Erin K. Kuprewicz's research while affiliated with University of Connecticut and other places

Publications (23)

Article
Full-text available
Understanding tropical biology is important for solving complex problems such as climate change, biodiversity loss, and zoonotic pandemics, but biology curricula view research mostly via a temperate-zone lens. Integrating tropical research into biology education is urgently needed to tackle these issues. Tropical biology is currently largely absent...
Article
Full-text available
Managing wildlife populations in the face of global change requires regular data on the abundance and distribution of wild animals but acquiring these over appropriate spatial scales in a sustainable way has proven challenging. Here we present the data from Snapshot USA 2020, a second annual national mammal survey of the United States of America. T...
Article
Phoresy, the use of another organism for dispersal, is one of the most intriguing commensalistic interactions. The selection of a correct host is fundamental for phoretic organisms to ensure arrival to suitable habitats and to encounter potential mates. This study focuses on a group of phoretic mites in the genus Lasioseius (Acari: Blattisociidae)....
Article
Full-text available
Managing wildlife populations in the face of global change requires regular data on the abundance and distribution of wild animals, but acquiring these over appropriate spatial scales in a sustainable way has proven challenging. Here we present the data from Snapshot USA 2020, a second annual national mammal survey of the locations across 103 array...
Article
Full-text available
With the accelerating pace of global change, it is imperative that we obtain rapid inventories of the status and distribution of wildlife for ecological inferences and conservation planning. To address this challenge, we launched the SNAPSHOT USA project, a collaborative survey of terrestrial wildlife populations using camera traps across the Unite...
Article
Almost 40 years ago, Terry L. Erwin published a seemingly audacious proposition: There may be as many as 30 million species of insects in the world. Here, we translate Erwin's verbal argument into a diversity-ratio model—the Erwin Equation of Biodiversity—and discuss how it has inspired other biodiversity estimates. We categorize, describe the assu...
Article
Full-text available
Determining organisms’ responses to novel temperatures is relevant from ecological, evolutionary, and conservation perspectives. Here, we have validated designs and included biological examples for three affordable devices to estimate thermal responses of ectotherms: (1) a water bath that can be programmed to increase temperatures to estimate an or...
Article
The physiological condition and immune responses of organisms living at different elevations are expected to display local adaptations to the different climatic and biotic conditions. Small ectotherms with specialized diets are highly susceptible to environmental change, as their life cycle is largely affected by temperature and by the presence of...
Article
Full-text available
Scatter‐hoarding animals can dramatically affect plant survival by depositing seeds in favorable microhabitats away from parent plants (seed dispersal) and by consuming seeds (seed predation). By understanding how scatter hoarders make seed dispersal decisions, we can infer how different plant chemical defenses or seed set strategies may influence...
Article
Symbiotic nitrogen (N)‐fixing plants have important effects on the biogeochemical processes of the sites they inhabit, but their ability to reach these sites is determined by the dispersal of their seeds. Differences in seed size and dispersal vectors of N‐fixing and non‐fixing plants could influence the spatial and temporal distributions of N fixe...
Article
Determining responses of organisms to changing temperatures is a research priority, as global warming threatens populations and ecosystems worldwide. Upper thermal limits are frequently measured as the critical thermal maximum (CTmax), a quick bioassay where organisms are exposed to increasing temperatures until individuals are not able to perform...
Article
1. The thermal adaptation hypothesis proposes that because thermoregulation involves a high metabolic cost, thermal limits of organisms must be locally adapted to temperatures experienced in their environments. There is evidence that tolerance to high temperatures decreases in insects inhabiting colder habitats and microclimates. However, it is not...
Article
The critical thermal maximum (CTmax), the temperature at which motor control is lost in animals, has the potential to determine if species will tolerate global warming. For insects, tolerance to high temperatures decreases with latitude, suggesting that similar patterns may exist along elevational gradients as well. This study explored how CTmax va...
Article
Full-text available
Scatter hoarding of seeds by animals contributes significantly to forest-level processes, including plant recruitment and forest community composition. However, the potential positive and negative effects of caching on seed survival, germination success, and seedling survival have rarely been assessed through experimental studies. Here, I tested th...
Article
We surveyed of 50 individuals of Heliconia uxpanapensis C. Gut. Báez, an understory herb common in the forest and trail sides of Los Tuxtlas Biological Station, a tropical rainforest. In these plants we found the presence of beetles of the genus Chelobasis in the Sierra de Los Tuxtlas, being the first record of the genus for Mexico. Los Tuxtlas is...
Article
To fully understand the ecology and evolution of plant–herbivore interactions, information regarding the life history of both immature and adult insect stages is essential. However, most knowledge of plant–herbivore associations is derived from observations of adults. One reason for this bias is that species identification of immature stages is usu...
Article
In Neotropical forests, mammals act as seed dispersers and predators. To prevent seed predation and promote dispersal, seeds exhibit physical or chemical defenses. Collared peccaries (Pecari tajacu) cannot eat some hard seeds, but can digest chemically defended seeds. Central American agoutis (Dasyprocta punctata) gnaw through hard-walled seeds, bu...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Central American agoutis (Dasyprocta punctata, Rodentia) bury a portion of the seeds they find in single, shallow subsurface caches – a process known as scatter-hoarding. Although the potential positive effects of scatter-hoarding on seeds have been well-studied, the negative effects of scatter-hoarding on seeds and re...
Article
To prevent seed losses from predation, plants have developed protective strategies. Seeds may utilize chemical or structural defences to deter predators. Mucuna holtonii (Fabaceae) has large seeds containing a toxic amino acid, L-dopa, and covered with a hard seed coat. Our study assessed the effectiveness of chemical and mechanical seed defences a...
Article
Plants frequently display fruit characteristics that support multiple seed-dispersal syndromes. These ambiguous characteristics may reflect the fact that seed dispersal is usually a complex process involving multiple dispersers. This is the case for the Neotropical ginger Renealmia alpinia (Zingiberaceae). It was originally suggested that the aroma...

