disasters is because of the weakness of top-down disaster management strategies that ignore local potential resources and capacities (Kapiarsa & Sariffuddin 2018). ...
... Universality: GSI was put forward as a universal technology for earthquake safety in the first place. When the last few decades have seen rapid urbanisation in high-population developing countries (Wenzel et al. 2007) and the high death tolls in a series of major earthquakes, it is an undeniable responsibility of earthquake engineering professionals to face this challenge head-on (Comartin et al. 2004). Hopefully, GSI can play a part here. ...