Edward O. Mulholland's research while affiliated with University College Cork and other places

Publications (13)

Article
The compositional and functional properties of commercial retail and/or wholesale samples (n = 8) of low-moisture mozzarella, cheddar and analogue (pizza) cheeses were compared. Inter-and intravariety differences were evident with intravariety differences in composition being relatively large for the analogue cheese. Cheddar had the lowest mean pH...
Article
Bulk milk from a spring-calved dairy herd on a good plane of nutrition was collected and made into low-moisture Mozzarella cheese weekly over 10 weeks from 22 September (218 days in lactation, DIL) to 27 November (284 DIL). The 10 weeks were divided into three lactation periods: normal lactation (NL), 218–240 DIL; late lactation (LL), 241–265 DIL;...
Article
Twenty-three Cheddar cheeses were prepared from milks with a protein content of 3.66% (wt/wt) and with different protein-to-fat ratio (PFR) in the range 0.70 to 1.15; the PFR of each milk differed by 0.02. For statistical analysis, the 23 cheeses were divided into 3 PFR groups: low (LPFR; 0.70 to 0.85), medium (MPFR; 0.88 to 1.00) and high (HPFR; 1...
Article
Cheddar type cheeses of different fat contents were produced and denoted: full-fat (FFC), 306g/kg; half-fat (HFC), 174 g/kg; and low fat (LFC, 13 g/kg). Full-fat Cheddar cheese (FFCH) was also prepared from milk which had been homogenized at first and second stage pressures of 25 and 5 MPa, respectively. The cheeses were held at 4C for 30 days and...
Article
The influence of diet quality on the suitability of milk for cheddar cheese manufacture was investigated. Milk was collected from two spring-calving herds, each of 16 Friesian-Holstein cows. The herds were offered either a restricted diet, consisting of a restricted grass supply, or a supplemented diet, consisting of a standard grass supply with a...
Article
Full-text available
Three different salting methods were investigated for their effects on composition, yield and age-related changes in proteolysis, texture and functional characteristics of low moisture Mozzarella cheese (LMMC) stored at 4 °C for 75 d. The salting methods were: (i) dry salting (DS) by direct addition of dry salt (at a level of 4.6% w/w) to the mille...
Article
Milk was collected from three spring-calving herds, on different daily herbage allowances (DHA) of perennial rye-grass (16, 20 or 24 kg dry matter (DM)/cow for a 17 week period. On five occasions, at weekly intervals in the middle of the period, the three different milks were converted into low-moisture part-skim Mozzarella cheese. Increasing the D...
Article
Reduced fat milks were pasteurized, for 15 s, at temperatures ranging from 72 to 88°C to give levels of whey protein denaturation varying from ˜ 3 to 35%. The milks were converted into reduced fat cheddar cheese (16–18% fat) in 500 litre cheese vats; the resultant cheese curds were milled at pH values of 5.75 and 5.35. Raising the milk pasteurizati...
Article
Milk was collected from three spring-calving herds, on different daily herbage allowances (DHA) of perennial rye-grass (16, 20 or 24 kg dry matter (DM)/cow for a 17 week period. On five occasions, at weekly intervals in the middle of the period, the three different milks were converted into low-moisture part-skim Mozzarella cheese. Increasin...
Article
Skim milks were concentrated by ultrafiltration. Cream was added to the retentates to give cheesemilks standardized to a casein: fat ratio of 0·74 with protein levels ranging from 30 to 46 g/1. Pasteurized cheesemilks were renneted on a volume basis (22 ml single strength calf rennet/100 1) and converted to Cheddar cheese in 500 1 cheese vats. Set...
Article
Standardized milks, heated at 72–100 °C to denature ~5–63% of the whey protein, were ultrafiltered to yield retentates with protein and fat levels of ~18.5 and 14%, respectively. Retentates were converted into semi-hard cheeses using specialized coagulation and gel-cutting equipment, with scalding and further syneresis being carried out in conventi...
Article
Skim milks were pre-acidified to pH 6·4 and concentrated by ultra-filtration to give retentates with protein levels of 210 g/1. Retentates were blended with skim milk and cream to give standardized milks with protein levels ranging from 30 to 82 g/1. These were used for the manufacture of Cheddar cheese in conventional equipment. Increasing milk pr...
Article
The effect of commercial enzyme preparations, in combination with freeze-shocked-lactose negative Lactococcus lactis subsp. diacetylactis, on the proteolysis, texture and flavour development in Cheddar cheeses ripened at 5, 10, or 15°C was examined over a 240-day maturation period. Enzymes, i.e. neutrase, FlavourAge-FR and lyophilized rennet (at di...

