E. Abule's scientific contributions

Publications (6)

Article
A survey was conducted in Hamer and Benna-Tsemay districts of the South Omo zone of Ethiopia, with the objectives of assessing the range-livestock management practices and perceptions of the different pastoral groups (Hamer, Benna, and Tsemay) towards rangeland degradation. This information is considered to be vital to future pastoral development p...
Article
The objective of this study was to determine the condition and grazing capacity of commonly grazed rangeland of pastoralists living in the Kereyu-Fantale and Awash-Fantale districts of Ethiopia. In each of the districts, data on grass species composition, basal cover, bare ground, soil erosion and dry matter (DM) yield were collected. The most domi...
Article
Although a few studies have reported an increase of woody plants in the rangelands of Ethiopia during the last few decades, most studies related to the importance of tree canopies have been conducted in lightly grazed areas that have suffered little disturbance. The woody vegetation composition, density, evapotranspiration tree equivalent (ETTE), b...
Article
Two neighboring districts inhabited by pastoralists of different ethnic groups in the Middle Awash valley of Ethiopia were studied to make a preliminary investigation of the soil nutrient status and identifying the environmental factors most critical to grass production. Data were collected on soil nutrient status, grass yield (dry matter), percent...
Article
Pastoralism is the most dominant land use form in the arid rangelands of Sub-Saharan Africa, but this rangeland-based lifestyle is under threat. As a consequence a study was conducted in the Middle Awash Valley of Ethiopia with the main objectives of assessing and comparing the broad perceptions of two pastoral groups (the Oromo ethnic group living...
Article
The objectives of the study, conducted during the 2000/01 growing season in the Middle Awash Valley of Ethiopia, were to quantify the effects of two dominant woody species (Acacia tortilis and Balanites aegyptica) on grass species composition, grass dry matter (DM) yield and soil under light, medium and heavy grazing. At each study site two sub-hab...

Citations

... The impact of grazing on diversity differs along gradients of primary productivity (Milchunas & Lauenroth, 1993), but there is no general consensus about the process involved in this interaction. Grazing intensity affects the quantity and quality of organic and mineralized materials that are delivered to the litter and soil as vegetative residues, urine, and manure (Abule, Snyman, & Smit, 2007). Grazing also affects the quality of herbage in the sward and this ultimately impacts degradation rate of litter, soil organic matter, and soil nutrient mineralization rates (Allsopp, Laurent, Debeaudoin, & Igshaan Samuels, 2007). ...
... Rangelands in such settings are vulnerable to wind and soil erosion, resulting in a loss of soil fertility and seed [32]. The land degradation problem can be reversed through reseeding in severely degraded rangelands where the soil seed bank has entirely depleted or where the relative number of beneficial species has gone below threshold levels (10-15 percent) [33]. In order for restoration of degraded rangeland initiatives to be successful in the short term, seed must be introduced. ...
... For example, the effect of Acacia trees on Soil Syst. 2022, 6, 44 3 of 19 the soil's physical, chemical and biological properties have been studied extensively in different settings [57][58][59]. ...
... Species composition is defined as the relative frequency of occurrence of heterogeneous herbaceous species in a rangeland (Trollope et al., 1990). In addition, it is one of the factors that indicate the rangeland condition because herbaceous species differ significantly in their acceptability, ecological status, life form and response to grazing (Abule et al., 2007). It has been reported that, high grazing pressure on natural rangelands causes changes in species composition (Maki et al., 2007). ...
... The study constituted 77% of males and 23% were females (Table 2). Comparable findings were reported in same Province (Mthi and Nyangiwe, 2018;Mthi et al. 2021) and Southern region of Ethiopia (Admasu et al. 2010). These finding contracts with Tokozwayo et al (2018) who recorded a higher proportion of females (62%) participated in a survey, but discovered that livestock were mainly owned by males (38%). ...
... Decline of traditional knowledge: Rangeland degradation is exacerbated by the loss of traditional indigenous knowledge and a fall in elder participation in rangeland management. Despite global awareness of the conventional system of resource administration's relevance, policymakers, leaders, scholars, and development workers continue to place little emphasis on it [20]. Traditional rangeland and livestock management strategies described from East African countries included herd diversification and communal land free roaming (Oba and Kotile, 2001). ...