Elizabeth A. Sanders's research while affiliated with Trinity Washington University and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Full-text available
Two experiments explored rates for introducing grapheme-phoneme correspondences (GPCs) and the types of correspondences taught for optimal alphabet and early literacy skills learning. In both studies, children entered with minimal alphabet knowledge and were randomly assigned within classrooms to one of two treatments delivered individually over 5...
Article
Measuring and understanding the nature of informant/rater effects and differences (Level 1) on a common trait when the target of measurement is at the organizational level (Level 2) involves a number of methodological considerations. Although previous research has discussed single-level latent variable applications of the correlated trait-correlate...
Article
The authors investigated the influence of teaching letter names and sounds in isolation or in the context of storybook reading on preschool children's early literacy learning and engagement during instruction. Alphabet instruction incorporated paired‐associate learning of correspondences between letter names and sounds. In decontextualized treatmen...
Article
The present study examined the relations between teacher-child interactions, teachers’ Spanish use, classroom linguistic composition, and the school readiness skills of low-income, Latinx, Spanish-speaking dual language learners (DLLs), controlling for home and teacher background characteristics, with a national probability sample of Head Start chi...
Article
In the study, the authors addressed two areas of inquiry: the influence of enlisting three underlying cognitive learning processes in alphabet learning, and order effects for letter name and letter sound instruction. Alphabet instruction was designed to enlist paired‐associate learning (PAL) only, PAL plus orthographic learning, or PAL plus articul...
Article
Full-text available
This study tested whether a 17-day randomized controlled expressive writing (EW) intervention improved cancer caregivers’ emotion regulation ability and if improved emotion regulation predicted increases in verbal person-centered message characteristics present in caregivers’ recalled support conversations with cancer survivors. Participants (N = 6...
Article
This study investigated: 1) the influence of alphabet instructional content (letter names, letter sounds, or both) on alphabet learning and engagement of English only and dual language learner (DLL) children, and 2) the relation between children's initial status and growth in three underlying cognitive learning processes (paired-associate, articula...

Citations

... For instance, when researchers collect reports from teachers and parents, it is an acknowledgment that teachers have expertise in observing youth behavior within one set of social contexts and their constituent contingencies (i.e., school), whereas parents have expertise in observing behavior within an often fundamentally distinct set of contexts and contingencies (i.e., home). As noted in recent work on these issues , the kinds of informants from whom youth mental health scholars collect reports are regarded as structurally different informants, or informants who systematically vary in the processes, through which they provide reports, and the processes bear some relevance to our understanding of the measured domain (see also Eid et al., 2008;Geiser et al., 2012;Konold and Cornell, 2015;Konold and Sanders, 2020). ...
... Children's letter sound knowledge is critical for successful reading and spelling (Hulme et al., 2012), and young children readily learn letter sounds when taught . Moreover, children benefit from teaching letter names and sounds simultaneously (Piasta et al., 2010;Roberts et al., 2018) and when these are introduced at a faster pace (e.g., three per week; Vadasy & Sanders, 2021). Notably, certain letter sounds are more difficult than others (e.g., h, y) and may require additional instructional intensity (Piasta, 2016). ...
... Children's letter sound knowledge is critical for successful reading and spelling (Hulme et al., 2012), and young children readily learn letter sounds when taught . Moreover, children benefit from teaching letter names and sounds simultaneously (Piasta et al., 2010;Roberts et al., 2018) and when these are introduced at a faster pace (e.g., three per week; Vadasy & Sanders, 2021). Notably, certain letter sounds are more difficult than others (e.g., h, y) and may require additional instructional intensity (Piasta, 2016). ...
... Recognised as vital predictors in reading readiness, LNK and LSK greatly influence reading achievement (Sigmundsson, Eriksen, Ofteland, & Haga, 2017;Snow, Burns, & Griffin, 1998). LNK promotes children's LSK and phonemic sensitivity skills thus making LNK and LSK the fundamental skills to help children decode words and write (Foulin, 2005;Roberts, Vadasy, & Sanders, 2019). ...
... e notes in the score image is discrete and evenly distributed, mainly consisting of straight lines or curves in multiple directions, solid and hollow near-circle shapes, and some of the notes have the same shape, with only differences in position, while some of the notes are small and easily confused with the noise in the score [17]. e convolutional layer in the CNN has local connectivity and weight sharing, which can facilitate the extraction of edge features and position information of the notes; the activation function layer can enhance the expressiveness of the CNN and make the CNN microscopic, to realize the nonlinear mapping from low-dimensional simple features to high-dimensional complex features in sheet music images; the pooling layer can reduce the weights while retaining the main features of the convolutional layer. ...
... In order for alphabet knowledge to support decoding and word reading, the names and sounds of all 26 letters need to be memorized and then retrieved not only accurately but also fluently (Clemens, Lai, Burke, & Wu, 2017). Ample research from the science of reading has shown that many beginning readers face challenges in learning the arbitrary connections between letter forms and their names and sounds (Castles et al., 2018), and Roberts, Vadasy, and Sanders (2019) described this process as a form of paired-associate learning. ...
... Regardless of writing approach, both forms appear to create positive outcomes for caregiver well-being. In addition, a multitude of research has found that expressive writing can be helpful for those experiencing illness themselves (Stanton & Dano -Burg, 2002) and for improving caregivers' supportive messages toward care-recipients (Harvey et al., 2019). Given the e cacy of expressive writing across multiple settings and contexts, it can be a useful approach for caregivers or recipients looking for a cost-e ective way to improve health. ...