Eric Brandstedt's research while affiliated with Lund University and other places

Publications (19)

Article
Full-text available
This is a review of contemporary philosophical discussions of population policies. The focus is on normative justification, and the main question is whether population policies can be ethically justified. Although few analytical philosophers have directly addressed this question – it has been discussed more in other academic fields – many arguments...
Article
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Many normative theorists want to contribute to making the world a better place. In recent years, it has been suggested that to realise this ambition one must start with an adequate description of real-life practices. To determine what should be done, however, one must also fundamentally criticise existing moral beliefs. The method of reflective equ...
Article
A challenge for the theorising of climate justice is that even when the agents whose actions are supposed to be regulated are cooperative and act in good faith, they may still disagree about how the burdens and benefits of dealing with climate change should be distributed. This article is a contribution to the formulation of a useful role for norma...
Article
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Wynes and Nicholas (2017) argue that the most effective action to reduce individual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is to have one fewer child. We raise methodological concerns about the way in which the authors attribute responsibility for emissions: they rely on multiple counting when calculating the emissions of future generations, and they exclu...
Article
Based on three recently published books on climate justice, this article reviews the field of climate ethics in light of developments of international climate politics. The central problem addressed is how idealised normative theories can be relevant to the political process of negotiating a just distribution of the costs and benefits of mitigating...
Article
The common conception of justice as reciprocity seemingly is inapplicable to relations between non-overlapping generations. This is a challenge also to John Rawls’s theory of justice as fairness. This text responds to this by way of reinterpreting and developing Rawls’s theory. First, by examining the original position as a model, some revisions of...
Book
Welfare is commonly conceptualized in socio-economic terms of equity, highlighting distributive issues within growing economies. While GDP, income growth and rising material standards of living are normally not questioned as priorities in welfare theories and policy making, there is growing evidence that Western welfare standards are not generaliza...
Article
Some key political challenges today, e.g. climate change, are future oriented. The intergenerational setting differs in some notable ways from the intragenerational one, creating obstacles to theorizing about intergenerational justice. One concern is that as the circumstances of justice do not pertain intergenerationally, intergenerational justice...
Article
Full-text available
Scholars have argued that we have compelling reasons to combat climate change beacuse it threatens human rights, referred here to as 'climate rights'. The prospects of climate rights are analysed assuming two basic desiderata: the accuracy of the concept in caputing the normative dimension of climate change (reasons to prevent/mitigate/adapt to cli...
Article
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The concept of the Anthropocene conveys a radical novelty: humans have become a 'geological actor' and are able to influence and affect the biosphere to an extent unprecedented in history. This new state of affairs poses intertwined challenges to ecological, technological, political and normative systems. It also raises hard ques-tions about knowle...

Citations

... Sin embargo, la bibliografía académica más reconocida describiría un estado de la cuestión efervescente en explicaciones muy diversas y muchas veces alternativas que, sin embargo, son complementarias para profundizar en fenómenos así de complejos. Conforme más se avanza más se recurre a lo interdisciplinar 2 (con todas las áreas de conocimiento social entrando en juego: geografía, antropología, sociología, psicología, política, economía, derecho) para explicar interdependencias, dando importancia a los contextos, y obteniendo conclusiones con mucho margen interpretativo según los supuestos de partida (Andersson et al., 2021). Esta ausencia de modelos generales y unas investigaciones muy matizadas no invalida su rigor, ni sería señal de debilidad intelectual, al contrario. ...
... The sustainable welfare issue in public policy has greatly attracted scholars and government officials. Critics encourage traditional welfare countries that previously focused on economic welfare to pursue sustainable welfare (Brandstedt and Emmelin, 2017) that incorporates economic, social and environmental welfare. The emergence of sustainable development goals (SDGs) in 2015 emphasizes the importance of sustainable welfare. ...
... In contrast, others shrink and disappear, which generates social and economic costs and losses to groups of people and countries with the potential to slow down GDP growth. Thus, a just and equitable transition to a global low-carbon economy faces difficulties [145]. No transition is not just, e.g., since impacts are already damaging vulnerable countries (see next Section 2.3.7). ...
... Inadvertently, individuals may be responsible for the emissions of their descendants (O'Neill & Wexler, 2000;Satterthwaite, 2009;Van Basshuysen & Brandstedt, 2018), and reproductive decisions have environmental implications that span generations (Andrijevic & Striessnig, 2017). Wynes and Nicholas (2017) calculated that having one fewer child would lead to an average of 58.6 tonnes CO 2 -equivalent (tCO 2 e) annual emission reductions for a person living in a developed country, which is more impactful in terms of emissions reductions than any other studied activity (e.g., living car-free, avoiding airplane travel). ...
... The results can help the government to formulate more accurate and feasible building emission reduction strategies and responsibility sharing. There are two recognized patterns of "responsibility allocation" related to climate justice (Brandstedt and Brülde 2019), including the "burden sharing justice" and "harm avoidance justice." "Burden sharing justice" refers to the issue of allocation that has formed under the threat of climate change. ...
... The urgency of climate change and the inadequacy of the global response has led some to ask, 'why are we waiting?' (Stern, 2015). Part of the answer may lie in the inadequacy of the tools most commonly used to guide decision-making processes (Farmer et al., 2015;Mercure et al., 2016). ...
... To meet the practical aim set by Rawlsian constructivism, a process of justification stops at a partial reflective equilibrium, i.e. a systematic organisation of a subset of all moral judgments. This should not prevent one from then continuing the process of justification and seek to systematise different domains of practice or even the whole moral landscape, but these are not the ambitions of Rawlsian constructivism (see also Brännmark and Brandstedt 2019). ...
... Some people have challenged the validity of this calculation. They claim that it would count the same emissions multiple times: attributing responsibility to the individual and their parent and their grandparents etc. 42 This is a misunderstanding, however, since we are referring to emissions reductions, not emissions. If an emissions reduction is attributed to the parent for deciding not to have a child, there is no child in the next generation to attribute the missing emissions to, so no double counting. ...
... The theme of climate justice is seen as vital to the debate on the impacts of climate change on individuals, since it combines academic, activism and social justice aspects (Brandstedt, 2019;Meikle et al., 2016). Since then, the scientific literature has become interested in the topic, one which addresses complex moral and ethical issues (Sovacool, 2013). ...
... These movements tend to stimulate public debate and reaction, plausi-715 bly contributing to speed up global mitigation. Faced with the increasing evidence that 716 climate politics is "difficult, problematic, or perhaps wicked" [177], climate ethicists have 717 tried to be more practical and seek pragmatic ways to bring individual people and even-718 tually society closer to the normative ethical ideals. This emergent approach, called non-719 ideal theory, specifically addresses the question of realism, which implies starting from 720 an accurate description of people, politics and policies, transitional processes, concerns, 721 and ways to deal with non-compliers [178]. ...