Elizabeth A Hennon's research while affiliated with University of Evansville and other places

Publications (19)

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This study compared the syntax of boys who have fragile X syndrome (FXS) with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with that of (a) boys who have Down syndrome (DS) and (b) typically developing (TD) boys. Thirty-five boys with FXS only, 36 boys with FXS with ASD, 31 boys with DS, and 46 TD boys participated. Conversational language samples we...
Article
To what extent do children with autism (AD) versus typically developing children (TD) rely on attentional and intentional cues to learn words? Four experiments compared 17 AD children (M age=5.08 years) with 17 language- and 17 mental-age-matched TD children (M ages=2.57 and 3.12 years, respectively) on nonverbal enactment and word-learning tasks....
Article
Boys with fragile X syndrome with (n = 49) and without (n = 33) characteristics of autism spectrum disorder, boys with Down syndrome (39), and typically developing boys (n = 41) were compared on standardized measures of receptive vocabulary, expressive vocabulary, and speech administered annually over 4 years. Three major findings emerged. Boys wit...
Article
We compared the expressive syntax and vocabulary skills of 35 boys with fragile X syndrome and 27 younger typically developing boys who were at similar nonverbal mental levels. During a conversational speech sample, the boys with fragile X syndrome used shorter, less complex utterances and produced fewer different words than did the typically devel...
Article
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To provide descriptive and qualitative information about communication in young children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) and about how families react to and accommodate communication differences in their children. In-depth interviews were conducted with 55 mothers of young children with FXS. Interviewers asked mothers to describe their children's com...
Article
Increased speaking rate is a commonly reported perceptual characteristic among males with fragile X syndrome (FXS). The objective of this preliminary study was to determine articulation rate-one component of perceived speaking rate-and vowel space characteristics of young males with FXS. Young males with FXS (n = 38), developmental age (DA)-matched...
Article
A core task in language acquisition is mapping words onto objects, actions, and events. Two studies investigated how children learn to map novel labels onto novel objects. Study 1 investigated whether 10-month-olds use both perceptual and social cues to learn a word. Study 2, a control study, tested whether infants paired the label with a particula...
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SYNOPSIS Objective. African American children exposed to multiple social risk factors during early childhood often experience academic difficulties, so identifica-tion of protective factors is important. Design. Academic and school behavior trajectories from kindergarten through third grade were studied among 75 African American children who have b...
Article
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In this study, the authors compared the phonological accuracy and patterns of sound change of boys with fragile X syndrome, boys with Down syndrome, and typically developing mental-age-matched boys. Participants were 50 boys with fragile X syndrome, ages 3 to 14 years; 32 boys with Down syndrome, ages 4 to 13 years; and 33 typically developing boys...
Article
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Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited cause of mental retardation resulting in developmental delays in males. Atypical outer ear morphology is characteristic of FXS and may serve as a marker for abnormal auditory function. Despite this abnormality, studies of the hearing of young males with FXS are generally lacking. A few studies h...
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In the first study using point-light displays (lights corresponding to the joints of the human body) to examine children's understanding of verbs, 3-year-olds were tested to see if they could perceive familiar actions that corresponded to motion verbs (e.g., walking). Experiment 1 showed that children could extend familiar motion verbs (e.g., walki...
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The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
Article
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Bloom's eloquent and comprehensive treatment of early word learning holds that social intention is foundational for language development. While we generally support his thesis, we call into question two of his proposals: (1) that attention to social information in the environment implies social intent, and (2) that infants are sensitive to social i...
Article
How do children learn their first words? The field of language development has been polarized by responses to this question. Explanations range from constraints/principles accounts that emphasize the importance of cognitive heuristics in language acquisition, to social-pragmatic accounts that highlight the role of parent-child interaction, to assoc...

