Erik E. Filsinger's research while affiliated with University of Alabama and other places

Publications (11)

Chapter
An explosion of thinking and research on biosocial perspectives on the family has occurred in recent years.1 Three major developments have contributed: advances in evolutionary thinking, findings of proximate biological interplay with social and psychological forces, and changes in the field of family studies.2 One aspect of a biosocial perspective...
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Additional analyses of ratings by 98 male and 102 female college students assigned to one of four odor conditions showed no significant correlations for the methyl anthranilate or skatole odor conditions, but the pattern of correlations for men and women was different in the alpha androstenone condition, e.g., if men found alpha androstenone pleasa...
Article
Additional analyses of ratings by 98 male and 102 female college students assigned to one of four odor conditions showed no significant correlations for the methyl anthranilate or skatole odor conditions, but the pattern of correlations for men and women was different in the alpha androstenone condition, e.g., if men found alpha androstenone pleasa...
Article
Full-text available
Young children (ages 2 to 5) have proved to be difficult subjects for obtaining valid reports of their ratings of olfactory stimuli. Thirty-six preschoolers were tested on benzaldehyde (a pleasant odor) and on dimethyl disulfide (an unpleasant odor) using a smiling or frowning face as a response format. The results showed the ability of young child...
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195 Ss (mean age 20.6 yrs) completed an introversion–extraversion scale and rated strength, familiarity, and pleasantness of 4 odors. Data indicate that the introversion–extraversion items formed a factor separate from 3 olfactory factors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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This research compared the relative contributions of odor and visual cues in determining young children’s preferences. Thirty-two children were assigned randomly to one of four groups that differed in the order in which odorants and colors were presented. The children were tested in two sessions which differed in terms of the odorant concentrations...
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Recent research suggests possible pheromonal effects of alpha androstenone and alpha androstenol, two steroids secreted by human apocrine glands. Using a paradigm of rating self and pictures of a target male and female in the presence of an odor, potential effects of the putative pheromones and a synthetic musk were examined. Significant multivaria...
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Recent evidence suggests that human odor communication may have particular relevance for family scholars. This paper examines the role of odor communication in kin recognition, parental attachment, mate selection, and procreation. Evidence for odor communication in each of these areas is critically presented. Weaknesses in the current literature ar...
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Previous studies have suggested that the pig sex pheromone 5 alpha-androst-16-en-3-one may function as a human sex pheromone. Two hundred male and female college students were assigned to one of four odor conditions (androstenone, methyl anthranilate, skatole, and a no-odor control) and were asked to rate photographs of a male stimulus and to rate...

Citations

... Olfaction plays a central role in wildlife adaptation, representing the most important and crucial sense for most mammals through a complex pathway starting in the olfactory epithelium . The relevance of olfaction during searching for food and intraspecific communication has been extensively investigated (Filsinger and Fabes, 1985;Rinaldi, 2007). Furthermore, even before birth, maternal amniotic odor can stimulate the fetus, particularly in kin recognition (Schaal and Orgeur, 1992), but the exact mechanism has not yet been elucidated. ...
... There are also many reports on the influence of the menstrual cycle on odour perception [11], but the results are inconsistent [12]. Amoore [13], Filsinger & Monte [14], and Hummel et al. [15] found no differences in olfactory perception during the menstrual cycle. At the same time, numerous studies arrived at an opposite conclu sion, but the observed differences were heteroge neous. ...
... Shyness has also been linked to olfactory perceptual thresholds (Herbener et al., 1989), with extremely shy males having significantly lower olfactory thresholds (meaning that they are more sensitive to smells). By contrast, introversion-extraversion is not a strong predictor of olfactory performance (Chen and Dalton, 2005;Filsinger et al., 1987;Koelega, 1970Koelega, , 1994Larsson et al., 2000), 17 with Pause et al. (1998) reporting that neuroticism was a stronger predictor for olfactory sensitivity than extraversion. ...
... Hill describes C as how the family defines the event or stressor, which we conceptualize as the spiritual component (Wright et al., 1996) of the BPSS model. B: psychosocial needs and resources Troost and Filsinger (1993) discussed the important idea that biology and biosocial variables are not determinant of the family situation but instead provide a set of possibilities and opportunities, as well as limitations and constraints for families. After their child is diagnosed with a chronic illness, there is not one model for parents to follow; however, there may be particular limitations imposed on the family as well as some new possibilities created. ...
... The effect was strongest for ratings of photographs of women. Filsinger, Braun, and Monte (1985) asked participants to sniff a bag containing either an androstenol solution or one of three other solutions. Following this, they read descriptions of a fictional male character and a fictional female character presented along with photographs supposedly of the individuals described. ...
... (i.e., evidence of genocide against conquered peoples). The most profound examples come from history: the destruction of Jericho by Judas, the destruction of Phoenician Tyre by the Greco-Macedonians, the destruction of Phoenician Carthage (Latin: Carthago or Karthago, Ancient Greek: Καρχηδών Karkhēdōn) by Romans, the genocide of Armenians by Turks during World War I (WWI; physically), the genocide of the Jewish people by Germans during WWII (physical and chemical killing, and sterilization by X-ray, chemicals, and other means), the genocide of the native population of Cambodia by the Khmer-Rouge (by all means a primitive physical destruction), the genocide in Rwanda of Tutsis and moderate Hutus by members of the Hutu majority (physically), etc. Human social behavior is somewhat also regulated by odors (pheromones) [87] [88]. ...
... One possible explanation for this lack of olfactory identification in Group I may be related to the fact that such an ability is significantly correlated with the level of cognitive functions (Hedner et al. 2010), including difficulties in task comprehension and low concentration abilities (Guinard 2001). In particular, the limited span of attention may interfere with testing procedures (Strickland et al. 1988), given that visual selective attention abilities develop at about 5 to 6 years of age (for a review, see Garon et al. 2008). Indeed, one might argue that children aged below 5 years (i.e., belonging to Group I) may not be able to identify the correct picture among four images because the visual scanning task is too complex for their age (Fabes and Filsinger 1986) and attention to the target is degraded by the presence of surrounding objects (Casco et al. 1998). ...
... In particular, the limited span of attention may interfere with testing procedures (Strickland et al. 1988), given that visual selective attention abilities develop at about 5 to 6 years of age (for a review, see Garon et al. 2008). Indeed, one might argue that children aged below 5 years (i.e., belonging to Group I) may not be able to identify the correct picture among four images because the visual scanning task is too complex for their age (Fabes and Filsinger 1986) and attention to the target is degraded by the presence of surrounding objects (Casco et al. 1998). However, this seems unlikely, given that numerous cognitive and language assessment tools include tasks that require correct response selection from a field of four choices (e.g., Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test: Dunn and Dunn 2007; Wechsler Preschool Primary Scale of Intelligence: Wechsler 1967). ...
... We do not wish to make too much of these correlations but, clearly, they raise the possibility that how pleasant or intense a substance is perceived to be may, at least in part, determine the psychological effects that substance produces. The point we wish to make here is simply that studies of the effect of odours should take account of possible indirect effects of the hedonic value of the substance(s) used (see Filsinger, Braun, Monte, & Linder, 1984;Kirk-Smith & Booth, 1987;McCollough et al., 1981) before attributing any so-called pheromonal effect directl to the properties of the substance itself. ...