Citations

... This study was conducted across the contiguous lower 48 states of the U.S.A. (Fig. 1), which extend across a vast latitudinal range (25.17° to 46.07°) and consists of varying elevation and climates resulting in a diverse land cover types and vegetation communities that comprise 10 unique ecoregions that highlight the major ecological areas of the U.S.A. (EPA 2016;Cove et al. 2021). The myriad lands of the U.S.A. support abundant medium to large-sized predators and prey (e.g., > 500 g) commonly captured on camera traps . ...
... The DNA barcodes were then used to identify the diets of beetle species at locations along an altitudinal gradient to model the ecology and evolution of plant-herbivore interactions under the effects of climate change on plant extinctions and the co-extinctions of associated insect herbivores (García-Robledo et al. 2013). For García-Robledo and the members of his research team Terry was considered a very Agra dable collaborator, mentor, and friend ('agradable' means nice in Spanish) (García Robledo 2020; García-Robledo et al. 2020). ...
... Even among these best-known groups, new molecular methods (metabarcoding, Next-Generation Sequencing, etc.) are revealing cryptic and previously undescribed species . These results increase the accuracy of observed numbers but also raise uncertainty of current estimates of species richness, traits, endemism, declines, ecosystem services, and other parameters of biodiversity (Elizalde et al. 2020;García-Robledo et al. 2020;Duffus and Morimoto 2022). ...
... Global warming will seriously affect the physiological homeostasis of a wide variety of animals, especially as temperatures reach species upper thermal tolerance limits (Bozinovic & Pörtner, 2015;Silva et al., 2015;Somero, 2010). These effects are a particular cause for concern in ectotherms such as marine invertebrates (Johnson & Hofmann, 2020;Lefevre, 2016;Stuart-Smith et al., 2015), insects (Sales et al., 2018;Zeuss et al., 2014), fishes (Alfonso et al., 2021;Lema et al., 2016;Weber et al., 2015), amphibians (Rohr & Palmer, 2013;Scheffers et al., 2013;Thurman & Garcia, 2017), and reptiles (Nowakoski et al., 2020;Rodgers et al., 2015;Sinervo et al., 2010) because elevated temperatures not only increase metabolic rate (Garcia-Robledo et al., 2020) but also initiate changes in behavior (Gibert et al., 2016). For example, ectotherms may invest large amounts of time and energy moving between places to maintain their body temperatures within a specific range of temperatures, thereby attempting to optimize physiological processes (Ohlberger, 2013;Rolland et al., 2018). ...
... A range of traits are correlated to body size (i.e., allometry), including the relative dimensions of body parts, as well as physiological and behavioral traits 23 . In arthropods, one such key trait is the amount of fat reserves used for energy storage 19,[24][25][26][27][28][29][30] . Lipids are essential macronutrients for nearly all living organisms, and most animals have the capacity to synthesize and store lipids when resources are abundant 31 . ...
... It is generally considered that large seeds are dispersed further than small ones (Jansen et al., 2002;Yu et al., 2018Yu et al., , 2020, but compared with seed size, seed mass may have a greater effect on seed dispersal distance, and heavier seeds are dispersed further compared with light seeds (Jansen et al., 2004;Xiao et al., 2005a). However, the dispersal distance may be affected by not only seed traits (seed size, seed mass, seed coat thickness, nutritional value, and secondary chemicals) (Kuprewicz & García-Robledo, 2019;Yi et al., 2015) but also the microhabitat (in both the origin and destination) (Perea et al., 2011;Wang & Corlett, 2017) and the number of dispersal movements (Perea et al., 2011). The gap size also has important effects on the seed dispersal of seeds produced by tree species and the success of germination (Van Ulft, 2004;Zhang et al., 2017). ...
... This species is an aggressive colonizer after fire because of its ability to sprout from the root crown and its prolific production of wind-borne seeds [93]. Reproduction through wind-borne seeds is characteristic of large, woody, actinorhizal N-fixing plants, which leads to them being more evenly distributed across the landscape and favoring earlier development in succession [94]. ...
... This advanced temperature controller comes with a 2 × relay for heating-cooling, control functions from − 50 to 90 °C, NTC (10 K) waterproof type thermistors, 0.1 °C measuring, 0.1 °C control accuracy, 220VAC 50HZ Input power, and a 2 × 10A relay output. It can also demonstrate temperature measurements on an LED display and easily adjust its parameters using the SET key [49,50]. F0-F4 codes are customizable parameters that include these items, respectively: temperature set value, difference set value, compressor delay time, and temperature calibration value. ...
... While some studies have found differences in thermal tolerance between diurnal and nocturnal species (Arenas-Moreno et al., 2018;Garcia-Robledo et al., 2018;Gaston, 2019), how daily thermal variation might structure ectotherm physiology remains understudied. Our results here, spanning multiple diurnal and nocturnal lizard species, suggest that the timing of measurements (day vs. night) do not consistently or systematically affect estimates of thermal tolerance. ...
... Predicting the effects of global climate change on species interactions is one of the most pressing challenges for ecologists. Ectotherms are particularly sensitive towards thermal conditions and show severe declines in abundances in respond to climate change 1,20,81 . Whilst the major body of literature focused on rising mean temperatures to date, many studies neglected the increasing frequency of temperature variations and its intricated consequences on biotic interactions. ...