Dorothy A. Winsor's research while affiliated with Iowa State University and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Full-text available
The vast majority of people who use information technology (IT) every day use IT in textcentered interactions. In e-mail, we compose and read texts. On the Web, we read (and often compose) texts. And when we create and refer to the appointments and notes in our personal digital assistants, we use texts. Texts, as already a technology in themselves,...
Article
Full-text available
Most people who use information technology (IT) every day use IT in text-centered interactions. In e-mail, we compose and read texts. On the Web, we read (and often compose) texts. And when we create and refer to the appointments and notes in our personal digital assistants, we use texts. Texts are deeply embedded in cultural, cognitive, and materi...
Article
Within work sites that engage in knowledge work, newcomers have particular difficulty acquiring knowledge because knowledge keeps changing. Newcomers have to assimilate currently accepted knowledge while remaining open to learning and even generating new knowledge. Such acquisition and generation of communal knowledge are examples of distributed co...
Article
Within complex organizations, people are members of various and sometimes conflicting subgroupings. Texts function between and across these various subgroupings to simultaneously bridge the gap between them (and thus allow joint work to be done) and yet maintain existing structures of power and territory. This study reports observations of blue-col...
Article
Rhetoric continues to struggle to theorize the simultaneous existence of pattern and contingency. Responses to this issue have been couched in elaborations of genre theory and, more recently, of Vygotskian activity theory. Activity theory offers two advantages in theorizing how change and continuity can coexist: It expands our ability to see how te...
Article
Engineers' use of rhetoric differs from that of scientists because of the material objects engineers work with and the material conditions under which they act. For engineers, “publication” takes the form of releasing a marketable object, not a refereed article. Thus, they have less need than scientists do to create written theoretical work and can...

Citations

... Though many readers treat electronic texts as they would print texts, and multiple studies note that technology has negligible effects on one's writing (e.g. Walsh & Maloney, 2002;Hartley, 2007), how we view and value digital media instead of, and alongside, traditional texts (Condon, 1998;Webb, 2000;Geisler, et al., 2001;O'Gorman, 2006) remains an ongoing investigation that only grows more complex as social technology breaks down previous genres while creating new ones. Genres are not necessarily any more stable than the texts they wish to bind, even though our reliance on them in the writing classroom is often evident in our course titles (e.g. ...
... While some scholarship, such as Heath's (1983) study, considers schools and community programs as literacy sponsors, few studies exist that are related to the examination of a particular workplace as a literacy sponsor. Studies that examine workplace literacy practices, like Winsor (2000), have considered relations between workplace practices and certain community-related literacy practices. Also, C. S. examines historical practices at a single company and changes therein, and J. M. Staggers (2006) provides a systematic analysis of the relationship between certain communication practices within a given workplace and their affect on a particular geographic community in her award-winning dissertation about risk communication and the development of the atomic bomb. ...
... Our study provides additional qualitative evidence of memory at work, as described by Leijten et al. (2014). It further supports Van Ittersum's (2009) and Leijten et al.'s findings that writers use multiple physical and digital sources when composing and builds on the foundation that Winsor (1990Winsor ( , 1992Winsor ( , 1998Winsor ( , 1999Winsor ( , 2001 laid in multiple studies. In the future, qualitative writing researchers might further explore the roles of distributed memory and distributed cognition in engineering writing processes. ...
... Wenger (1998) develops a definition around groups of professionals, sharing common tasks and responsibilities. For the authors and other (Winsor, 2001;Bielaczyc and Collins, 1999), one key feature of CoP is the dissemination of knowledge through communication. ...
... The analysis suggests that the use of digital communication is not only a way to convey and request information but also a way to document actions and decisions. Writing scholar Dorothy Winsor's (1999) take on documentation is of analytical use here: "[documentation concerns] the representation of past or future action used to build agreement about how that action is to be defined or perceived " (1999:207). Seen from this perspective, the actions that I argue serve to create a latent means of prevention seem to involve a postponement of the construction of agreement about their perception, forestalling their reception. ...
... The information age has altered the ways in which we communicate and placed an increasing emphasis on written digital communications [Geisler et al., 2001]. Written digital communications involves any type of interaction that make use of written words in digital mediums such as ebooks, dialogues, forums, articles, memos, or emails. ...