Emily M O'Donnell's research while affiliated with Harvard Medical School and other places

Publications (6)

Article
Objective: Work and family stressors may be associated with elevated cardiovascular risk factors. Methods: To assess the effects of work-to-family conflict (WTFC) on biomarkers of cardiometabolic risk, we examined 1524 extended care employees over 18 months and estimated multilevel linear models that accounted for the nested nature of the data. Res...
Article
Full-text available
PurposeMost research on the work conditions and family responsibilities associated with work-family conflict and other measures of mental health uses the individual employee as the unit of analysis. We argue that work conditions are both individual psychosocial assessments and objective characteristics of the proximal work environment, necessitatin...
Chapter
Social and economic policies designed to improve working conditions and employee well-being in adulthood have often resulted in the unintentional improvement of the health of children and their parents. Unfortunately, the USA is behind in implementing such policies and is losing ground in the health of its families compared to most other industrial...
Article
To examine the relation between having a child aged 18 years and under in the home and employee depressive symptoms, we analyzed cross-sectional data from four extended care facilities in Boston, MA (n = 376 employees). Results show that having a child is associated with slightly higher depressive symptoms. The strength of this relationship in our...
Article
Full-text available
As interventions increasingly emphasize early child care settings, it is necessary to understand the state regulatory context that provides guidelines for outdoor physical activity and safety and sets standards for child care environments. Researchers reviewed regulations for child care facilities for 50 states, the District of Columbia and the Vir...
Article
Full-text available
Social support resources are thought to buffer stressful life events and have been associated with numerous health outcomes in industrialized countries. Because the nature of supportive relationships varies by culture and social class, we studied the relationship of informal social support and networks to self-rated health among low-income women in...

Citations

... [8][9][10] Such organizational and psychosocial stressors have been linked to cardiovascular disease risks related to blood pressure, hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome, and depression. 11 Effective science-based policies and programs exist that can help improve health and well-being, [12][13][14] and there is evidence that comprehensive strategies may be more effective than siloed programs. 15 Every business impacts its workers' health and wellbeing. ...
... Professional groups, family researchers, and organizations of parents and other stakeholders can generate the basis for vastly improved federal surveys (Recommendation #2) and investigate what diverse types of families need in terms of resources and capacities to promote the health of their family members. Communicating the strengths and potential of families for promoting health can inform policy makers so that state, local and workplace policies flexibly support different types of families to do what they want to be able to do for the health of their members (27). ...
... Although studies of work-family conflict and binge eating were not identified, work-family conflict has been associated with health outcomes, such as poor self-rated health [13], mental illness [14], and unhealthy eating [15]. Recently, authors have suggested that work-family conflict is a partial mediator in the relationship between work-related stress and mental health [16][17][18]. ...
... The potential influence of nursing directors on workers' meal breaks, however, requires further investigation. A few studies have assessed the effect of management and supervisors' attitudes on nurses' mental health (O'Donnell, Ertel, & Berkman, 2011). Although social support from supervisors has been linked to fewer sleep problems and musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) symptoms and healthier behaviors (Sembajwe et al., 2013;Sorensen et al., 2011), it is unclear whether supervisors' general or specific support could influence the frequency of workers' breaks and consequent health outcomes. ...
... Interventions and policies that target reducing these practices might be more successful if they include components to increase facilitators and reduce barriers to the preferred practices, particularly for FCCHs. Future research could also explore how CACFP standards, state licensing regulations, quality-rating-improvement systems, and wellness policies can be leveraged to better support recommended feeding and activity practices and reduce non-recommended practices within centers and FCCHs [68,69]. Additionally, the measurement of child food intake and activity levels would be an important addition to future the observation and interpretation of childcare provider practices. ...
... For example, lower education level, low physical functioning, stressful life events and marital stress and family violence are known risk factors for depression development during menopause transition(Vivian-Taylor and Hickey, 2014). Women living in low-income communities in Brazil are more likely to undergo stressful life events, and low education level, poor sanitation, and depressive symptomatology are associated with this(Surkan, O'Donnell, Berkman, & Peterson, 2009). Also, poor health and unemployment, both situations lived by several people in the Brazilian low-income communities, have detrimental effects on happiness and life satisfaction(Sujarwoto, Tampubolon, & Pierewan, 2018), impacting on the perceived health-related quality of life. ...