E. Wenger's research while affiliated with Cambridge and other places

Publications (5)

Article
We now can begin to turn the observations of the previous chapter into objects to be analyzed. In the following sections, we recast the central characteristics of these several historical realizations of apprenticeship in terms of legitimate peripheral participation. First, we discuss the structuring resources that shape the process and content of...

Citations

... Typically, within the classroom is the learner, which includes both the student and the teacher (Lieberman, 1995). We acknowledge that these systems are not cleanly nested, and networks between, across, or outside of them may affect learners within (Lave & Wenger, 1991;Wenger, 1998;Wilson, 1993). This perspective views learning as contextual and social and influenced by factors occurring within and outside of these systems (Peressini et al., 2004). ...
... Research suggests that Communities of Practice can be integral to creating programmatic and institutional change, provided that such communities have well-defined goals, a clearly articulated structure for collaboration, and commonly shared understanding of how to support minoritized students' success in STEM in both the near-and long-term (Kezar and Gehrke, 2017). For the Sci/ Comm Scholars, a key component of this collaborative structure was faculty and peer mentoring, which has been shown to be influential on both academic and professional success for minoritized students, as it provides space for students to experience validation, to engage in realistic self-assessment, and to develop self-efficacy (Trujillo, et al., 2015;Ko, et al., 2014;Nora and Crisp, 2007;Lave and Wenger, 1991). Furthermore, studies have also indicated that not having access to mentoring relationships can result in students having access to fewer field research experiences, and increase the likelihood that minoritized students leave STEM for other disciplines (Carlone and Johnson, 2007;Johnson, 2007). ...
... However, they teach a limited group of students, and their practice does not offer interaction with special education needs (SEN) students regularly. Pre-service teachers are legitimate peripheral participants in communities of practice, meaning they are becoming experienced members (Lave & Wenger, 2001). If the community of practice consists of teacher educators teaching about inclusive education for all, who themselves are peripheral participants, this affects the teacher students' possibilities to develop. ...
... In the context of clinical dental education, students and academics come together in pursuit of a shared enterprise. Through "legitimate peripheral participation", active engagement and assuming increasing responsibility, the student in this session acquired the role, skills, and values of the culture and community (Lave & Wenger, 1999). ...
... Communities of Practice (CoPs) offer a promising mode of delivery for continuous group learning and problem solving [6]. Communities of Practice (CoPs) are groups of people with a common work objective who meet regularly to support each other, share and create knowledge, and explore innovations [6,7]. ...