Erin E. Wilson Rankin's research while affiliated with University of California, Riverside and other places

Publications (47)

Article
Pollinator foraging fidelity (i.e., consistent and repeated visitation to a particular plant species or area) is poorly understood for most bee species, but is important information for both the conservation of plant and pollinator species and the ecosystem services they provide to humans. We used plant–pollinator surveys and mark–recapture of flor...
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In human-modified landscapes, understanding how habitat characteristics influence the diversity and composition of beneficial organisms is critical to conservation efforts and modeling ecosystem services. Assessing turnover, or the magnitude of change in species composition across sites or through time, is crucial to said efforts, yet is often over...
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Hummingbirds, a highly diverse avian family, are specialized vertebrate pollinators that feed upon carbohydrate-rich nectar to fuel their fast metabolism while consuming invertebrates to obtain protein. Previous work has found that morphologically diverse hummingbird communities exhibit higher diet specialization on floral resources than morphologi...
Article
The alfalfa leafcutter bee (Megachile rotundata, hereafter simply “leafcutter bee”) is a solitary, cavity‐nesting bee native to Eurasia, managed as an agricultural pollinator of alfalfa and several other crops in North America since the 1940s (Pitts‐Singer and Cane 2011). The most intensively managed and economically valuable solitary bee worldwide...
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Hummingbirds utilize visual cues to locate flowers, but little is known about the role olfaction plays in nectar foraging despite observations that hummingbirds avoid resources occupied by certain insects. We investigated the behavioral responses of both wild and captive hummingbirds to olfactory cues of hymenopteran floral visitors, including nati...
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Invasive species present a worldwide concern as competition and pathogen reservoirs for native species. Specifically, the invasive social wasp, Vespula pensylvanica, is native to western North America and has become naturalized in Hawaii, where it exerts pressures on native arthropod communities as a competitor and predator. As invasive species may...
Article
A key conservation goal in agroecosystems is to understand how management practices may affect beneficial species, such as pollinators. Currently, broad gaps exist in our knowledge as to how horticultural management practices, such as irrigation level, might influence bee reproduction, particularly for solitary bees. Despite the extensive use of or...
Article
1. An ongoing challenge in ecology is predicting how characteristics of communities correspond to habitat features. Examining variation in functional traits across species may reveal patterns not discernible from measures of mere abundance or richness. For beneficial insects like wild bees, functional trait-based approaches are often used to charac...
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Introduced mammalian predators are responsible for the decline and extinction of many native species, with rats (genus Rattus ) being among the most widespread and damaging invaders worldwide. In a naturally fragmented landscape, we demonstrate the multi-year effectiveness of snap traps in the removal of Rattus rattus and Rattus exulans from lava-s...
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Social insect colonies exhibit a variety of life history strategies, from the annual, semelparous colonies of temperate bees and wasps to the long-lived colonies of many ants and honeybees. Species introduced to novel habitats may exhibit plasticity in life history strategies as a result of the introduction, but the factors governing these changes...
Article
Invasive species are a main driver of biodiversity loss and ecological change globally. Consequently, there is a need to understand how invaders damage ecosystems and to develop effective management strategies. Social wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) include some of the world’s most ecologically damaging invasive insects. In recent decades, the invasi...
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Rapid advances in genomic tools for use in ecological contexts and non‐model systems allow unprecedented insight into interactions that occur beyond direct observation. We developed an approach that couples microbial forensics with molecular dietary analysis to identify species interactions and scavenging by invasive rats on native and introduced b...
Article
Insects must detect and respond to diverse chemical cues in a complex chemical landscape. Intraspecific and intraguild communication have received a lot of attention, especially among bee taxa. However, little is known about interspecific chemical communication in general and in non-bees in particular. Ants, such as Formica francoeuri, also are opp...
Article
Bees are economically critical pollinators, but are declining broadly due to several stressors, including nontarget exposure to insecticides and deficiencies in nutrition. Understanding the simultaneous impact of stressors, particularly interactions between them, is critical to effectively conserving bees. Although behavioral effects of pesticides...
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Pollinators provide a key ecosystem service vital for the survival and stability of the biosphere. Identifying factors influencing the plant-pollinator mutualism and pollinator management is necessary for maintaining a healthy ecosystem. Since healthy beehives require substantial amounts of carbohydrates (nectar) and protein (pollen) from forage pl...
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Pollinators such as bees need reliable access to nectar resources. However, competition for these carbohydrate rewards can be high among floral visitors. Moreover, invasive insects may further restrict pollinator access to flowers. For example, invasive Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) are known to harass and displace pollinators from flowers an...
Article
Understanding the spatial and temporal foraging patterns of pollinators is essential to conserving these organisms in human‐modified landscapes, such as agroecosystems (Cranmer et al. 2011). Particularly, understanding foraging fidelity (i.e., returns to a particular plant species or area) is crucial for providing supportive habitats. Numerous appr...
