Edward Carney's research while affiliated with American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and other places

Publications (18)

Article
Purpose: Computer simulation was used to estimate the statistical properties of searches for maximum word recognition ability (PB max). These involve presenting multiple lists and discarding all scores but that of the 1 list that produced the highest score. The simulations, which model limitations inherent in the precision of word recognition scor...
Article
Purpose: The purpose of this article is to examine explanations for pure-tone average-spondee threshold differences in functional hearing loss. Method: Loudness magnitude estimation functions were obtained from 24 participants for pure tones (0.5 and 1.0 kHz), vowels, spondees, and speech-shaped noise as a function of level (20-90 dB SPL). Parti...
Article
The current ANSI standard (ANSI S3.4, 2007) estimates the loudness of sustained sound, but many naturally occurring sounds have time-varying levels. Glasberg and Moore (2002) published a model for the prediction of time-varying sounds and this aspect should be considered as part of a revision to the ANSI standard. To assess the predictions of the d...
Article
The ability to detect auditory-visual correspondence in speech is an early hallmark of typical language development. Infants are able to detect audiovisual mismatches for spoken vowels such as /a/ and /i/ as early as 4 months of age. While adult event-related potential (ERP) data have shown an N300 associated with the detection of audiovisual incon...
Article
To examine the risk for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in university marching band members and to provide an overview of a hearing conservation program for a marching band. Sound levels during band rehearsals were recorded and audiometric hearing thresholds and transient otoacoustic emission were measured over a 3-year period. Musician's earplug...
Article
PURPOSE: To examine the risk for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in university marching band students and to provide an overview of a hearing conservation program for a marching band. METHOD: Sound levels during band rehearsals were recorded and audiometric hearing thresholds and TEOAEs were measured over a three-year period. Musician's earplugs...
Article
This tutorial provides framework and context for understanding the complex interaction of hearing measurement methodology and cohort social factors, as well as their relation to approaches to data interpretation and identification of minimal hearing loss (HL) in audiometric surveys. Pertinent archival studies were reviewed, and an original analysis...
Article
Full-text available
Speech scientists have long proposed that formant exaggeration in infant-directed speech plays an important role in language acquisition. This event-related potential (ERP) study investigated neural coding of formant-exaggerated speech in 6-12-month-old infants. Two synthetic /i/ vowels were presented in alternating blocks to test the effects of fo...
Article
To estimate false-positive rates for rules proposed to identify early noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) using the presence of notches in audiograms. Audiograms collected from school-age children in a national survey of health and nutrition (the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey [NHANES III]; National Center for Health Statistic...
Article
The current investigation compared directed scanning and group-item scanning among typically developing 4-year-old children. Of specific interest were their accuracy, selection speed, and efficiency of cursor movement in selecting colored line drawn symbols representing object vocabulary. Twelve 4-year-olds made selections in both directed and grou...
Article
Speech scientists have long proposed that formant-exaggerated speech plays an important role in phonetic learning and language acquisition. However, there have been very little neurophysiological data on how the infant brain and adult brain respond to formant exaggeration in speech. We employed event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate neural...
Article
Full-text available
This article has two primary aims. The first is to introduce a new Vietnamese text-based corpus. The Corpora of Vietnamese Texts (CVT; Tang, 2006a) consists of approximately 1 million words drawn from newspapers and children's literature, and is available online at www.vnspeechtherapy.com/vi/CVT. The second aim is to investigate potential differenc...
Article
Significant threshold differences on retest for pure-tone audiometry are often evaluated by application of ad hoc rules, such as a shift in a pure-tone average or in 2 adjacent frequencies that exceeds a predefined amount. Rules that are so derived do not consider the probability of observing a particular audiogram. A general solution for evaluatin...
Article
To construct a table for upper and lower limits of the 95% critical range for changes in word recognition scores obtained with monosyllabic word lists (of lengths 10, 25, 50, and 100 words) using newly available methods. Although such a table has been available for nearly 30 years (A. R. Thornton & M. J. M. Raffin, 1978), the earlier table was cons...
Article
To investigate relationships between self-monitoring operationalized by predicting recall and study strategy decisions made by adults with diffuse, acquired brain injury (ABI) and adults without ABI. Eighteen adults with ABI and 16 without ABI studied two lists of unrelated noun-pairs, made item-by-item immediate and delayed recall predictions and...
Article
This study explored the impact of recent demographic changes on clinical service delivery in the state of Minnesota. A Web-based survey was used to ask speech-language pathologists in Minnesota about their training, clinical caseloads, and professional experiences with respect to diversity. Primary survey goals were to (a) determine if, and how, re...
Article
Forced-choice adaptive procedures enjoy widespread use for the measurement of detection and discrimination thresholds. Zwislocki et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 30, 254-262 (1958)] proposed an adaptive procedure with a decision rule that targets 75% correct several years before these procedures gained acceptance in psychophysics, and even today little...
Article
Forced-choice adaptive procedures enjoy widespread use for measurement of detection and discrimination thresholds. Using computer simulations and behavioral data, this paper examines the effect of step size (2 and 4 dB), decision rule (targets =70.7%, 75%, and 79.4% correct) and initial starting level on thresholds obtained under conditions of inat...

