Fangping Jia's research while affiliated with Zhejiang University and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide. Among the structural proteins of HCV, the HCV core protein has the ability to regulate gene transcription, lipid metabolism, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy, all of which are closely related to the development o...
Article
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Previous studies have revealed that a high-fat diet is one of the key contributors to the progression of liver fibrosis, and increasing studies are devoted to analyzing the different influences of diverse fat sources on the progression of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. When we treated three types of isocaloric diets that are rich in cholesterol, sa...
Article
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Background and aims: Dietary restriction (DR) is a preventive strategy for obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Although an interconnection between obesity, metabolic syndrome, fatty liver, and hepatocellular carcinoma has been documented, the mechanism and impact of DR on steatosis-derived hepatocarcinogenesis are no...
Article
Previous studies suggested that high consumption of saturated fatty acid (SFA) is a risk factor for liver cancer. However, it remains unclear how dietary SFA affects liver tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the impact of a SFA-rich diet on hepatic tumorigenesis using hepatitis C virus core gene transgenic (HCVcpTg) mice that spontaneous...
Article
Excess consumption of trans-fatty acid (TFA), an unsaturated fatty acid containing trans double bonds, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about the link between TFA and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) despite it being a frequent form of cancer in humans. In the current study, the impact...
Article
Full-text available
Previous epidemiological studies have suggested a link between high-cholesterol intake and liver disease progression, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the precise mechanism of hepatotoxicity and hepatocarcinogenesis caused by excessive cholesterol consumption remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the impact of dietary cholester...

Citations

... Especially, liver fibrogenesis and tumorigenesis are progressive in the long term, with complicated mechanisms. Therefore, animal and cell studies would provide clue to clarify the impact of specific dietary fat on the progression of liver disease [13]. ...
... Epidemiological and preclinical studies have shown that lifestyle, including dietary habits, is also implicated in fibrosis development of some organs, such as the liver [3]. Dietary habits are particularly important in subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or chronic viral hepatitis. ...
... Liver nuclear fractions were isolated using NE-PER ® Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Extraction Reagents (Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc.) containing protease and phosphatase inhibitor (100-fold dilution, Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc.). Protein concentrations were measured colorimetrically with a BCA Protein Assay kit (Pierce, Rockford, IL, USA) [29]. Whole liver lysates (40-60 µg protein in each lane) were separated by 7.5-15% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), which was dependent on the molecular weight of the target protein for western blot analysis. ...
... To uncover the influence of a diet enriched in cholesterol, saturated fatty acids (SFA), and trans fatty acids (TFA) on hepatic steatosis and ensuing liver disorders, hepatitis C virus core gene transgenic (HCVcpTg) mice that spontaneously developed hepatic steatosis without apparent fibrosis were used [14][15][16][17]. When we treated three types of isocaloric diets that are rich in cholesterol, SFA, and TFA with HCVcpTg mice, TFA and cholesterolrich diet, but not SFA-rich diet, displayed the distinct hepatic fibrosis [18][19][20]. Such diets are closely associated with cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, colorectal cancer, and metabolic syndrome [21,22]. ...
... A trans-fatty acid (TFA)-rich diet promoted the proliferation of bile ducts. The expression of DR indicators and hepatic precursor markers (Krt19, Afp, Epcam, and Cd133 mRNAs) was higher in TFA [69]. In addition, we observed increased expression of Krt19 and H2-Eb1 mRNA in the liver of HFD-fed animals. ...
... These concepts have been tested in several studies. It was suggested in an animal model study that a high-cholesterol diet could indeed promote steatohepatitis and liver tumorigenesis in HCV core protein expressing transgenic mice [143]. On the other hand, it was found that black raspberry extract showed protective effects against hypercholesterolemia and subsequently reduced hepatitis in rat models fed with high-fat/high-choline diets [144]. ...