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Flowers may become inoculated with pathogens that can infect bees and other critical pollinators, but the mechanisms of inoculation remain unclear. During foraging, bees may regurgitate or defecate directly onto flower parts, which could inoculate flowers with pollinator pathogens and lead to subsequent disease transmission to floral visitors. We t...
Article
The Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), is a highly invasive ant species that has spread into urban, agricultural, and natural areas worldwide. The pervasive expansion of this species is detrimental both ecologically and economically, resulting in the allocation of vast amounts of resources for control. New efforts are underway to control the...
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Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are a global threat to honeybees, and spillover from managed bees threaten wider insect populations. Deformed wing virus (DWV), a widespread virus that has become emergent in conjunction with the spread of the mite Varroa destructor, is thought to be partly responsible for global colony losses. The arrival of Var...
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In geographic regions with warm winters, invasive yellowjacket wasp colonies (genus Vespula) often exhibit polygyny (multiple queens) and persist for multiple years, despite these phenomena being rare in the native range. Here, we test the hypothesis that polygyny, caused by foreign queens being accepted into an existing colony, is the result of re...
Article
Wild bees provide the essential ecosystem service of pollination, which may be particularly important in island systems that host rare and endangered plants. Identifying and protecting nesting habitat of wild bees is critical for successfully conserving these pollinators and their pollination services, but characterization and delimitation of nesti...
Data
GLMM model averaging results: Kīpuka characteristics and tree height. (PDF)
Data
Mean foraging height of birds by rat treatment and horizontal foraging position. Foraging height was unaffected by horizontal foraging position of the bird within the canopy. Different letters indicate significance at p < 0.01. (PDF)
Data
GLMM model averaging results: Foraging behavior effects on foraging height. (PDF)
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GLMM model averaging results: Proportion of vertical foraging space occupied (canopy utilization by birds). (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Worldwide, native species increasingly contend with the interacting stressors of habitat fragmentation and invasive species, yet their combined effects have rarely been examined. Direct negative effects of invasive omnivores are well documented, but the indirect effects of resource competition or those caused by predator avoidance are unknown. Here...
Data
GLMM model averaging results: Proportion of arthropod biomass per trap. (PDF)
Data
Height of canopy increases with kīpuka size. Canopy heights were averaged over all foraging observations by kīpuka. Data are shown ± SE. Solid black line indicates line of best fit for treated kīpuka and dotted gray for untreated kīpuka. Canopy height increased with kīpuka size and did not differ between treatments. (PDF)
Data
GLMM model averaging results: Foraging heights of Hawaiian forest birds by bird species. (PDF)
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Post-hoc testing for Species (p-value adjustment method: fdr) of model described in Table D. (PDF)
Data
Coqui stomach contents. Total and proportional abundance of invertebrate prey items from stomachs of 12 frogs collected from experimental plots for isotopic analysis. Stomachs contained a mean of 4.5 ± 3.2 SD items. Prey taxa that made up 10% or greater of total stomach contents are highlighted in bold. Amphipoda and Isopoda are predominately litte...
Data
Arthropod composition by habitat type. Composition (in foliage or litter) estimated from foliage clips and Burlese-Tullgren litter extractions collected from the four survey sites on the Island of Hawaii, USA in July 2011. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Invasive predators can profoundly impact native communities, especially in insular ecosystems where functionally equivalent predators were evolutionarily absent. Beyond direct consumption, predators can affect communities indirectly by creating or altering food web linkages among existing species. Where invasive predators consume prey from multiple...
Data
Bayesian mixing model estimates of diet composition for a) foliage and b) litter arthropods based on a trophic enrichment factor of 1.5 per trophic step. Basal sources are naturally occurring forest foliage and experimentally added C4 dried sugarcane leaves as a litter isotopic tracer. Trophic enrichment factors were multiplied by average number of...
Data
Trophic enrichment factor sensitivity analysis. Models run with a range of trophic enrichment factors (TEF) derived from the literature indicate the robustness of diet estimates to applied TEF values. (DOCX)
Article
Social insect colonies are organized by a reproductive division of labor, in which non-reproductive workers cooperate to rear the offspring of the queen. Queen pheromones, chemical compounds produced by queens that regulate worker fertility, have been identified in a handful of bees, ants, wasps, and termites. However, recent studies on bumblebee (...
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Cooperative breeding decreases the direct reproductive output of subordinate individuals, but cooperation can be evolutionarily favored when there are challenges or constraints to breeding independently. Environmental factors, including temperature, precipitation, latitude, high seasonality and environmental harshness have been hypothesized to corr...
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Hummingbirds compete with other floral visitors for access to floral resources (nectar). Several hummingbird species, including Anna’s (Calypte anna), Black-chinned (Archilochus alexandri), Allen’s (Selasphorus sasin), and Costa’s (Calypte costae) hummingbirds, make extensive use of non-native plants of urban areas of Southern California. Exploitat...
Article
Mutualisms contribute in fundamental ways to the origin, maintenance and organization of biological diversity. Introduced species commonly participate in mutualisms, but how this phenomenon affects patterns of interactions among native mutualists remains incompletely understood. Here we examine how networks of interactions among aphid-tending ants,...