Citations

... Overall, we succeeded in obtaining cheeses with a similar gross composition, and similar total Na and Ca contents (P > 0.05) ( Table 2). Equalising the contents of total Na is necessary to normalise its influence on the protein's water-binding capacity and proteolysis (Guinee, 2004;Guinee, Mulholland, Mullins, & Corcoran, 2000b;Guo, Gilmore, & Kindstedt, 1997;Smith, Hindmarsh, Carr, Golding, & Reid, 2017). Hence, any influence of the treatment in the current study on the functionality of the cheese is likely related to biochemical changes in the calciumphosphate para-casein matrix (pH, level of insoluble Ca or P, pH4.6SN). ...
... explain the lack of differences observed between treatment RCT values. In addition, past studies have demonstrated that increased milk CN concentrations have resulted in shorter RCT (Guinee, Mulholland, O'Brien, & Murphy, 2001). Casein is an important gel-forming protein and increases can enhance the rate of CN aggregation (Guinee et al., 1997). ...
... This can be ascribed to the short time of storage and the low temperature adopted during the ripening. Indeed, it is well known that cheese proteolysis is affected by ripening time and temperature [60,61]. The increase in temperature has long been used to accelerate proteolysis and consequently to reduce the cheese ripening time [62,63]. ...
... All cheeses in our study were made from cheese milks with the same casein contents. In practice, in milks with higher protein levels (> 4.0%), the cutting process becomes more difficult because of short gelation times and very rapid gel-firming rates (Sutherland and Jameson, 1981;Guinee et al., 1994). Thus, to reduce the rate of protein aggregation in our cheese milks, as we had used high casein contents (~5%), the renneting temperature was reduced from 32°C to 28.9°C for all the cheese milks (Govindasamy- Lucey et al., 2011). ...
... Additionally, salt in the cheese contributes to salting-in and hydration of the casein during early storage (Guo et al.,1997) due to exchange of casein-bound Ca with Na. The increase in pH is of comparable magnitude to that reported previously for LMPS mozzarella (Guo et al., 1997;Guinee et al., 1998) and has been attributed to 6SN)], firmness, crossover temperature (COT), maximum value of the loss tangent (LT max ), extension work at 0 or 5 min after melting (EW 0 or EW 5 , respectively), and flow of commercial low-moisture part-skim mozzarella cheeses. The data presented are mean values of 7 different production dates, except for those for serum distribution properties, which were measured for 3 different production dates only (Table 1). ...
... The yield of ultrafiltered goat milk cheese with no added fat (13.23 ± 0.60) was approximately 1.5 times high as compared to skimmed goat milk cheese (8.76 ± 0.61). The yield of all the ultrafiltered cheese samples increased significantly (P < 0.05) with protein content which was in general agreement to the results mentioned by Guinee, O'Callaghan, Mulholland, & Harrington (1996). ...
... It has outstanding rennet coagulation, gelling and firming properties for the production of curdin particular high k-casein and superb proportions amongst protein, whey protein, types of casein and fats (Ariota et al., 2007;Abesinghe et al., 2020;Islam et al., 2014). The higher fat content of buffalo milk is very important as it leads to higher ratio with protein and hence to superior elastic property of the curd (Ariota et al., 2007), and these are the major components influencing the quality of the manufactured cheese (Guinee et al., 2000;Barron et al., 2001). In association with the higher fat content and dry matter, during ripening buffalo cheese is characterized by lower intensity of physical and chemical changes and lower lipolytic activity, as Ivanov et al. (2016) conclude. ...
... The total solids content of the FF and RF cheeses ranged from 61.63 to 64.92% and from 50.53 to 56.43% for FF and RF cheeses, respectively, thus meeting the legal compositional requirement in FF and RF Cheddar cheese [38]. The moisture in fat-free solids (MFFS) content of the FF cheeses ranged from 54.00 to 56.9% (Table 1), it was higher than that reported by Guinee et al., in 2008 [35] and by Fenelon et al. [36], however, it was similar to what had been reported earlier by Guinee et al. [39]. The (MFFS) content of the RF cheeses ranged from 53.03 to 60.80% (Table 1) and was slightly higher than that reported earlier [36]. ...
... Late-lactation milk has shown poor rennet coagulability, impaired curd syneresis, high moisture content in Cheddar cheese and lower recovery of total milk fat in the cheese (Auldist et al., 1996). Maintenance of good nutritional status in spring-calved herds as they transition into late lactation (278 days in lactation) has been found to maintain better milk processing quality (heat stability, free FA levels, alcohol stability and rennet coagulation properties), as lactose, protein and casein contents were maintained at >4.3% (w/w), 3.6% (w/w) and 2.8% (w/w), respectively (Guinee et al., 2007;Guinee & O'Brien, 2010). O'Connell et al. (2016) investigated the effects of storage temperature and duration on microbial quality of bulk tank milk in mid and late lactation, and showed that proteolytic bacterial count was greater in milk in the latter stages of lactation. ...
... Similar results on the characteristics of cheese made with pasteurized milk at different temperatures were obtained from previous studies [43,44]. As the pasteurization temperature increased, the moisture content increased, the fat and protein content decreased, and the pH values also decreased. ...