Dorina Maria Buda's research while affiliated with University of Groningen and other places

Publications (13)

Article
Connections between socio-spatial complexity in a social domain and Foucauldian discourse analysis gain momentum in the wider social sciences, but have been marginalized in leisure and tourism research. We combine, explore and expand theories of socio-spatial complexity with leisure-led regional development and Foucauldian discourse analysis, for t...
Article
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This conceptual article brings to the attention of tourism scholars new possibilities to theorize dark tourism as an affective socio-spatial encounter. To do so, we frame dark tourism within theories of affect and, in particular, geographies of affect. We show how debates around dark tourism terminology and taxonomies, in most cases underlie consid...
Chapter
The relative simplicity of the term ‘dark tourism’, which has achieved a broad if not contested acceptance within academia and industry alike, is in contrast to the multifaceted nature of the phenomenon. Embedded in this complexity is the association dark tourism makes between the presentation and consumption of death in the context of tourism, as...
Article
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Editorial in "The Future of City Tourism", spcial issue of the Journal of Tourism Futures. Open Access. Contributions from "The Future of City Tourism", special issue of the Journal of Tourism Futures, has just been published in Open Access. Edited by Albert Postma, Dorina Maria Buda and Katharina Gugerell. With contributions from Tom Griffin, Fre...
Article
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Local and regional governments in western European peripheral areas aim to spur leisure-led regional development. We explore planning for leisure by applying an evolutionary economic geography (EEG) approach from a complexity perspective. We identify conditions which enable and constrain leisure development and its effects on the region as a whole....
Article
Full-text available
Local and regional governments in western European peripheral areas aim to spur leisure-led regional development. Assuming that planning for leisure is a complex and highly unpredictable process, we explore this process by applying an evolutionary economic geography (EEG) approach from a complexity perspective. We identify conditions which enable a...
Article
In this article, the workings of tourism in areas of sociopolitical turmoil are critically examined. In so doing the aim is to scrutinize interconnections between tourism, safety, and conflict as I contend that tourism, tourists and the danger generated by ongoing sociopolitical conflicts are intimately connected. The empirical focus is on tourism...
Book
This book brings together, explores and expands socio-spatial affect, emotion and psychoanalytic drives in tourism for the first time. Affect is to be found in visceral intensities and resonances that circulate around and shape encounters between and amongst tourists, local tourism representatives and places. When affect manifests, it can 'take sha...
Article
The psychoanalytical concept of the death drive postulated by Freud and Lacan refers to a constant force at the junction between life and death, which is not understood in a biological sense of physical demise of the body, nor in opposition to life. Tourist experiences in conflict zones can be more critically understood through the lens of the deat...
Article
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Desire is a continuous force, fundamentally eccentric and insatiable, yet insufficiently explored in tourism studies. To examine desire in tourism to ‘unusual’ places of darkness and danger we propose four interpretations of this psychoanalytic concept: desire as recognition, ‘object’ cause of desire, desire for novelty, and desire for fantasy. Ini...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to propose voyeurism as one possible lens to analyse the experiential nature of dark tourism in places of socio‐political danger, thus expanding psychoanalytic understandings of those who travel to a “dark” place. Design/methodology/approach Freud's and Lacan's theories on voyeurism are used to examine the desi...

