Erik Hannerz's research while affiliated with Lund University and other places

Publications (6)

Article
Much of today’s public discourse on crime cases take place on online platforms, as long chains of high-speed posts: speculations, analyses, and laments, as well as ironic, sarcastic, and derogatory comments. These give excellent (and yet risky) possibilities to engage in homemade investigation, with other posters as instant reviewers and audiences....
Article
Drawing from interviews with posters and an analysis of a dozen discussion threads on the Swedish online discussion forum Flashback, this article sets out to investigate the dramatization of crime news from the point of view of the participants themselves. Analyzing both the online discussions and the articulated motivations and activities of the p...
Article
During the last 10 years, the mobile phone and the emergence of websites, such as Youtube, which facilitate user-generated content, have enabled an explosion of pictures and video clips posted on the internet by civilians documenting the activities of authority figures. This “sousveillance” is a kind of inverse surveillance, reciprocal to surveilla...
Article
Full-text available
This paper calls for renewed consideration of the way research subjects are selected in the study of subcultures. All too often, subcultural researchers limit themselves to the use of one or two of the orthodox sampling designs, such as ‘convenience sampling’ (selecting subjects who are readily available) or ‘chain referral sampling’ (selecting a r...
Article
Drawing from extensive fieldwork among graffiti writers in Sweden this article investigates gendered identity work and its consequences. It points to how potentially inclusive aspects of disembodied subcultural Performances-that identities are negotiated through the material representation of the writer rather than on basis of the physical body-nev...
Article
Full-text available
http://journal.media-culture.org.au/index.php/mcjournal/article/viewArticle/912

Citations

... heavy drug abusers) and high-status groups (e.g. successful dealers), and it also happened that individuals took the initiative to introduce themselves or a friend and propose an interview (Hannerz and Tutenges 2021). While in the field, notes on observations and interactions were continuously written down. ...
... Graffiti and street art practices may be understood as embodied experiences where both scholars and research participants are part of the embodied process, accumulating fieldrelevant knowledge. Some graffiti and street art researchers have considered how their creators' agency, identities, cultures, bodies, thoughts and emotions are embodied in artefacts (Hannerz, 2017;Schacter, 2014). Other researchers have emphasised the joint mind-body actions in generating and perceiving graffiti and street art products through embodied experiences (Myllylä, 2018;Halsey and Young, 2006;Nomeikaite, 2017). ...
... Much research on contemporary tiny houses focuses on tiny houses on wheels (THOW) and is preoccupied typically with dwelling types and how they are recognized in local government planning schemes (eg Evans, 2018b;Mingoya, 2015;Saxton, 2019). This article considers also those who live or aspire to live in tiny houses and like Colombini (2019), we focus on the counter-cultural or subcultural elements of tiny house living, where counter-cultural refers to 'a set of values and norms significantly different from and often in direct contrast with the dominant norms and values that prevail today' (Williams & Hannerz, 2014;Yinger, 1982, p. 15) and subcultural refers to the lifestyles of less explicitly oppositional but nevertheless unconventional social groups (Yinger, 1960). In doing so, it also reframes the discourse away from the complexities of defining the dwelling per se, and onto the characteristics of tiny house dwellers and supporters, what they advocate and whether this can be said to constitute a new social movement. ...