E. Heise's scientific contributions

Citations

... When referring to mixed gender groups of people or to groups whose gender composition is unknown or irrelevant , it is customary in grammatical gender languages to use masculines generically (e.g., Lehrer, to denote a group of male and female teachers). This linguistic convention has long been criticized for its inherent sexism (e.g., Bussmann, 1995; Trömel-Plötz, 1982): Psycholinguistic research has shown quite consistently that generic masculines trigger male-only associations and inferences, rather than gender balanced associations in recipients' mental representations (e.g., Braun, Gottburgsen, Sczesny, & Stahlberg, 1998; Heise, 2000 Heise, , 2003 Rothmund & Scheele, 2004; Stahlberg, Sczesny, & Braun, 2001; Vervecken et al., 2013; see Gygax & Gabriel, 2011, for a review). For instance, Gygax et al. (2012) asked their French participants to work on a word association task in which they had to decide whether a person introduced by a kinship term (e.g., aunt) could be part of a group represented by a role name presented in a generic masculine form (e.g., actors). ...