Enespa's research while affiliated with University of Lucknow and other places

Publications (11)

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Full-text available
Aflatoxins (AFTs) are group of secondary metabolites produced by filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus, A. nomius, and Emericella nidulans. AFTs contaminate foods, feeds, other raw ingredients used to produce them and that pose a significant threat to human health. These toxins designated as aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2...
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In real polluted soils a wide variety of recalcitrant pollutants with several chemical white-rot fungi such as Pleurotus ostreatus, Irpex lacteus, Trametes versicolor, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Lentinus edodes, Coriolus versicolor, Cyathus stercoreus, Heterobasidion annosum, and Ceriporiopsis subvermispora degrade the cell wall components simult...
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The versatility of plant growth–promoting fungi (PGPF) and their association with plants have been confirmed as enormously valuable to plants in saline stress. Fungal genera such as Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Piriformospora, Phoma, and Trichoderma are the most frequently reported PGPF used in situations of abiotic stress. PGPF–plant intera...
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Rhizomicrobiome improves abiotic stress tolerance in plants and promote their improvement. These plant growth-promoting microbiomes stimulate the growth of the plants by diverse mechanisms. These microorganisms help the plants in acquisition of unavailable nutrients such as phosphorus, zinc, and potassium and produce siderophores and different phyt...
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Full-text available
The presence of organic matter on artistic stonework can be credited to inadequate historical renovations, lysis of microbial cells, primary surface colonization, and manifestation of hydrocarbons from oil combustion. The conservation of the artwork itself can be seriously dangerous. To date, surfactants and solubilizing agents have been used to re...
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Salinity of the agriculture soil is the serious issue all over the world, and it is also an important environmental factor for reduction of growth and yield of agricultural crops. The density of more salt available in soil may alter the physiological and metabolic activities in the agricultural crops and reduce the growth and production of crops bo...
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A wetland ecosystem is an important reservoir of microbial diversity and contributes significantly in mitigation of the Greenhouse gas emissions. Increased nitrogen (N) inputs from agriculture and fossil fuel combustion have been recognized as a severe threat to biodiversity loss and ecosystem functioning of wetlands, such as control of greenhouse...
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In interactions between plants and soil, microorganisms have significant roles. Ecological stability is contributed by the biogeochemical cycling of elements. An emerging body of research is distinguishing the impacts that root-associated microbial communities can have on plant fitness and growth. Rocks and minerals are weathered by the activities...
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Natural products are important not only in the environment but also as useful compounds in various applications as in medicine or as phytopathogens. An enormous number of such compounds have been derived from fungal communities colonizing various habitats. Traditionally, the isolates of a fungal community have been explored as “biofactories” of nov...

Citations

... The plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPFs) can influence germination, seedling vigor, shoot growth, root growth, photosynthetic efficiency, flowering, and yield (López-Bucio et al., 2015;Hossain and Sultana, 2020b). Moreover, previous studies have revealed that PGPFs also improve systemic tolerance of abiotic stress in various crop plants (Khan et al., 2011;Zhang et al., 2016;Chandra and Singh, 2020). PGPFs include species of the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, Trichoderma, Penicillium, Piriformospora, Phoma, and Rhizoctonia (Hossain et al., 2007Shoresh et al., 2010). ...
... Phlebia brevispora white-rot fungus tarnished TeCBp, PeCBp, and HCBp congeners to methoxylated intermediates and para-dechlorinated methoxylated intermediates (Covino et al. 2016;Li et al. 2018). The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger degraded a PCB technical mixture (Chlophen A) and is also reported (Al-Hawash et al. 2019;Enespa et al. 2020a). Only the mixture with the lowest total chlorine content was biodegradably tested from the three Chlophen mixtures (A30, A50, and A60 of 42, 54, and 60% chlorine content, respectively) (Marco-Urrea et al. 2015;Jesus et al. 2016;Smułek et al. 2019). ...
... Likewise, the success of genetic engineering is limited only to the controlled lab environment, and their field trials are still in their infancy (Saghafi, Delangiz, Lajayer, & Ghorbanpour et al., 2019). Thus, methods which can have long-lasting impact improve the soil fertility, enhance microbial populations, and can also provide high crop yield at high salt concentrations as desired (Prakash & Chandra, 2020). Therefore, the use of microorganisms that are capable of forming biofilms and producing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provide an alternative sustainable solution for alleviating salt stress. ...
... In terrestrial ecosystems, plants interact with a myriad of soil microbial communities that lead to the establishment of interdependent relationships [1], which drive plant community productivity [2], belowground biodiversity, and ecosystem multifunctionality [3][4][5]. These interactions are crucial for many aspects [6,7], including the nutrient acquisition of plants from heterogeneously distributed microsites. The responses of plants to spatially, heterogeneously distribute soil nutrients require a specialized physiological strategy commonly referred to as the root foraging mechanism, i.e., the proliferation of roots in nutrient-rich microhabitats [8,9] and microbially mediated mechanisms via a plantmicrobe symbiotic relationship to ensure the effective acquisition of soil nutrients [10]. ...
... Prior research has well documented the effects of land use and agricultural management practices on wetlands from the perspective of regional hydrology, biogeochemical cycling, plant and animal communities (Boughton, et al., 2016;DeLucia et al., 2019;Ho et al., 2018;Jansen et al., 2019;Marty, 2005;Upadhyay et al., 2019a;Upadhyay et al., 2019b). Nevertheless, it remains less clear on how those anthropogenic activities could interactively alter wetland microbial communities, which control the majority of biological processes in soils, regulate biogeochemical cycling of carbon and key nutrients, and thus play vital roles in climate mitigation, pollution removal, and overall stability of wetlands (Chandra et al., 2020;Upadhyay et al., 2019b). In particular, very little work has examined how multiple anthropogenic drivers, including land-use intensification, grazing and fire disturbances, could affect wetland microbial communities, and whether there are any interactions (e.g., synergistic or antagonistic) among these drivers. ...
... The wide adaptability of fungi to survive in different environmental conditions is generally recognized as a consequence of the huge and versatile repertoire of secondary metabolites (SMs) they can produce. Even if not indispensable for their survival, SMs give an important contribution to fungal lifestyles being actively involved in the interactions established with the environment as well as with other organisms (Singh and Chandra 2019;Sarrocco 2016). These compounds, whose production is highly susceptible to the environment, can help to guarantee the adaptation to local changes by triggering reproduction, conidia differentiation, or production of virulence factors (Mahmood et al. 2010) as well as the defense of the territory. ...