Donna E. Young's research while affiliated with Albany Law School of Union University and other places

Publications (8)

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Full-text available
African Americans and other people of color seek redress for their racial injuries. However, if we are living in a post-racial society, one that is blind to race, then widespread redress makes no sense since widespread discrimination allegedly is a thing of the past. Therefore, it is worth asking, “if racial justice is about remembering racial inju...
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In Uganda a complex system linking property rights, domestic violence, and subordinating traditions leads to women's disproportionate vulnerability to HIV/AIDS infection. In order to dismantle this system we must recognize the gendered pattern of HIV/AIDS transmission and acknowledge that vulnerability to HIV/AIDS is the result of a patriarchal sys...
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United States jurisprudence on racial subordination and inequality has been studied by lawmakers around the globe. This is not surprising given the historical impact that race has had on U.S. constitutionalism. Yet, some of the most successful anti-discrimination principles found in constitutional models outside the United States owe their effectiv...
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Critical Race Theory: A Comparative Approach - Volume 91 - Donna E. Young
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Racial Releases contributes to a lively and increasingly heated debate about the appropriate role of law in regulating the workplace. Since the end of the nineteenth century, the employment at-will doctrine has been the foundation for legal regulation of the employment relationship. According to the doctrine, so long as employer and employee have e...
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In this article Young examines the legal regulation of labor mobility, particularly the mobility of women workers from developing countries to Canada and the United States. Of particular importance is the employment relationship between domestic/home workers and their employers. In the era of globalization, domestic, regional and international laws...
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In this article, Professor Young examines the effects of diversity discourse on the teaching experience of women of color law professors. She argues that some of the most common arguments in favor of faculty diversity (that increasing faculty diversity provides positive role models, increases sensitivity to racial bias, provides resources for major...
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This article is an introduction to an Albany Law Review Symposium. International human rights standards are often circumvented with the claim that domestic laws reflect cultural practices, and that to the extent that international norms conflict with cultural practice, they are to be given little or no weight in regulating domestic matters. This ar...

Citations

... We do not readily see that lack of access to health care may be considered a hate-crime; we do not see that voter identification acts may be considered hate-crimes; we do not see the existence of food deserts in the 'inner city' as hate-crimes; we do not see the structural inequalities of the tax code as hate-crimes; we do not see the disproportionate impact of the housing crisis on African Americans as hatecrimes; we do not see the continued racial gaps among wages and unemployment levels as hate-crimes; we do not see the gaps among educational opportunities and achievement as hate-crimes (cf. Blee, 2005;Brescia, 2009;MacDorman & Mathews, 2008;Warde, 2012;young, 2012). Neither do we see that the allowance of these unequal and asymmetric conditions to continue constitutes a hate-crime. ...
... arts (J. Young, 1984), they bare additional burdens as a result of their ethnicity (Aguirre, 2000). In short, the barriers faced by minority women faculty members in academia hinder their advancement to a greater degree than similar obstacles facing White women faculty members (Dejoie, 1977;Elmore & Blackburn, 1983;Grillo, 1997;Menges & Exum, 1983;D. Young, 1996). ...