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Full-text available
Animals often increase their fitness by moving across space in response to temporal variation in habitat quality and resource availability, and as a result of intra and inter-specific interactions. The long-term persistence of populations and even whole species depends on the collective patterns of individual movements, yet animal movements have be...
Data
Animals often increase their fitness by moving across space in response to temporal variation in habitat quality and resource availability, and as a result of intra and inter-specific interactions. The long-term persistence of populations and even whole species depends on the collective patterns of individual movements, yet animal movements have be...
Article
Pollinators require resources throughout the year to maintain healthy populations. Along the urban–natural interface, floral resource availability may be limited especially when the system experiences extreme drought and fire threats. In such areas, succulents, such as Aloe spp., are commonly planted to serve as functional drought-tolerant, fire-pr...
Conference Paper
The popular managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) provides pollination services in agricultural systems during crop bloom, However, when crops are not in bloom, these bees must sustain themselves and support their diet with floral resources from the natural and semi-natural environment. In Southern California, floral resources are typically limited in...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods The popular managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) provides vital pollination services in agricultural systems. However, when crops are not in bloom, these bees must sustain themselves and supplement their diet with floral resources from the natural and semi-natural environment. In Southern California, floral resources are...

Citations

... However, the diets of species with different foraging strategies have been shown to converge in times of high food supply, such as abundant ants for overwintering migrants (Kent and Sherry 2020), or seasonally emergent aquatic insects in riparian habitats (Trevelline et al. 2018). Similarly, 3 sympatric hummingbird species in California demonstrate broadly overlapping diets with limited evidence for dietary niche partitioning (Spence et al. 2021). Our samples primarily came from burned forests in Washington and California, where abundant fire-killed trees produce a resource pulse of deadwood-associated insects (Costello et al. 2011, Ray et al. 2019. ...
... A six-year survey of bee foraging in California urban environments found that native plants support bee taxa that do not interact with introduced plants [21]. Nurseries who grow native plants exhibit more specialized bee species and fewer generalist pollinator species [22]. Supporting evidence by Zaninotto et al. [23] found that exotic pests had more generalist pollinator interactions but were less attractive to diverse pollinators. ...
... As around this bee rearing station there are fields for intensive agricultural production, there is also the possibility for chemical contamination of different nest materials, pollen and nectar, as well as mud, water and leaf nest material. Additionally, residues of agrochemicals or fer-tilizers used in plant cultivar production, natural vegetation and soil can be detected [38,39]. Again, as at L1, these results indicate the possibility that bee females avoid laying eggs on contaminated or changed bacterial community composition of pollen provisions. ...
... Biotic factors may be as important as abiotic ones, but this topic has been only rarely investigated. Food availability and quality prior to overwintering was previously identified as an important factor determining overwintering success [6,12], and the potential role of predators, parasites and pathogens has been proposed [13][14][15][16]. ...
... (Vespula spp.), particularly in their introduced ranges (Lester and Beggs 2019, Wilson-Rankin 2021). Despite the interest, large gaps in our knowledge exist with regard to basic natural history and biology, especially in the native ranges of these wasps. ...
... Given that the true frequency of tortoise consumption may be higher than previously reported, it will also be important for future studies to investigate whether tortoise consumption is a result of predation or scavenging on carcasses of tortoises killed by disease, drought, road mortality, or other causes (Boarman, 2002). Recent research has shown that it is possible to determine whether consumption occurred on live or dead animals using bacterial biomarkers associated with tissue decay (Muletz-Wolz et al., 2021). Using a similar method could help determine if, for example, multiple predators are feeding on a single carcass, and allow for a more accurate count of the number of tortoise mortality events that are caused by canids and ravens. ...
... The stress-induced increased emission rate of VOCs with a defensive primary function (rather than pollinator attraction) could deter pollinators (Theis, 2006;Schiestl et al., 2014). Avoiding drought-stressed plants based on floral scent signals may be positively selected, or based on associative learning (Jaworski et al., 2015), if altered floral scent is a cue for reduced quality or quantity of floral resources (Wilson Rankin et al., 2020). ...
... In general, granular formulations are understudied relative to seed and foliar applications [43]. Furthermore, field studies on neonicotinoids and ALCBs are surprisingly uncommon relative to laboratory exposure trials [44][45][46][47]. Field enclosure experiments with closely related solitary bees (Osmia) and neonicotinoid-treated crops, albeit using different application methods, found varying effects on bee reproduction [48,49]. ...
... Understanding pollinator foraging fidelity (i.e., returns to a particular plant species or area) is crucial for conserving these species and the ecosystem services they provide in the face of anthropogenic impacts to their habitats. Mark-recapture methods permit studying the short-term foraging fidelity of these species (Ogilvie and Thomson 2016;Cecala and Wilson Rankin 2020). Surprisingly, despite the nearly worldwide ubiquity and pollination importance of the western honeybee (Apis mellifera Linnaeus), we could find no mark-recapture studies of the foraging fidelity of this species. ...