Citations

... The accuracy and precision of the estimate of auditory performance can be improved by increasing the number of trials, but some degree of statistical variability is unavoidable when estimating performance from a finite number of observations. Perfect precision would require averaging performance across an infinite number of trials (Gelfand, 1998;Schlauch and Carney, 2018). ...
... In the literature, a wide range of approaches have been proposed to identify and diagnose hearing impairment such as pure-tone testing [5], speech testing [6], middle ear testing [7], auditory brainstem response (ABR) [8], and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). However, pure tone and speech audiometry are the most widely used approaches by audiologists [9][10][11]. In pure tone audiometry (PTA), hearing is measured over a range of pure tones in each ear. ...
... Their findings suggest that vowel discrepancy significantly reduces the magnitude of the fusion effect. In our previous experiment for the vowels, /i/ and /a/, following the McGurk design using synchronized videos (Zhang et al., 2013), the incongruent audio-visual pairing did not lead to perceived fusion of an altered vowel identity in our adult listeners. Since our present study used a static face visual exhibiting the mouth shape corresponding to a vowel rather than a consonant with a 400 ms time lag for the following audio, it is unlikely that there is a fusion-type 20 effect in the responses. ...
... A study of average sound levels associated with high school and university marching bands, which are especially popular in the U.S.A., reported a range of 95-122 dB(A) for drum sections and 106-118 dB(A) for cymbal sections, both greatly exceeding the NIOSH REL [144] (see also [145,146]). However, the only audiometric study on university marching band members that I could find failed to detect evidence of PTS in the conventional frequency range [147]. ...
... Additionally, the issue may be a delay between exposure to hazardous noise and development of permanent hearing loss. 20 However, this may partially explain why there was no clear association between the many adolescent hazardous noise exposures which were queried in this study and referral on the high-frequency screen or sound treated booth testing. ...
... In contrast to this study, according to Pujol, some authors assessed levels and rated children in quiet conditions to ensure that the observed noise effects were due to chronic and non-transient exposure during the test period [19] [20] [21]. Some authors also measured internal or external noise levels during testing in order to adjust noise levels during analysis. ...
... Frontal theta band modulations are also associated with memory processes (Begus et al., 2015;Jensen & Tesche, 2002) and are thought to reflect infants' learning of new information (Begus & Bonawitz, 2020). For instance, findings on neural processing of infantdirected speech provide evidence for an increase in infants' frontal theta power when listening to infant-directed speech compared to control conditions (Orekhova et al., 2006;Zhang et al., 2011). Thus, frontal theta band power is a promising neural measure to assess infants attentional processing during IDAs. ...
... Although the M-NIHL method was shown to have high sensitivity (Lowe & Moore, 2021;Moore, 2020), its specificity was only moderate (Moore & von Gablenz, 2021). This moderate specificity is probably a consequence of the high prevalence of mild hearing loss at high frequencies and the moderately high prevalence of small audiometric notches among the general population (Pudrith et al., 2022;Schlauch & Carney, 2011). However, it may also be partly a consequence of some problems with the M-NIHL method. ...
... Scanning is a primary access option for children with significant motor impairments who cannot directly select items using a keyboard or display system (Beukelman & Mirenda, 2013). Research to date has shown that learning to scan is a difficult task for preschool age children (Wagner & Jackson, 2006;White, Carney, & Reichle, 2010). This may be due to the scanning pattern as well as demands on memory and attention. ...
... Subsequent studies found expanded vowel spaces in the IDS of other languages, such as French, Chinese, and Japanese (Dodane & Al-Tamimi, 2007;Liu, Kuhl, & Tsao, 2003). Furthermore, a number of studies, taking this hypothesis as given, have investigated the computational and neural processes underlying the perception of hyperarticulated vowels, as well as the consequences of hearing hyperarticulated vowels on infants' ability to discriminate them (Bernsteinn, 1984;Malsheen, 1980;Sebastián-Gallés & Bosch, 2009;Whiteside & Hodgson, 2000;Zhang, Miller, Tess, & Carney, 2010). Through these studies, the hyperarticulation hypothesis has become a widely accepted view with regard to the nature of IDS segments. ...