Citations

... In the 20th century the activities tourism, leisure or sport, quickly turned out to be strong economic stimuli for many communities and businesses worldwide (Sevil, 2018;World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), 2019). Since these activities result in various impacts upon economies, societies and natural environments, they appear to be an important study focus for researchers across several scientific disciplines: social sciences (Meekes et al., 2020) which includes economics (Dogru et al., 2019), and environmental sciences (Sinclair et al., 2019). ...
... them to travel [1,2], giving rise to a type of tourism that has been addressed in different ways, namely, as negative sightseeing [3], black spots tourism [4], thanatourism [5], tragic tourism [6], atrocity tourism [7,8], morbid tourism [9], and dark tourism [10]. The term dark tourism, the most profusely used by the scientific community and the general public [11], was first introduced by Foley and Lennon [10], who refer to these phenomena as embracing "the presentation and consumption (by visitors) of real and commodified death and disaster sites" and the "commodification of anxiety and doubt" [12]. According to Stone [13], dark tourism is "an old concept in a new world", and the novelty lies in the growing commodification of dark tourism sites; it "refers to visits, intentional or otherwise, to purposeful/non-purposeful sites which offer a presentation of death or suffering as the raison d'être" [13]. ...
... Research states that in dark tourism there exist a direct and indirect influence of emotional values [43]. These dark destinations are deeply rooted in destruction and are perceived as psychological healing that combats loss and tragedy [44]; [45]. The connect with destruction provides a metacognitive linkage between the living and the dead; which can create an ontological meaning of mortality [46]. ...
... The term 'city tourism' is intrinsically connected with the destination-an urban or metropolitan area featuring an advanced city infrastructure with public transport facilities, accommodation, restaurants, as well as cultural, sports, entertainment, commercial, municipal, and other facilities serving both tourists and residents [20,21]. City tourism has been on an upward trend in recent years and has become one of the most rapidly growing forms of tourism [22]. In many destinations, city tourism is one of the major determinants of economic success [22], laying foundations for social and economic development [23] by stimulating entrepreneurship [24] and the labour market [25], improving the life quality of residents [26,27], activating the local economy, and rejuvenating urban areas. ...
... As a new theoretical framework for tourism economics research, tourism scholars are increasingly interested in EEG. In recent decades, EEG has been widely applied to study the development of tourism areas [20][21][22], the governance of tourist destinations [17,23,24], and the path creation of tourism industry [25,26]. In particular, the concepts of path dependence and co-evolution have greatly contributed to the theorizing of tourism economics research [19]. ...
... Leisure-led regional development is not easily directed or planned. Fragmentation, a balance between development and protecting existing qualities, and crossovers between leisure and broader regional development entail a high degree of complexity and non-linear development (Meekes, Buda, & De Roo, 2017b). According to the concept of complexity, non-linear development represents the result of internal interactions between various parts in an open system, which respond to changes in the environment (Cilliers, 2005;O'Sullivan, 2004). ...
... examined, for example, how affective qualities shape the attractiveness of destinations (d 'Hauteserre, 2015) and how affect can be managed and mobilised to cultivate a particular tourist experience (Freidus & Caro, 2021). Affect has been highlighted as foundational to tourism where the quest for sensory and emotional experiences is central (Buda, 2015;Tucker & Shelton, 2018). Yet, apart from Hall (2018) research on mountaineering, attention to affective politics in adventure tourism is lacking. ...
... Under the umbrella of heritage tsunami and dark tourism, post-natural disaster tourism has recently become a tourism attraction (Buda, 2016). The tsunami museum is one of the tourism attractions built upon the natural disaster of the tsunami hitting countries such as Japan, Hawaii, Sri Lanka, and Indonesia. ...
... With the exception of Chinese day trippers crossing into the DPRK via land for mostly business purposes (Buda & Shim, 2015a, 2015bReilly, 2014aReilly, , 2014b, most travelers from the west, as well as non-Chinese Asians, fly into the capital, Pyongyang. A few licensed and specialized tour operators assist and guide tourists within an itinerary that is narrowly defined, officially approved, and under strict surveillance, usually lasting for approximately a week (Buda & Shim, 2015a;Connell, 2017). ...
... As death is an integral part of life, it is, of course, also a part of the tourism experience. The connection between tourism and death appears in various ways: dark tourism (Buda, 2015;Craig Wight, 2020;Stone and Sharpley, 2008) and death/suicide tourism (euthanasia) (Gauthier et al., 2015;Huxtable, 2009;Shondell Miller and Gonzalez, 2013;Wen et al., 2019). In contemporary societies, there is a paradoxical situation where death is removed from daily life and made a taboo on the one hand, and it is possible to face death while having fun or on vacation on the other hand (Pratt et al., 2019). ...