Citations

... Patients with the syndrome have long faces with protruding ears and a high forehead, intellectual disabilities, speech disorders, echolalia, anxiety and hyperactivity (Heulens et al. 2013;Roberts et al. 2003;Martin et al. 2012). The majority of FXS cases are caused by CGG repeat expansion in the 5′-UTR of the FMR1 gene. ...
... Do people perceive prosody and co-speech gestures as a coherent unit in everyday interactions? There is some evidence that both adults and infants match the global head and facial movements of the speaker with speech sounds (Graf et al., 2002; Munhall et al., 2004; Blossom and Morgan, 2006; Guellaï et al., 2011). However, it is unknown whether visual prosodic cues that accompany speech, but are not directly triggered by the movements of the vocal tract, are actually used to process the structure of the speech signal. ...
... Researchers who introduce an actor-change in their experimental task (e.g., to test actor memory or verb generalization) often do this by changing between male actors and female actors, as they have naturally distinct appearances (e.g., Mumford 2014). For instance, word learning studies that take an exemplar-based approach could use videos that show different actors performing the same actions and the same actors performing different actions (e.g., Maguire et al. 2002;Maguire et al. 2008;Scott & Fisher 2012). Videos that show different actors moving in the same manner could also be useful for creating generalization tasks to test people's understanding of locomotion verbs (e.g., Imai et al. 2008), and recognition tasks and change-detection tasks to test their memory of actors (e.g., Imai et al. 2005;Wood 2008). ...
... It is well established that young children use social cues like pointing and eye gaze to infer the intended referents of novel words (Baldwin & Tomasello, 1998;Hollich et al., 2000). Although this ability begins to emerge in the second year (e.g., Baldwin, 1991;Hennon, Chung, & Brown, 2000;Pruden, Hirsh-Pasek, Golinkoff, & Hennon, 2006), it continues to develop for some time thereafter (Baldwin, 1993;Booth, McGregor, & Rohlfing, 2008;Brand, 2000;Woodward, 2004). Moreover, several reports indicate that children's sensitivity to referential social cues is related to the size of their vocabulary (e.g., Brooks & Meltzoff, 2005;Carpenter, Nagell, & Tomasello, 1998;Mundy & Gomes, 1998). ...
... We know that there are such things as meanings, and that they have a certain kind of existence because they are used by human beings, and human beings are special beings because, unlike other beings and entities, they think, desire, speak, and so on. Moreover, as some authors have observed, theory of mind would not even be necessary to explain human beings' capacity to learn words (Cimatti, 1999, 2000, Geurts, 2000, Hirsh-Pasek et al., 2001). The role that theory of mind is supposed to play in word learning could be ascribed just as well to some other mechanisms, such as association, reinforcement, etc. ...
... However, lower socioeconomic status does not universally result in suboptimal parenting and poor children's outcomes. More responsive and stimulating parenting mitigates the impact of social risk factors on children's outcomes, and parents can be supported to develop such parenting skills and styles (Burchinal et al., 2006). Parental functioning is thought to be determined, in general terms, by the psychological resources of parents, characteristics of children and sources of stress and support (Belsky, 1984). ...
... Elles ont en commun de considérer, à un niveau ou un autre, le fondement communicationnel de la langue et du langage et considèrent le plus souvent que la langue n'est pas donnée à l'enfant a priori mais qu'elle fait l'objet d'une construction/élaboration par l'enfant au cours de son développement physiologique, psychique et social. Sans entrer dans le détail, ces approches se distinguent à leur tour par la part qu'elles attribuent à un certain degré de prédétermination ou de contraintes cognitives ou physiologiques (Slobin 1973;Hirsh-Pasek, Golinkoff et al. 2004;MacWhinney 2005), à l'activité de l'enfant (cf. les approches constructivistes (Veneziano 1997;Tomasello 2004), à l'inscription sociale et à la dimension socio-pragmatique de l'acquisition (Bruner 1987;Veneziano 1997;Tomasello 2004;Nelson 2007), au rôle de l'adulte et de l'interaction (Bruner , 1987Gallaway & Richards 1994;Veneziano 2000) selon la place qu'ils confèrent au dialogue et au discours (François, Hudelot & Sabeau-Jouannet 1984;François 1993François , 2004. ...
... A wealth of developmental research has found a shape bias in early word-learning in which children generalize word labels to similar objects (e.g., different kinds of spoons) because they have a similar shape or outline, rather than other perceptual qualities such as size or color (e.g., Collisson, Grela, Spaulding, Rueckl, & Magnuson, 2015). A version of the shape bias has also been found in verb-learning in which children generalize word labels for verbs based on how consistent the outline, or shape, of an action is (e.g., a verb like running has a more consistent shape than a verb like thinking; Golinkoff et al., 2002). ...
... Early studies have shown that before 2 years, children are above chance only in the follow-in condition. However, from 24 months onward, children show learning in both conditions, also revealing more contingent looking: coordinated attention between the speaker and the intended object (Baldwin, 1993;Baldwin et al., 1996;Moore et al., 1999;Hollich et al., 2000). ...
... The characteristics of these channels will be described later. Fragile X patients are hypersensitive to auditory stimuli (St Clair et al., 1987;Arinami et al., 1988;Rojas et al., 2001;Castren et al., 2003;Roberts et al., 2005;Van der Molen et al., 2012) and are impaired in their ability to discriminate interaural timing, rendering them unable to localize sounds (Hall et al., 2009;Rotschafer and Razak, 2014). A second genetic condition is Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 13 (SCA13), a movement disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Kv3.3 channel . ...