Fiona Sunquist's research while affiliated with University of Florida and other places

Publications (8)

Chapter
The evolutionary fitness of any predator, whether it is a spider catching insects or a lion hunting buffalo, depends largely on the quality and quantity of its diet. Predatory strategies are shaped and refined by natural selection to maximize nutrient intake within the bounds of a wide range of ecological constraints (e.g., prey density, habitat) t...
Article
Tiger Moon is the powerful, poetic story of the Sunquists' two years studying tigers in Nepal—traveling by elephant, avoiding a rhino attack, and learning to recognize individual tigers by roar. A new afterword tells the story of promising efforts to reconnect fractured Nepalese tiger habitats.

Citations

... Although jaguar habitat use has been associated with water in South America (Mondolfi & Hoogesteijn, 1986;Núñez et al., 2002;Sollmann et al., 2012), likely due to higher presence of prey such as capybaras (Hydrochoerus spp.) and caimans (Caiman spp.) (Crawshaw & Quigley, 1991;Emmons, 1987), Monroy-Vilchis et al. (2008) suggested human activity may displace large cats away from watercourses and towards higher elevations with steeper slopes. Given the likely more-dominant jaguar (Harmsen et al., 2009;Sollmann et al., 2012;Sunquist & Sunquist, 2002) used these high-use and highelevation ridgelines, pumas may have used lower-elevation water systems such as rivers to avoid interactions with jaguars. Furthermore, Boron et al. (2020) found differential use of water sources between species, as jaguar habitat use was associated with wetland habitat, while puma habitat use was higher near streams and ponds. ...
... The jaguar (Panthera onca) is the largest felid in the Neotropics and, for many, it is the most powerful conservation symbol of the Amazon (Sunquist & Sunquist, 2002). Due to its individually large spatial requirements and key ecological role as the principal predator of the Neotropics, the jaguar is also considered an umbrella species (Thornton et al., 2016;Jędrzejewski et al.,2018), and its absence would cause trophic cascades, impacting prey populations, and affect the overall ecosystem dynamics (Cavalcanti & Gese, 2009). ...
... Jaguars (Panthera onca) are apex predators in Neotropical forests that usually occur at low densities (Maffei et al. 2011, Noss et al. 2012 and have a relatively low reproduction rate, usually one or two cubs every three years (Seymour 1989). These characteristics, make them sensitive to threats such as habitat loss, reduction of wild prey, preventative and retaliatory killing as a result of conflict with livestock, and illegal killing for black-market trade (Weber & Rabinowitz 1996, Gittleman et al. 2001, Sunquist & Sunquist 2001, Reuter et al. 2018. The continuous increase in these threats has led to the decline and isolation of jaguar populations, considering them near threatened throughout their entire range (Quigley et al 2017). ...
... Predation on langur and muntjak was almost similar in both the study sites. Leopards are known to prefer prey ranging from small to medium size within a weight range of 10-40 kg (Henschel et al. 2005) and such species are considered the leopard's most energetically profitable prey (Sunquist and Sunquist 1989). The low percentage of wild pig in the diet of leopard in both the study areas may be attributable to its inability to handle comparable weight of its aggressive prey (Karanth and Sunquist 1995). ...
... Dentro de la Familia Didelphidae, el género Didelphis es uno de los más ampliamente distribuidos con dos especies: Didelphis virginiana y Didelphis marsupialis (Ringier 1961;Gardner 1973;Sunquist et al. 1987). D. marsupialis se distribuye desde el sureste de México, a través de América Central y el norte de Sudamérica, desde el nivel del mar hasta los 2000 msnm (Gardner 1993). ...
... Age was estimated based on tooth wear and colour, body size, presence of facial scars from territorial disputes and nipple coloration (Johansson et al. 2016). Because large felids grow slowly and do not reach full adult size until 4-5 years of age (Sunquist and Sunquist 2002) and snow leopards are unlikely to reproduce before three years age (Johansson et al. 2021), we classified snow leopards less than or 3 years of age as subadults following Johansson et al. (2016). We provide measurements for body mass (total weight), body length (tip of the nose to base of the tail), tail length (base of the tail to the tip of the last caudal vertebra) and shoulder height (heel of front paw to top of the shoulder blade), see Fig. 2. For individuals that were captured and measured more than once, we provide the average of all measurements except if the animal transitioned between age classes. ...
... In current times, managers are challenged by tigers that injure or kill humans and cattle or take up temporary residence in farmlands (Singh 1970, Greenough 2003, Shukla 2013. Ostensibly, conservation measures to increase vulnerable tiger populations may in some cases exacerbate human-tiger conflict (Sunquist and Sunquist, 1988), and this has led to a polarized debate on tiger conservation in India (Narain et al 2005, Karanth 2011), particularly with regard to the presence of human settlements within tiger habitats, and access of the public to forest resources. ...