Emily Rubidge's research while affiliated with University of British Columbia - Vancouver and other places

Publications (15)

Article
Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) are a large-bodied species of flatfish that are important culturally, economically, and as a key predator in marine systems in the USA and Canada. The species has a wide distribution, and complex life history including large-scale migrations to spawn and feed, making it potentially susceptible to climate ch...
Article
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Conservation of marine biodiversity requires understanding the joint influence of ongoing environmental change and fishing pressure. Addressing this challenge requires robust biodiversity monitoring and analyses that jointly account for potential drivers of change. Here, we ask how demersal fish biodiversity in Canadian Pacific waters has changed s...
Preprint
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Projections of how climate change will impact marine species and communities are urgently needed to inform management measures aimed at stemming biodiversity loss. In the coming decades, warming and deoxygenation of marine waters are anticipated to result in shifts in the distribution and abundance of fishes, with consequences for the diversity and...
Article
Predictions of the distribution of groundfish species are needed to support ongoing marine spatial planning initiatives in Canadian Pacific waters. Data to inform species distribution models are available from several fisheries-independent surveys. However, no single survey covers the entire region and different gear types are required to survey th...
Article
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To protect cold-water corals and sponges from fishing damage, management changes were made in 2012 to the groundfish bottom trawl fishery British Columbia, Canada. The Groundfish Trawl Habitat Agreement restricted the spatial footprint of the fishery and introduced a cold-water coral and sponge bycatch quota, which was among the world’s first. Usin...
Article
Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) have been adopted globally as a tool to combat biodiversity loss and restore marine ecosystems. Successful application of MPAs will be predicated on the ability to monitor biodiversity in a synoptic and non-invasive manner. Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods have important advantages over traditional biodiversity survey...
Article
Marine protected areas (MPAs) are important conservation tools for safeguarding marine systems, yet they are increasingly impacted by climate change. Connectivity is a fundamental aspect of MPA design and evaluation, but regional patterns of marine ecological connectivity are often not well understood, nor how connectivity patterns may be affected...
Article
Full-text available
The dispersal of marine organisms is a critical process for the maintenance of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning across a seascape. Understanding the patterns of habitat connectivity that arise from the movement of multiple species can highlight the role of regional processes in maintaining local community structure. However, quantifying the p...
Article
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Seagrass meadows are among the most productive and diverse marine ecosystems, providing essential structure, functions, and services. They are also among the most impacted by human activities and in urgent need of better management and protection. In Canada, eelgrass ( Zostera marina) meadows are found along the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic coasts...
Technical Report
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Canada has committed to developing effective and representative marine conservation networks. Guidance for the development of these networks focuses on core design features, including the incorporation of ecologically and biologically significant areas, ecological representation, replication, connectivity, and adequacy/viability. Network planning u...
Article
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• The global extent of marine protected areas (MPAs) has increased rapidly in the last decade, and monitoring and evaluation are now required for effective and adaptive management of these areas. • We classify monitoring in MPAs into four categories and identify a critically important, but undervalued category: human pressure monitoring that target...
Article
Full-text available
The quantification of kelp forest distribution across space and time is critical to support decision-makers responsible for habitat management and conservation. Spatial data such as aerial photos and satellite imagery are key for deriving kelp distribution; however, they have only become available at an adequate quality within the 20th and 21st cen...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Canada is committed to maintaining biological diversity and productivity in the marine environment under the Oceans Act (Government of Canada 1997). Identifying Ecologically and Biologically Significant Areas (EBSAs) is a key component of this commitment. Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) have developed gui...

Citations

... Ocean warming and deoxygenation are already modifying habitat availability for many aerobic organisms, with significant impacts on their distribution over space and time (Cheung et al., 2009;Keeling et al., 2010;Seibel, 2011). A number of studies have analyzed the response of marine species distributions and ecosystem structure to increasing temperature (Campana et al., 2020;Christian & Holmes, 2016;McLean et al., 2018;Perry et al., 2005;Sunday et al., 2015), but less work has considered the impact of concurrent warming and deoxygenation in driving habitat reduction (Bianucci et al., 2015;Deutsch et al., 2015;Thompson et al., 2022). ...
... A growing area of omics application and research is eDNA metabarcoding, which has revolutionized biomonitoring in aquatic ecosystems through detection of invasive and/or rare species (Weltz et al., 2017;Matejusova et al., 2021) and the characterization of community-level biodiversity (Bani et al., 2020;Djurhuus et al., 2020). This method involves the collection of extracellular DNA from aquatic samples and is often more taxonomically and monetarily efficient than traditional monitoring approaches (Fediajevaite et al., 2021;He et al., 2022). eDNA collection is minimally invasive and can be implemented in various environments and conditions, and thus represents a useful tool for MPA monitoring (Sawaya et al., 2019;Gold et al., 2021). ...
... Finally, although our work dealt with the coastal oceans of BC and SEA, the same methodological approach could be applied to allow a more precise regionalization of other coastal oceans, aiding the interpretation of oceanic processes and, specifically, phytoplankton dynamics and productivity. Considering rapid climate change and its predicted impact on marine biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (Ainsworth et al., 2011;Cheung et al., 2021;Friesen et al., 2021), yet limited resources for in situ observation, there is an urgent need for both alternative observation strategies and optimization of existing observation programs through the establishment of representative monitoring regions. Ocean-surface partitioning using remotely sensed data presents a valuable tool to address this task. ...
... Short-term marine heat waves, which are becoming more common as a result of climate change (Oliver et al 2019), can cause local or widespread seagrass die-offs (e.g. Smale et al 2019, Strydom et al 2020, Murphy et al 2021. The loss of seagrasses can lead to the loss of associated carbon stocks (Arias-Ortiz et al 2018). ...
... An increasing number of studies has measured the performance of ecological, economic and social aspects of MPAs to move forward our understanding on success and failures to guide policy and management strategies (Gill et al., 2017;Giakoumi et al., 2018;Pendleton et al., 2018;Ban et al., 2019;Mizrahi et al., 2019). Understanding the magnitude and occurrence of human pressures and their ecological effects/implications is critical for assessing and monitoring MPAs effectiveness (Zupan et al., 2018;Dunham et al., 2020). ...
... Borja et al. 2006b. Due to the role of Pollicipes as habitat-forming species, qualitative or quantitative information on abundance has also been important for the conservation of priority areas (Rubidge et al. 2020, Neves 2021. ...
... This is especially true for navigational charts that pay special attention to the location and extent of marine hazards, including coral reefs, and shoreline features, like mangrove forests. Historical charts have been used to show changes in reef coverage in the Florida Keys over a 240-year period (McClenachan et al., 2017), kelp forests in British Columbia for nearly a century (Costa et al., 2020), and maps have been merged with aerial photography to chronicle changes in California oak savannahs for over a century (Whipple et al., 2011). Navigational charts in the South Pacific, created by Europeans and Americans, provide opportunities to explore ecosystem changes in places lacking other published records. ...